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Arts Funding

NEWS
May 10, 2004
Bravo for the volunteers who kept the doors open last week at the cash-strapped African American Museum in Philadelphia. City officials deserve credit, too, for coming forward quickly with a proposal to accelerate a city subsidy of $135,000 to the museum. Both city and civic leaders understand that the museum at Seventh and Arch Streets is an important draw for the city's burgeoning visitor industry - with African Americans comprising fully one-third of the city's tourists.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey State Museum and other arts groups will need more support from private corporations if they are to survive this year's deep cuts in arts funding, Gov. Florio told a group of corporate leaders yesterday. The governor, who visited the museum to address its new Corporate Friends group, said it will be at least a year before the state will be in the financial position to revive the museum's acquisition fund, which is being cut from $700,000 to nothing.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | BY MICHAEL MACFEAT
ALTHOUGH IT is great to see the Daily News endorse the work of a living Philadelphia artist, the photographer Zoe Strauss, the most interesting part of this article is that the Daily News shares the concerns regarding the Mural Arts Program put forth a decade ago by the Heretical Society, which was an independent artists' organization that provided a critique of the culture industry in Philadelphia, and which disbanded in 2001. The final statement of the Daily News editorial is very similar to the last line of the Heretical Society tract, the essay "No More Ugly Murals.
NEWS
April 23, 2004
Not all the documents on Mayor Street's reasonable plan to consolidate city recreation facilities have been hastily assembled and partially handwritten. Only the documents, it seems, that administration officials presented to a skeptical City Council this week. That's unfortunate and unacceptable. Recreation Commissioner Victor N. Richard 3d came ill-prepared Tuesday to outline the plans to close some playgrounds, pools and recreation centers, while enhancing others. It should not have come as a surprise that Council President Anna C. Verna would demand the latest list of facilities targeted for sale, lease or closure.
NEWS
May 4, 2004
MAYBE IF Dick Cheney, Karen Hughes and other John Kerry critics had gone to Vietnam, they would have earned the right to question his post-war actions. But since Cheney and others did what they could to avoid Vietnam, they can't understand the hell that Vietnam vets went through. It's easy for people like the president, vice president and Paul Wolfowitz to take pro-war postures given that they don't know what happens in war. To think that for eight years the Republicans bashed Bill Clinton for avoiding service in Vietnam.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By JOHN W. COOPER
The controversy over National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) funding for Andres Serrano's crucifix submerged in urine and Robert Mapplethorpe's photographs of naked children and sodomizing men raises three fascinating questions. First, what are the limits of artistic expression under the constitutional protection of free speech? Second, is there a category of "art" that a free people may tolerate but should not be compelled to subsidize with tax dollars? Third, to what extent should the government be involved at all in subsidizing the arts?
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in five years, Congress has voted to increase the annual budget of the long-beleaguered National Endowment for the Arts. The funding, which tacked $7 million onto the NEA budget, bringing it to $105 million, was contained within the mammoth Interior Department appropriations bill passed on Thursday. The bill now goes to President Clinton, who is expected to sign it. "This is a tremendous victory," said Bill Ivey, chairman of the endowment. "It is the culmination of a decade-long fight.
NEWS
May 8, 2004 | By Michael Currie Schaffer and Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In a light rain, about 200 people rallied in LOVE Park during yesterday's afternoon rush hour to protest the city's $4 million in cuts to funding for arts and cultural programs. The Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance organized the Rally for the Arts to protest proposed cuts for the fiscal year that begins July 1. Rebecca Lang Staffieri, a spokeswoman for the group, said the marchers in what is formally known as John F. Kennedy Plaza wanted to call attention to the cuts "so the mayor and the Council can see that arts and culture are a good thing for the city's promotional efforts.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Officials of arts organizations here reacted with great relief yesterday when they heard that the University of Pennsylvania's Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) would not be subject to a threatened five-year ban on federal aid, as a result of a compromise on arts funding reached by a joint Congressional committee. Penn president Sheldon Hackney released a statement saying he was gratified that Congress had dropped "the blacklist" effort against the gallery that was "punitive and inhibited free expression.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
Imagine the buzz at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts when The Lion King arrives: hundreds of pint-size theater-goers thronging the grand lobby under the Kimmel's vault. Now picture the lobby empty and silent - no crowds straining at the now-tattered and dusty velvet ropes, no one eagerly queuing up at the hall's long-shuttered snack bars. Unthinkable? Of course. The Kimmel is just three years old, and it's a gem among Philadelphia's cultural riches. Those attractions include top-flight museums, historic sites and other visitor destinations.
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