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Arts Funding

NEWS
May 4, 2004
MAYBE IF Dick Cheney, Karen Hughes and other John Kerry critics had gone to Vietnam, they would have earned the right to question his post-war actions. But since Cheney and others did what they could to avoid Vietnam, they can't understand the hell that Vietnam vets went through. It's easy for people like the president, vice president and Paul Wolfowitz to take pro-war postures given that they don't know what happens in war. To think that for eight years the Republicans bashed Bill Clinton for avoiding service in Vietnam.
NEWS
April 23, 2004
Not all the documents on Mayor Street's reasonable plan to consolidate city recreation facilities have been hastily assembled and partially handwritten. Only the documents, it seems, that administration officials presented to a skeptical City Council this week. That's unfortunate and unacceptable. Recreation Commissioner Victor N. Richard 3d came ill-prepared Tuesday to outline the plans to close some playgrounds, pools and recreation centers, while enhancing others. It should not have come as a surprise that Council President Anna C. Verna would demand the latest list of facilities targeted for sale, lease or closure.
NEWS
April 8, 2004
Cutting arts funding is a quality-of-life issue The Inquirer editorial urging reconsideration of the proposed cuts to Philadelphia's cultural and arts organizations made a powerful argument based on the premise that the health and strength of these organizations is directly related to the city's economy ("Pay it forward," April 3). While this investment in the city's attractions that bring in major dollars to our economy ought to be sufficiently persuasive, there are two other arguments we should think about.
NEWS
April 3, 2004
Isn't it great news that Philly Phlash tour buses will roll in May, once again linking Philadelphia's cultural and historic attractions from Penn's Landing to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway? There's just one little problem: When the Phlash stops at some cultural sites, tourists may need to jump out and check whether the lights are still on. Curtailed hours at key museums - notably, the Museum of Art - are just some of the dangers posed by proposed budget cutbacks from the Street administration.
NEWS
March 19, 2004 | By Marcia Gelbart and Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
From consolidating trash-collection hours to cutting rec centers and pools to axing all city funding for the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Mayor Street nipped and tucked his way through $227 million worth of spending cuts to present a balanced $3.4 billion budget to City Council yesterday. In delivering his budget address, the mayor appealed to his political adversaries to "listen and compromise" with him in making tough trade-offs on a budget that is about 20 percent larger than the one he delivered during his first days as mayor in 2000.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The original picture was dark and foreboding, with all state funding for arts, culture and history wiped out to help control a cavernous budget gap. Now the image is hazy, with Gov. McGreevey's administration backtracking by pledging to try to restore at least half of $18 million in arts grants that had been cut and to help find other sources of money. "There's a commitment that we'll find the money," said Eric Shuffler, counselor to the governor. "We want to do what we can to keep them going.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The original picture was dark and foreboding, with all state funding for arts, culture and history wiped out to help control a cavernous budget gap. Now the image is hazy, with Gov. McGreevey's administration backtracking by pledging to try to restore at least half of the $18 million in arts grants that had been cut and to help find other sources of money. "There's a commitment that we'll find the money," said Eric Shuffler, counselor to the governor. "We want to do what we can to keep them going.
NEWS
February 19, 2003 | By Mark Howat
When Franklin Roosevelt said, "Every time an artist dies, part of the vision of mankind passes with him," he could never have imagined what is happening to artists in New Jersey. With all state funding of the arts to be cut off under Gov. McGreevey's Scrooge Budget, the arts - if not the artists - are about to wither and perish in a state where they have always flourished. Here's what is happening at Surflight Theatre, Long Beach Island's showplace for performing arts. For the last three years, Surflight has received an annual $30,000 grant from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts and a $50,000 grant from the state itself.
NEWS
February 6, 2003 | By Troy Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Countering the governor's proposal to remove all state funding for the arts, a coalition of groups is asking New Jersey to combine tourism, arts and history under a single agency and create a permanent tax to fund them. The "tourism tax" would add to the 6 percent sales tax a 3 percent levy on hotel and motel rooms and a 2 percent levy on restaurant meals, entertainment and amusements. The groups expect the new tax would raise $250 million in the first year, of which $60 million would be returned to municipalities.
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