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FOOD
June 15, 1994 | By Johnny Lerro, FOR THE INQUIRER
We're heading into those salad days of summer, folks, and today I have an addition to the salad bowl that may not be too familiar to you. Next time you're in the mood for something a little different, try arugula. This nutty-flavored salad green is pronounced ah-ROO-guh-lah, a name that really rolls off the tongue. It has a zesty flavor, just like watercress and radishes. And because it's a member of the cruciferous family - you know, those cancer-fighting cabbages - it's loaded with Vitamins A and C, iron and calcium.
FOOD
September 13, 1987 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
"You mean you've got arugula! Well, let's go, what are we waiting for?" Eli exclaimed, weary after a seven-hour drive, but not weary enough to pass up an immediate trip to the garden for his favorite green. His passion puzzled me a bit because, although Eli King is fond of good food, he's hardly the sort of trend-conscious diner one thinks of when thinking of arugula, a salad ingredient as ubiquitous as radicchio and endive in more fashionable restaurants. So I asked, and it turned out he learned to like it from his mother, the painter Lois Dodd, who learned the joys of arugula when she was a poor student in Rome 30 years ago. "They sold it at the morning market," she explained, "in bunches with all sorts of other greens and herbs.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Yahoo headline today makes quite a claim: "How to Make the Perfect Steak Sandwich. " With mayo, arugula and cheddar? And open-faced? No, it's not from the Washington-addled brain of Sen. John Kerry, who once tried to order a cheesesteak hoagie with Swiss here in Philly. It's from a Left Coast gourmet place, with its own ideas. To be fair, the billing doesn't say "Philly cheesesteak," so nobody's arguing authenticity. Still, "perfect" invites comparisons.
FOOD
August 9, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
My father has never been much of a food guy. But when it came to melons, he was way ahead of the curve. Served a wedge of cantaloupe, he'd sprinkle it with salt and pepper. I've never seen anyone else do that, but the combination is terrific - a good melon is way too wonderful to be treated only as a sweet. There are plenty of traditional examples of this. The most obvious is melon and prosciutto, and a very good one it is: the satin saltiness of the ham playing against the buttery sweetness of the melon.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 1 cocktail 2 ounces vodka 3/4 ounces lemon juice 3/4 ounces simple syrup 6-7 leaves of arugula 1. Muddle arugula leaves, lemon juice, and simple syrup in small mixing tin. 2. Add vodka to mixing tin and shake ingredients with ice. 3. Double-strain mixture into cocktail glass full of ice. Garnish with arugula leaf. - From Mike DiTota
FOOD
September 8, 2011 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
A mixture of arugula, parsley, balsamic vinegar, garlic, and mustard keeps the trout fillets in this recipe moist and goes nicely with the barely roasted blueberries scattered on top.   Baked Trout With Arugula and Blueberries Makes 4 servings   4 large arugula leaves Leaves from 6 to 8 stems flat-leaf parsley 1 large clove garlic 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ...
FOOD
May 3, 1995 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
Springtime is greens time. Years ago, people looked forward to picking arugula, sorrel and dandelion in the wild, a sign that spring had truly arrived. These same greens, in cultivated form, are somewhat milder in flavor than they are in the wild. Vitamin-packed - though perishable - greens add zip to soups, salads and pasta. Arugula, sorrel and dandelion each have their own individual, unmistakable personality. Take advantage of this season and use spring greens to expand your cooking repertoire.
FOOD
June 19, 2008 | By Linda Gassenheimer, MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
Salmon steaks are thick and juicy and a nice alternative to salmon fillets. The lemon dill sauce takes only minutes to mix together. Gentle poaching is a fail-safe method of cooking salmon - the secret is to slightly undercook it. It will continue to cook in its own heat for a few minutes. Wild salmon is in season now. It's a wonderful treat. Buy extra and freeze it for when it is out of season. To test for doneness, insert a knife into the meat and pull the flesh away slightly. It should be opaque, not clear.
FOOD
July 5, 1989 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Food Writer
One of the drawbacks of cooking with the early microwave ovens was that foods were not attractively browned in the process. Today's cook has a battery of specially designed utensils to help with that step, but such devices tend to be relatively expensive. An alternative is to brown the foods in the conventional way, using a stovetop burner. The browned foods can then be finished with microwave speed. To illustrate, consider the following menu designed for cooks In a Hurry.
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NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anthony John DiMarco, 90, of Feasterville and Ocean City, N.J., a longtime builder of rowhouses in Philadelphia and South Jersey, died Tuesday, Oct. 7, of complications from dementia at SpringVillage at Floral Vale, Yardley. As a young man, Mr. DiMarco entered the building business with his brother, John, under the name DiMarco Construction. The two were known for putting up hundreds of townhouses and rowhouses, initially in Northeast Philadelphia. Later, they branched out and built more than 4,000 apartments in Philadelphia and South Jersey.
FOOD
April 18, 2013
Makes 1 cocktail 2 ounces vodka 3/4 ounces lemon juice 3/4 ounces simple syrup 6-7 leaves of arugula 1. Muddle arugula leaves, lemon juice, and simple syrup in small mixing tin. 2. Add vodka to mixing tin and shake ingredients with ice. 3. Double-strain mixture into cocktail glass full of ice. Garnish with arugula leaf. - From Mike DiTota
FOOD
August 9, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Los Angeles Times
My father has never been much of a food guy. But when it came to melons, he was way ahead of the curve. Served a wedge of cantaloupe, he'd sprinkle it with salt and pepper. I've never seen anyone else do that, but the combination is terrific - a good melon is way too wonderful to be treated only as a sweet. There are plenty of traditional examples of this. The most obvious is melon and prosciutto, and a very good one it is: the satin saltiness of the ham playing against the buttery sweetness of the melon.
FOOD
January 26, 2012 | By J.M. Hirsch, Associated Press
When you select the right ingredients, it doesn't take many of them to create a fantastic dinner. Nor much time. The trick is to pick ingredients with lots of flavor, then let them do the heavy lifting. This recipe for spicy sausage and arugula penne is a great example. I boil some pasta, then toss it with browned peppery sausage, deliciously bitter baby arugula, some savory sun-dried tomatoes, and grated Parmesan. The result is amazing.   Spicy Sausage and Arugula Penne Makes 6 servings 12 ounces penne pasta 1 pound spicy Italian sausage meat 1 large yellow onion, diced 1/2 cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, chopped 5-ounce package arugula 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese Salt and ground black pepper 1. Bring a large saucepan of salted water to a boil.
NEWS
October 21, 2011 | By Eva Monheim, Inquirer Columnist
  Pick apples and pears. If you don't grow your own, now's the perfect time to take the family to a local farm for harvesting. Jarring or freezing freshly made applesauce and making pear butter will be a memorable family activity. (To find a farm near you, go to http://www.pickyourown.org/ .) If you make pies, freeze them unbaked. When the holidays approach and time is short, your family and friends will appreciate a thoughtful homemade treat. Bring in tropical plants.
FOOD
September 8, 2011 | By Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
A mixture of arugula, parsley, balsamic vinegar, garlic, and mustard keeps the trout fillets in this recipe moist and goes nicely with the barely roasted blueberries scattered on top.   Baked Trout With Arugula and Blueberries Makes 4 servings   4 large arugula leaves Leaves from 6 to 8 stems flat-leaf parsley 1 large clove garlic 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ...
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Yahoo headline today makes quite a claim: "How to Make the Perfect Steak Sandwich. " With mayo, arugula and cheddar? And open-faced? No, it's not from the Washington-addled brain of Sen. John Kerry, who once tried to order a cheesesteak hoagie with Swiss here in Philly. It's from a Left Coast gourmet place, with its own ideas. To be fair, the billing doesn't say "Philly cheesesteak," so nobody's arguing authenticity. Still, "perfect" invites comparisons.
FOOD
July 22, 2010 | By Joan Obra, McClatchy Newspapers
For a peppery bite in your food, it's time to turn to arugula. This leafy green takes on a more spicy character in the summer heat. And arugula's firm leaves make it suitable for dishes ranging from salads to stir-fries. Here's a quick guide to buying, storing and eating it: When shopping for arugula, look for firm, crisp leaves. "When you take a leaf and bend it, it will crack," says farmer Lou Pasquale of Il Giardino Organico of Fresno, Calif. When Pasquale is harvesting arugula for farmers markets, he also looks for a deep green color and a nice scent.
NEWS
December 11, 2009 | By Astrid Scholz, Ulf Sonesson, and Peter Tyedmers
Go local. Eat organic. Buy fresh. Those food mantras continue to make waves among environmentally conscious consumers. But if the motivation is to truly make our diets more Earth-friendly, then perhaps we need a new mantra: Buy frozen. Several years ago, the three of us - two ecological economists and one food system researcher - teamed up in an effort to understand how to develop sustainable systems to feed a planet of nine billion by 2050. As the focus of our study, we chose salmon, an important source of protein around the world and a food that is available nearly anywhere at any time, regardless of season or local supply.
NEWS
December 2, 2008 | By Simon Maloy
A friend from Ohio once told me that if I ever heard the question "You think you're better than me?" in a Youngstown bar, I should duck and cover. A fight likely would ensue. By promoting the idea that average Americans would reject the idea of an "elitist" such as Barack Obama as their president, conservatives and the media predicted a sort of collective national shout of "You think you're better than me?" Of course, that did not happen. Obama was elected despite his purported elitism, and exit polls showed that 57 percent of voters said yes when asked, "Is Obama in touch with people like you?"
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