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BUSINESS
May 17, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia will be the US Airways hub for nonstop flights to Asia if the airline launches service to China, Japan or Turkey, airline officials said. Currently, the only nonstop flight to Asia from Philadelphia International Airport is a US Airways flight to Tel Aviv, Israel. Philadelphia is the largest metro area in the country without nonstop service to other cities in Asia. Service to Beijing, Istanbul or Narita, Japan, will await the delivery of new long-distance planes in the next several years and would also depend on fuel costs and government approvals, officials said.
NEWS
December 28, 2004
IN OUR world, hyperbole reigns supreme. Traffic jams become "nightmares. " The words "amazing" and "incredible" jump from our lips to describe routine athletic feats. But a true calamity, like the tsunamis that killed at least 22,000, sobers us. Our minor travails become trivial; our desire to pump up less significant events with concocted drama and heightened bluster fall pitifully short. At Philadelphia International Airport over the holidays, thousands of passengers were angry when bad weather and apparent union action forced flights to be canceled and baggage to go awry.
NEWS
January 15, 1994 | By GEORGE F. WILL
In the mystery novel Trent's Last Case, there is a scene in Simpson's restaurant in London, where Trent asks his companion to speak softly when ordering a glass of milk in that posh place because the head waiter has a weak heart. Let us hope that Americans with hearts as weak as that head waiter's did not notice their government's behavior last week. The Clinton administration faced a crucial decision concerning a Communist regime in Asia: What to do about North Korea making a mockery of treaty obligations, en route to becoming a nuclear power?
BUSINESS
September 8, 1991 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kampung Baharu is a short drive from the city's tallest office tower, past the Moorish-style cupolas of the old British secretariat to a corner on Raja Abdullah Street, marked by billboards for Marlboro cigarettes and Kellogg's cereal. Kampung means village in Malay, and Kampung Baharu remains exactly that, a village of crowing roosters and clotheslines and wood-framed houses on stilts smack in the middle of Kuala Lumpur's headlong charge into Southeast Asian affluence. Mohamad Zulhai Mi, 38, grew up in Kampung Baharu and takes what seems to be a typically Malaysian view of government plans to develop the area.
NEWS
March 24, 1997 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
By the light of a half moon, they dipped their net into Little Sheep's Head Creek and let the windy, cold night envelop them in a waiting game. In precisely one hour, the net is hoisted out of the inky inlet and over the railing of the wooden bridge and checked for baby eels. The success of the catch is not measured by its size, but by the simple fact that a collection is made every week. That is because it could be decades before information gathered since 1989 from the salt marsh creeks around the Rutgers University Marine Field Station tells researchers whether a flourishing market for baby eels in Asia has affected the fragile marine ecosystem of the Jersey Shore.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | By JONATHAN POWER
The thought is slowly beginning to sink into the West's subconscious mind - children born in the Western world today will not so much be competing with each other, but with the fast-growing economic powerhouses of Asia and Latin America. Yet the picture for most Westerners still looks like a murky double- exposure, blurred with our old traditional images of overworked peasants, rib cages prominent, parched fields and hyper-ventilating shanty towns, almost breathless for lack of space and opportunity, its overcrowded children riddled with sewer-borne disease.
SPORTS
March 30, 1998 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Chris Kilbourn-Peterson really wants to watch tonight's Utah-Kentucky NCAA championship game. But the former Marple Newtown and current Princeton University basketball player has another pressing matter that may keep him away from a television set. "I'm in a design class," Kilbourn-Peterson said. "I'm building an engine. " Kilbourn-Peterson is building a life, of which basketball is a large part. But it certainly isn't the only part, which is what led the 6-foot-7 junior center to miss Princeton's two NCAA tournament games earlier this month.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Janice Vasta became a believer in 1953, when she said "I do" to a guy named Tony. Three years earlier, at the age of 18, a psychic had told her that she would marry a Tony and that she would have two sons - a strange prediction considering the fact that the only Tony she knew at the time, and the one she ended up marrying, she didn't particularly like. The two sons came later. In the 40 years since her mind was first read by a psychic, Vasta has become a mind reader's version of a paperback novel.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
Stocks fell along a broad front, led by technology and banking shares, as Asia's economic crisis continued to endanger profits at U.S. multinational corporations.
BUSINESS
June 19, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer
The Dow average took a breather yesterday after Monday's tumble and Wednesday's rebound. Broader indexes also posted small losses despite a strong day in Asia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, Classical Music Critic
When the Chinese economy took a southward turn at the start of 2016, Philadelphia Orchestra watchers had to pause. The orchestra has invested heavily in relationships throughout China in recent years - were these ties now in jeopardy? Any hand-wringing seems to have evolved into a why-worry shrug as the orchestra embarks on its 2016 Tour of Asia. It starts with a pair of Hong Kong concerts May 19 and 20 that will be broadcast live by WRTI-FM - the first visits there since 2005 - followed by dates in Macau, Shanghai, Beijing, and then Japan.
TRAVEL
February 28, 2016
Answer: Asia. With about 17 million square miles, it easily outranks Africa, which is about 11.7 million square miles.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Tom Vilsack
Picture this: nearly 500 million people - more than four times the number of people who watched the Super Bowl last year. That's the equivalent of every man, woman, and child living in the 11 other countries that make up the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), and they're all hungry for the American brand of agriculture. These half-billion potential shoppers can't get enough of what American agriculture is dishing up, and their needs aren't currently being met. The Obama administration's team of negotiators has taken America's farmers one step closer to fully tapping into that market with the finalization of the TPP agreement.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia has long wanted a direct flight to the Asia Pacific region. A survey of business travelers here in 2012 found the top desired international business destinations were Tokyo, Shanghai, Beijing and Mumbai, India. Philadelphia already has a lot of international service to Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. But attracting a nonstop flight to China, Japan, Hong Kong, or Korea has proven difficult. "We are the largest metropolitan area in the United States without direct nonstop service tothe Asia Pacific," Philadelphia International Airport CEO Mark Gale saidin a recent interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2014 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Those eager for the sights, sounds, smells, and tastes of Southeast Asia or Africa need only visit Penn's Landing this weekend to find satisfaction. Two popular ethnic festivals are returning to the Delaware River waterfront, promising fun without flight delays or foreign currency exchanges. On Saturday, the fourth annual Southeast Asian Dragon Boat Festival will put a focus on Penn's Landing Marina, near the popular pop-up Spruce Street Harbor Park. Besides races in the vessels that give the event its name, visitors can enjoy dance performances traditional and modern at the Great Plaza stage.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2013 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
When Martin Rawls-Meehan started making adjustable beds in 2004, it was a foregone conclusion that key parts would be made overseas. It was cheaper to manufacture in Taiwan than in the United States, and from Taiwan it was easier to ship to customers in Asia. But this year, Rawls-Meehan's company, Reverie, began making some beds in their entirety at a factory in New York. "Shipping costs are tremendous," he said, soaring between 50 percent and 60 percent since the company was founded.
NEWS
January 1, 2013 | By Sylvia Hui and Rod Mcguirk, Associated Press
LONDON - Lavish fireworks displays ushered in 2013 across the Asia-Pacific region on Tuesday, and Europe was holding scaled-back festivities and street parties in the hope of beginning a year that will be kinder to its battered economies. Asian cities kicked off New Year's celebrations in style and an atmosphere of renewed optimism. Huge fireworks lit up skylines in Sydney, Hong Kong, and Shanghai, and the once-isolated country of Myanmar joined the countdown party for the first time in decades.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
HARRISBURG - Three state police lieutenants - including the former head of the elite detail that guards the Pennsylvania governor - were investigated by the FBI and the state police for their involvement with prostitutes during successive personal vacations to Southeast Asia. Records in a case pending in federal court in Pennsylvania say the lieutenants all admitted hiring the prostitutes on trips between 2002 and 2008. An Associated Press review of the internal state police records shows the supervisors evaded significant punishment, and a Right-to-Know Law request found no evidence they were discharged or demoted, the state police said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 24, 2012 | By Mark Scolforo, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - Three state police lieutenants - including the former head of the elite detail that guards the governor - were investigated by the FBI and the state police for their alleged involvement with prostitutes during successive personal vacations to Southeast Asia. Records in a case pending in federal court in Pennsylvania say the lieutenants all admitted hiring the prostitutes on trips between 2002 and 2008. An Associated Press review of the internal state police records shows the supervisors evaded significant punishment, and a Right-to-Know Law request found no evidence they were discharged or demoted, the state police said Wednesday.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Reem Khalifa, Associated Press
MANAMA, Bahrain - American envoys challenged assertions Saturday that Washington seeks to diminish its role in Middle East affairs, insisting that U.S. political ties and energy needs bind the country closely to a region full of "threat and promise. " The defensive tone by U.S. officials, in response to questions raised at an international security summit in Bahrain, reflects growing speculation about a possible U.S. policy realignment toward Asia at the expense of Mideast initiatives.
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