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Asian Women

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NEWS
April 23, 1987 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
When South Asian women get in trouble, Anu Rao usually gets a call. When the women show up at the city's domestic-violence programs, Rao is asked to intervene. And when they need city support services, Rao ends up helping. "I get calls from therapists all over the city," she said. Rao, who works at the University of Pennsylvania, never gets paid for those services, which range from translator to therapist. What she does get paid to do, she said, often must be juggled around domestic crises in the area's South Asian community, made up primarily of Indians and Pakistanis.
NEWS
September 26, 2005 | By Sunny Hu INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health providers hoping to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer among Asian women are contending with a foe as tenacious as the disease: tradition. National Cancer Institute statistics show that the cancer is five times more common among Vietnamese women than white women because many are reluctant to get tested for this highly preventable disease. Surveys show Asian women have lower cancer screening rates, and a significant number of Korean Americans have never heard of the Pap test - which has decreased cervical cancer deaths by 75 percent in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1994 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's so much going on in Bhaji on the Beach, a cross-generational, cross-cultural comedy from director Gurinder Chadha, that it's a wonder the thing doesn't fold in on itself. The story of a group of Asian women from the British Midlands who take a day-trip to the working-class resort of Blackpool, this mostly upbeat movie grapples with issues of racism, sexism, consumerism and community identity crises - as reflected by its busload of characters' personal dilemmas. There's Hashida, a brainy pre-med student who's carrying on a secret affair with an African British man - and now finds herself pregnant and afraid to tell her Punjabi parents.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Asian and African American women are less likely to be successful with in vitro fertilization than white or Hispanic women, new research shows. The reasons for the disparity are not clear, but the effect of race was as significant as aging on fertility, according to two studies presented yesterday at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine convention in Philadelphia. In other words, a 35-year-old Asian or black woman had the same chance of delivering an IVF baby as a 40-year-old white or Hispanic woman - about 20 percent.
LIVING
April 5, 1999 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At age 16, Mun Pil-gi was kidnapped from her village home in Korea and sent to Manchuria to sexually service Japanese troops. For a short while, a Japanese military doctor kept her from the soldiers. But she soon took her place among the other captives - in a cubicle where, each day, she endured dozens of officially sanctioned rapes. By the time World War II brought liberation, she was physically and emotionally debilitated. "I couldn't have babies," she told an interviewer, "because the Japanese ruined my body.
NEWS
November 26, 1991 | By Raoul V. Mowatt, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Reilly was trying to keep things peaceful the day he was murdered, according to testimony in Municipal Court yesterday. In the early morning hours of Aug. 3, his friends approached a group of 10 Asians in the McCreesh playground in Southwest Philadelphia and started to threaten them, a statement read in court indicated. He wanted his friends to stop. When they didn't, one of the Asians returned with knives and meat cleavers. What happened next is unclear, but three things are certain.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Cambodian woman stood in the dark, outside the locked metal doors of the women's shelter, cradling her sleeping baby and holding the hand of her 7- year-old son. She was 24 and alone. After years of abuse at the hands of her husband, she sneaked out of her home without so much as pausing to pack a bag of clothes for her family. Once inside the shelter, a counselor for Women Against Abuse told the woman she could return to her apartment with police to gather her belongings, but she refused.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Asian population in Philadelphia tends to be sicker than the city average and less likely to have a regular source of medical care, Dr. Walter Tsou, the city's health commissioner, told a community gathering in Chinatown last night. Tsou told the meeting of about 100 people at Chinese Christian Church on North 10th Street that while they represent only 5 percent of the city's population, Asians account for 23 percent of the 169 tuberculosis cases in the city last year and 24 percent of the hepatitis B cases.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Mixed marriages, once rare in the United States, are surging, largely because of the numbers of Asians and Hispanics marrying outside their racial and ethnic groups. Nearly 34 years after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the last state laws prohibiting mixed-race marriages, such unions now total about 1.5 million - a tenfold increase over 1960. Adding Hispanics who marry outside their ethnic group brings the total of mixed marriages to three million, based on an analysis of recent census survey data.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Thousands of young Filipino women have come to the United States as "mail order brides" in recent years. Dozens of private agencies exist solely to put American men in touch with Asian women . . . and vice versa. Betty Disto was surely among the most unlucky of mail-order brides. She had corresponded with Gary Heidnick for two years before coming here from the Philippines in 1985 to marry him. Within months, she fled, accusing him of cruelty. And he, of course, has now been arrested for the murder and torture of others.
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NEWS
September 7, 2012
DEAR Mr. President: I'm not sure you'll get this. Rahm Emmanuel told us on Tuesday that you had quite a collection of mail from other Americans and that you made him read and digest the letters because they spoke of values you "fought for every day. " So, while I know you're busy just now, I'm writing on the off chance you've got a few free moments. Given the number of people who've fronted for you at the convention, I'm hoping you've had time to put up your feet. Speaking of those people, they were an interesting bunch.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
A new study indicates that the prevalence of abortion among poor women has increased dramatically. That's disturbing information for people on both sides of the abortion debate who agree that the procedure should be less common. An estimated one out of three American women has had an abortion by age 45. And between 2000 and 2008, there was a nearly 60 percent increase in the proportion of poor women among that group, according to the study, by the Guttmacher Institute. The study, released Tuesday, said the proportion of poor women obtaining abortions increased from 27 percent to 42 percent in those eight years.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
A new study indicates that the prevalence of abortion among poor women has increased dramatically. That's disturbing information for people on both sides of the abortion debate who agree that the procedure should be less common. An estimated one out of three American women has had an abortion by age 45. And between 2000 and 2008, there was a nearly 60 percent increase in the proportion of poor women among that group, according to the study, by the Guttmacher Institute. The study, released Tuesday, said the proportion of poor women obtaining abortions increased from 27 percent to 42 percent in those eight years.
NEWS
December 12, 2008 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People lead tough lives in hard-time Philadelphia. But the toughest life to lead in this area is that of an African American or Latina woman. And there's very little indication that will change any time soon. That's the bad news from a report being released today by Women's Way, a nationally respected philanthropic and advocacy group in Center City. The report shows women's economic standing to be stagnant, given a continuing gender wage gap and the unending ravages of poverty in the five-county area.
NEWS
September 26, 2005 | By Sunny Hu INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Health providers hoping to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer among Asian women are contending with a foe as tenacious as the disease: tradition. National Cancer Institute statistics show that the cancer is five times more common among Vietnamese women than white women because many are reluctant to get tested for this highly preventable disease. Surveys show Asian women have lower cancer screening rates, and a significant number of Korean Americans have never heard of the Pap test - which has decreased cervical cancer deaths by 75 percent in recent years.
NEWS
October 19, 2004 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Asian and African American women are less likely to be successful with in vitro fertilization than white or Hispanic women, new research shows. The reasons for the disparity are not clear, but the effect of race was as significant as aging on fertility, according to two studies presented yesterday at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine convention in Philadelphia. In other words, a 35-year-old Asian or black woman had the same chance of delivering an IVF baby as a 40-year-old white or Hispanic woman - about 20 percent.
NEWS
July 22, 2002
IAGREE WITH OpEd columnist Michelle Malkin. Airport security is a joke - just as it always has been. If we want to really secure the airlines against terrorism, we're going to have to hire an army of legitimate, highly-trained anti-terror agents for every single airport in the country. To attract quality people, we're going to have to pay competitive salaries and give government benefits to every one of them. It's going to cost a fortune. I disagree with Michelle, though, that Asian women are not good candidates for profiling.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Michelle Myers and Catzie Vilayphonh are provocative and proud of it. Imagine us Asian women as imagined in the imagination of men from mainstream crackerville to ghettoland hip hop. Lotus Blossom demure, our perceived sexual modesty heightens curiosity and you know curiosity killed the kitty cat, cat . . . Raw and profane on stage as the spoken-word duo Yellow Rage, the two Philadelphians are attacking the pop-culture image...
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | By Frederick Cusick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Asian population in Philadelphia tends to be sicker than the city average and less likely to have a regular source of medical care, Dr. Walter Tsou, the city's health commissioner, told a community gathering in Chinatown last night. Tsou told the meeting of about 100 people at Chinese Christian Church on North 10th Street that while they represent only 5 percent of the city's population, Asians account for 23 percent of the 169 tuberculosis cases in the city last year and 24 percent of the hepatitis B cases.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | By Tony Pugh INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Mixed marriages, once rare in the United States, are surging, largely because of the numbers of Asians and Hispanics marrying outside their racial and ethnic groups. Nearly 34 years after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the last state laws prohibiting mixed-race marriages, such unions now total about 1.5 million - a tenfold increase over 1960. Adding Hispanics who marry outside their ethnic group brings the total of mixed marriages to three million, based on an analysis of recent census survey data.
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