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Asparagus

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FOOD
March 30, 1988 | By LUCY BARAJIKIAN, Los Angeles Daily News
They are the two botanical wonders of springtime: the delectable pine-cone- shaped artichoke and the sleek, elegant asparagus. They're regal, exotic and tempting, and viewed by many - and rightly so - as the aristocrats of the vegetable kingdom. It only heightens the wonder to know that, botanically speaking, the artichoke is a member of the thistle family. The asparagus is a member of the lily family. This includes not only onions, garlic and leeks, but tulips and hyacinths as well.
FOOD
April 25, 1993 | By Betty Rosbottom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Asparagus and red potatoes are particularly complementary salad partners. In this composition the asparagus is peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces and then blanched quickly. The potatoes, left unpeeled, are boiled and cut into wedges. The vegetables are then coated with a warm mustard dressing (a simple concoction of balsamic vinegar, Dijon mustard and olive oil) and served on a bed of alternating Boston lettuce and radicchio leaves. A generous sprinkling of fresh herbs adds both flavor and color to the dish.
FOOD
May 20, 1987 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Asparagus asks to be sauced. Its slender spears appear embarrassingly naked without a cloak of hollandaise or a vinaigrette dressing. Its flavor seems too overt before a buffer of beurre blanc or a touch of citrus tempers it. Whether pencil-thin or tree-trunk thick, asparagus is never finished until it is finished with a sauce, even if the sauce is something as simple as a smear of butter. Fortunately, many sauces that complement asparagus are as quick and simple to prepare as the vegetable itself.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Out in the country, the banter of buyers bidding for asparagus at the Swedesboro Auction usually heralds the approach of the hot hazy days of summer. But as the auction's 50th season opened yesterday, summer seemed to have beaten the farmers to market. And that meant trouble. While the temperature increased in recent days, so did the asparagus harvest, said John Lee Womack, manager of the Swedesboro Auction. Area growers lugged 355 crates crammed with the succulent spears to market yesterday - more than five times the amount sold on opening day last year.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Christopher Hand, Special to The Inquirer
At 6:15 a.m. on a damp, foggy Thursday, a truck loaded with a dozen migrant farm workers leaves a labor camp at Conte Farms in Tabernacle en route to an asparagus field several miles away. With top-40 music pounding from the radio, the truck stops beside an irrigation ditch and parks; workers, their asparagus cutters and wooden baskets in hand, disperse. Each concentrates on one row of the field, where succulent green spears rise seven inches from sandy soil in neat rows. "Too many flowers on this one," said Charles Cosme, 22, a native of Ciarles, Puerto Rico, as he stabbed a forked, stainless steel cutter into the soil two inches below a spear.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
This classic pairing of asparagus and poached egg is such a lovely weeknight dinner, especially as a herald to spring. It's not something I would make on a weeknight for the kids, I will confess, too challenging to poach all those eggs. But it is perfect supper for one or two. Though it is a few steps, the results are well worth the effort. This recipe, from Jane Hornby's newest offering, Fresh & Easy: What to Cook & How to Cook It, adds a sauce of balsamic vinegar and butter to the asparagus, for a spot-on finishing touch.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
For the pickled mushrooms: 2 quart containers of honshimeji mushrooms; a mix of brown and white is preferred 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 head of garlic, top trimmed 3 branches thyme 1 tablespoon coriander, crushed 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 quart mushroom or vegetable stock (store-bought stock is fine) 1/4 cup sherry vinegar For the onion puree: 2 large onions, peeled, diced fine 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup milk To finish: 1 bunch pencil asparagus, cut into one-inch pieces 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons shallots, chopped 2 tablespoons chopped tarragon or chives 1. Quickly blanch the mushrooms in boiling, salted water for a minute.
FOOD
May 30, 2013
This is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from May 28, 2013: Craig LaBan: It's been a good week for me, as you can see from this Crumb Tracker Quiz. Name the place I ate these dishes: (1) chu toro nigiri with tofu, ginger and chive; (2) crispy haloumi with poached figs; (3) lamb burger and fries with curry ketchup. I've got asparagus on the brain because we popped by amazing Terhune Orchards while in Princeton last weekend and found a "pick your own asparagus patch.
FOOD
May 12, 1993 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Forget the date, the equinox, temperatures - spring is finally here. Need proof? "We picked the first rhubarb today and it looks really good this year," David Hodge said with evident pleasure last week. That first crisp, crimson rhubarb - and the snappy green stems of asparagus that were ready for harvesting just a few days later - marked the true start of spring for farms such as the Hodges' family-run Highland Orchards in West Chester. Yes, we can have asparagus (imported)
FOOD
May 26, 2005 | By Annette Gooch FOR THE INQUIRER
By the stalk or the bundle, fresh domestic asparagus is too good to pass up when it's in season, generally from March through early June, depending on the weather and location. There's no better time to eat your fill of tender, succulent spears than when the domestic harvest is in. In peak season, when the supply is good and prices are low, treat yourself to a pound or two of plump, tender young spears surrounded by classic accompaniments: lemon wedges, butter, Hollandaise, vinaigrette, salt, and freshly ground pepper.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 9, 2016
Makes 6 to 8 servings as a side salad 2 to 3 large fennel bulbs (about 1 pound) 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, plus more to taste 11/4 pound asparagus 1/4 cup chopped fennel fronds 1/4 cup dill weed, pulled off the stems 1/3 cup (11/2 ounce) lightly toasted pine nuts 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1/2 tablespoon agave nectar 1/2 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1. Trim the fennel bulbs, peeling down the tough outer layer, and cut the green stalks down to about 2 inches.
FOOD
June 9, 2016
Makes 2 servings 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated lemon zest 1/4 teaspoon fine sea salt, plus extra as needed 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus extra as needed 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon each: fresh chives, fresh mint leaves, chopped 8 small to medium asparagus spears (see Notes), trimmed 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons unsalted butter 4 slices (1/2 inch each)
FOOD
May 2, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
With sugary, salty, addictive junk food everywhere, it's a challenge to persuade kids not to indulge. Of course, they've heard about eating fruits and vegetables. But in our healthy-cooking class at Lawton Elementary, I tried to appeal to their fifth-grade values: good looks, good grades, athletic prowess. Eating healthy food gives you more energy, makes you look better, helps your brain work better, makes your body respond better at sports, I told them. "It's like a car," I said.
FOOD
April 25, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
As the weather warms and the days lengthen, the long-awaited glory of spring has arrived with splashes of pink and yellow in the trees, with green leaves and buds bursting out all over. The gentle breezes beckon us outside, and colorful lighter fare beckons at the table. Paschal lamb and spring chickens are available at the market, but my tastes turn to veggies, especially the tender shoots, sprouts, and spears of spring. At this time of year, it's a snap to add a splash of brightness and pizzazz to every plate at every meal.
FOOD
February 14, 2014 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
Along with the drugstores' heart-shaped boxes, they should probably offer free first-aid kits on Valentine's Day, because no other holiday inspires so much well-meaning, overambitious, and underexperienced cooking. Still, if it doesn't send involved parties to the emergency room, the right home-cooked meal could be an important turning point in a relationship, the moment of dawning realization that this thing could actually last. Food legend is filled with such recipes - engagement chicken and marry-me lasagna and kiss-me kugel - dishes that are supposedly so delicious that they inspire proposals or at least romantic escalation.
FOOD
May 30, 2013
This is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat from May 28, 2013: Craig LaBan: It's been a good week for me, as you can see from this Crumb Tracker Quiz. Name the place I ate these dishes: (1) chu toro nigiri with tofu, ginger and chive; (2) crispy haloumi with poached figs; (3) lamb burger and fries with curry ketchup. I've got asparagus on the brain because we popped by amazing Terhune Orchards while in Princeton last weekend and found a "pick your own asparagus patch.
FOOD
May 2, 2013
Yumtown USA's Moroccan Beef Stew . . . 4 Turkey Chili . . . 2 Corn Bread . . . 2 Ziti, Asparagus, Fresh Tomato Sauce . . . 3 Quinoa Salad . . . 3
NEWS
June 24, 2012 | Freelance
Karen Rile   is a writer and teacher living in Chestnut Hill   When I was growing up, I rarely met a vegetable that wasn't canned. The Green Giant brought us mushy peas, army-green beans, and zucchini that squeaked when you chewed it. I had nightmares about that creepy, chlorophyll-deprived "French" asparagus floating in a jar in our West Mount Airy pantry, like a Mütter Museum specimen.   I didn't encounter fresh asparagus until college, in the late '70s.
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | Craig LaBan
For the pickled mushrooms: 2 quart containers of honshimeji mushrooms; a mix of brown and white is preferred 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 head of garlic, top trimmed 3 branches thyme 1 tablespoon coriander, crushed 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 quart mushroom or vegetable stock (store-bought stock is fine) 1/4 cup sherry vinegar For the onion puree: 2 large onions, peeled, diced fine 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup milk To finish: 1 bunch pencil asparagus, cut into one-inch pieces 2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper to taste 2 tablespoons shallots, chopped 2 tablespoons chopped tarragon or chives 1. Quickly blanch the mushrooms in boiling, salted water for a minute.
NEWS
March 29, 2012 | Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
This classic pairing of asparagus and poached egg is such a lovely weeknight dinner, especially as a herald to spring. It's not something I would make on a weeknight for the kids, I will confess, too challenging to poach all those eggs. But it is perfect supper for one or two. Though it is a few steps, the results are well worth the effort. This recipe, from Jane Hornby's newest offering, Fresh & Easy: What to Cook & How to Cook It, adds a sauce of balsamic vinegar and butter to the asparagus, for a spot-on finishing touch.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
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