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Asparagus

FOOD
May 13, 1992 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
It's prime time for asparagus and other spring crops from fields around the Philadelphia area. "The New Jersey asparagus is absolutely beautiful," said Al Buehrer, whose Indian Rock Produce firm in Horsham supplies prime produce to hotels, restaurants and specialty retailers here and in New York. Asparagus was found at prices from $1.29 to $1.99 a pound in area markets this week. The market is strong on asparagus, said Buehrer, and prices should be fairly steady, though somewhat higher than usual because the harvest from Washington (a major source of supply)
FOOD
June 21, 1989 | By Karen Gillingham, Special to The Inquirer
With spring giving way to summer, it's a good time to get in some cooking of foods in season, before they become foods out of season. Asparagus, for example. Asparagus is widely available for many months of the year, even though it's best as a spring vegetable. But before its price gets out of hand, think about some of its delicious and quick variations. Steam or simmer it only as long as necessary; it should still have a little bite to it. Then consider making it the central ingredient in Warm Asparagus With Pistachio Vinaigrette.
FOOD
June 18, 1986 | By JACQUELINE WIRTH, Special to the Daily News
Asparagus is one of the most elegant of vegetables. Its price during much of the year makes it a special-occasion treat. Asparagus is in our markets now but before you freeze some for later on find out where it was grown. Much of what we see is from California; it's good fresh but probably too old to freeze well. If you find freshly-cut local asparagus you'll have something worth freezing. Select asparagus with tender, tightly closed tips and a large proportion of green to white.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
GIVING GREEN THUMBS DOWN TO PICKINESS OVER PICKING Welfare recipients beware! When the asparagus gets tender, the Dutch plan to get tough. In the cash-strapped welfare state's first foray into compulsory workfare, the Dutch are planning to offer 650 jobs in next season's asparagus harvest to unemployed citizens. "If people don't take them, their benefits will be cut," said Peter Hermans, who runs the project. "People don't want to be asparagus pickers, because you have to bend down all day, the pay often isn't up to scratch, and you have to get up at dawn," Hermans said.
FOOD
April 6, 1988 | By Faye Levy, Special to The Inquirer
Spring has long been a popular word on menus. It evokes pleasant images of freshness, new life and an abundance of vegetables. In France, menus feature dishes a la printaniere, meaning a selection of spring vegetables is served around or alongside the main course. Traditionally this accompaniment included tender green peas, asparagus tips, new carrots, new turnips and baby onions. However, the term has been extended to mean a choice of colorful vegetables, of which some should be at the height of their season in spring but others may not be. Pasta primavera (primavera means spring in Italian)
FOOD
May 2, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
With sugary, salty, addictive junk food everywhere, it's a challenge to persuade kids not to indulge. Of course, they've heard about eating fruits and vegetables. But in our healthy-cooking class at Lawton Elementary, I tried to appeal to their fifth-grade values: good looks, good grades, athletic prowess. Eating healthy food gives you more energy, makes you look better, helps your brain work better, makes your body respond better at sports, I told them. "It's like a car," I said.
NEWS
July 17, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Grace Rowe Walton, 90, a feisty Moorestown truck farmer who spearheaded the restoration of the historical Mount Laurel Friends Meetinghouse, died July 2 at Medford Leas, a Quaker retirement home in Medford, N.J. Mrs. Walton, who grew up on a dairy farm near Yardley, Pa., graduated from the George School in 1932. After earning a bachelor's degree in physical education in 1936 from Temple University, she taught at Emporium (Pa.) High School, where she coached a championship women's basketball team.
FOOD
July 3, 2008 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not that you need an excuse to eat more watermelon, but it does have 40 percent more of the antioxidant lycopene than tomatoes. Plus, according to the USDA, watermelon is fat-free and a good source of vitamins A, B6, C and thiamin. But picking a ripe melon can be tricky. If only you could taste it before buying. "I love watermelon, and I taste away when I'm shopping for it," says Jimmy Iovine of Iovine Brothers Produce in the Reading Terminal Market. He's been selling watermelons from Florida and Georgia lately, but the Jersey crop should be in this week, he says.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
YOU CAN BE TOO THIN Parents, give your young daughters a lot of support and positive feedback. So urges researcher Andrew Hill, who says a quarter of girls as young as 9 that he surveyed wanted to diet, even though half of them were not overweight. A behavioral scientist at Britain's Leeds University, Hill found that dieting 9-year-olds, most of whom suffer from low self-esteem, were eating 11 percent fewer calories than the amount recommended for their age. That's very disturbing because rigid dieting can stunt the physical and hormonal changes of puberty.
NEWS
April 24, 1994 | By Joseph Yaskin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Meet Bob Langlois, retired Rutgers University agricultural extension agent - and asparagus wonk. As Gloucester County extension agent from 1962 until his retirement four years ago, Langlois provided information and advice to hundreds of farmers here and in surrounding counties. He served the region's agricultural community so well that he has been honored with a host of awards, including the New Jersey Board of Agriculture Distinguished Service Award, which he received in January.
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