CollectionsAsparagus
IN THE NEWS

Asparagus

NEWS
June 3, 2003 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Forget simmering worries that the Phillies may have to wait till next year. There are more serious predictions threatening a joyous and bounteous summer. No locally grown sweet corn by the Fourth of July. Fewer local tomatoes for picnics on the Fourth. Fewer local strawberries for early June church festivals. Three fine traditions in danger of being washed out. Throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey, the damp, chilly May cast a pall over farmland that normally heaps roadside stands with the makings of wonderful summer meals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2002 | By LAUREN McCUTCHEON For the Daily News
For 85 years, shoppers at the Italian Market have been lining up outside Sarcone's to buy the bakery's fresh bread. But until about five years ago, Sarcone's customers had to take their bread home to make their own sandwiches. Now Sarcone grandson Anthony Bucci makes hot and cold hoagies just a few doors away. Deli owner Bucci has dedicated many of his subs to his heroes: his grandfather Sarcone, his Uncle Louie, his dad Sonny, his son Sonny Jr. - even Sinatra. But he named his favorite after himself: "The Booch.
FOOD
April 5, 2000 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
California easily outgrows New Jersey in asparagus, with harvests from 30,000 acres and about 70 percent of the national crop, compared with the 1,000 acres planted in the Garden State. Still, New Jersey remains at the heart and soul - and future - of asparagus growth. The Jersey Giant hybrid is the most widely used variety in the country. And another seed developed at Rutgers - the Jersey Supreme - is likely to hold that distinction several years hence. "We will be releasing the new seed to growers this year," said Steve Garrison, a specialist in vegetable crops with Rutgers Cooperative Extension.
FOOD
April 4, 1999 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When April comes to Chateau du Fey, its grumpy gardener emerges from the hibernation of his musty cottage. Like the buds of his blossoming fruit trees, he begins to shed the month's early frost. All is well with spring and Monsieur Roger Milbert: The asparagus is on the rise. "When the asparagus finally shot up out of the ground, you would have thought company was coming," writes Amanda Hesser in her lyrical cookbook-memoir, The Cook and the Gardener (Norton). "Monsieur Milbert's expression brightened, he stood up straighter, he weeded, he raked, he even got his hair trimmed and noticeably bathed.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At age 31, artist Michael Doyle is committed to painting a single subject - and it's not the Western desert or the rocky coast of Maine. Doyle's subject doesn't seem that picturesque: It is a South Jersey farm operated by four spry sisters in their 80s. The sisters - Emma, Elizabeth and Christine Kugler and Sophie Kugler DeZwart - have lived on the farm in East Greenwich Township, Gloucester County, all their lives. To visitors, they recite the crops they used to grow: cantaloupes, peppers, tomatoes, corn, sweet potatoes and hay. Now, they like to say, they have a resident artist.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At age 31, artist Michael Doyle is committed to painting a single subject - and it's not the Western desert or the rocky coast of Maine. Doyle's subject doesn't seem that picturesque: It is a South Jersey farm operated by four spry sisters in their 80s. The sisters - Emma, Elizabeth and Christine Kugler and Sophie Kugler DeZwart - have lived on the farm in East Greenwich Township, all their lives. To visitors, they recite the crops they used to grow: cantaloupes, peppers, tomatoes, corn, sweet potatoes and hay. Now, they like to say, they have a resident artist.
NEWS
February 13, 1998 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
Baba Taiye Renfrow is a major player in the black professional social scene. He knows where the in-crowd is hanging this week and where it's headed the next. If there's a party going on, Renfrow's there. Renfrow, 28, first blazed his way into Philly's social scene back in the early '90s, when he staged a number of large parties in the Penn Tower Hotel and at First District Plaza. Then, last year, Renfrow organized several First Fridays for black professionals before selling his mailing list to a competitor.
NEWS
May 28, 1997 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
The only thing South Jersey has more of than Italian restaurants is diners. Many of these Italian eateries are cut from the same cloth - one crowd-pleasing Amer-Italian bistro is virtually indistinguishable from another. Which makes Giumarello's that much more of a find. This Haddon Heights restaurant is more than a cut above the crowd, as we found out during a recent weeknight visit. Located in what was once a private home (and later a hair salon, Giumarello's is a family affair for chef/owner Sam Giumarello, 30. His mother Rosemary, his wife Jennifer, and his brother Gian are all busy in either the front or back of the house.
FOOD
May 11, 1997 | By Joan Drake, FOR THE INQUIRER
Pan-searing is a fast method of cooking salmon that seals in the juices and creates a crisp, golden top crust. The technique calls for a well-seasoned cast-iron skillet, and, because such high heat is used, a spatter guard to cover the pan and an exhaust fan to handle the steam and smoke are recommended. By heating the skillet empty, you reduce the oil needed to coat the bottom to only a teaspoon. If you prefer salmon rare in the center, you can reduce even the cooking time. If you don't find hazelnuts in the baking section of the supermarket, buy them at a health food store.
FOOD
May 7, 1997 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Given the usual poetic descriptions of asparagus, you might think it's just a pretty face in the produce department. Not so. Asparagus isn't a nutrition lightweight. There's a lot of interest now in folate, a B vitamin that is a possible preventive for neural-tube defects in babies. A serving of six asparagus spears supplies about two-thirds of the folate that adult women should have each day. That serving also has more than 10 percent of the vitamin C that adults need every day and contributes some dietary fiber and iron as well.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|