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NEWS
June 12, 2009 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
No matter how many times we've heard Philadelphia described as William Penn's "greene countrie towne," we know the reality is rather different. Cities are cities because once-verdant land is relentlessly paved and covered over time. That's how we civilize our world. It's also how we mess it up. Every time the skies let forth a deluge, as they did with particular intensity this week, the city's asphalt-sealed streets and parking lots become churning torrents. The rain cascades to the nearest sewer outlet, picking up salts and oils along the way and overwhelming the underground system.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, Special to The Inquirer
It started in spring 1989. Some Pine Hill residents began to notice that trees in a wooded area behind their homes were being cut down and that huge chunks of broken asphalt had begun piling up on a 50-acre site at Cross Keys Road and Atlantic Avenue. The property, owned by Charles DeSorte of DeSorte Associates, a supplier of asphalt for road construction and repairs, was beginning to look like a dump site for discarded debris, said Robert Blew, a Pine Hill resident whose property abuts the site.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | By Sandra Sardella, Special to The Inquirer
Amid allegations that Monroe Township overspent thousands of taxpayer dollars on asphalt purchases, officials are trying to learn how much would have been saved had the township participated in a county purchasing plan. Earlier this month, the township commissioned a study of asphalt purchases made since 1988. The move was spurred by county roads director Joseph LaPorta, who said that $100,000 too much was spent because supply contracts were not awarded by bid. Public Works Director James Agnesino said last week that the township learned only this year that a purchasing contract with the county had expired in 1989.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Jonathan Berr, Special to The Inquirer
More than 20 Sunset Avenue residents voiced displeasure at a Chalfont Borough Council meeting Tuesday over plans by an asphalt contractor to move into their neighborhood. The residents said they were surprised to learn that the Chalfont Planning Commission had recently given preliminary approval to a plan by American Quality Construction Co. to establish its headquarters on Sunset Avenue. Dave Schutt of 115 Sunset Ave. said that neighborhood residents did not learn about the asphalt contractor's plans until last week and would do all they could to prevent the move.
NEWS
February 2, 1990 | By Stephen Keating, Special to The Inquirer
Citizens Against Pollution (CAP), a newly formed local environmental group, petitioned the West Deptford Township Committee last night to block future operation of a 10,000-barrel asphalt storage tank at the Coastal Eagle Point Oil Refinery on Route 130. The tank, built and operated by Coastal in August without Planning Board approval, has raised a storm of controversy over the last five months. The township shut down the tank in September and fined the Houston-based oil company $5,000.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
NuStar Energy L.P. has sold the remaining half of its money-losing asphalt business to its joint-venture partner, Lindsay Goldberg L.L.C. The sale includes the former Citgo refinery in Paulsboro. NuStar, based in San Antonio, Texas, acquired the asphalt business from Citgo in 2008, but the business turned sour with the economic collapse and a drop in demand for asphalt, which is used for paving and in roofing material. "It's been a big drag on the bottom-line results of this company," Curtis V. Anastasio, NuStar's then-chief executive, told analysts in November.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sure, the Flyers rule the ice, gap toothed and grim in their determination to win the Stanley Cup over that bunch from Detroit. But this isn't ice, and Lindros & Co. aren't here, not on this late afternoon, not on this contested patch of Center City asphalt. And not on this four-member squad, where an investment banker, computer consultant, jewelry maker and aspiring hockey star - ages 27, 41, 18 and 8, respectively - circle and spin around two squashed trash cans. They have wheels on their feet, fire in their eyes.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Ownership of another Philadelphia-area refinery is about to change. NuStar Energy L.P. said it would sell 50 percent of its asphalt operations, which include refineries in Paulsboro, N.J., and Savannah, Ga., to a joint venture in a transaction expected to be completed by Sept. 30. Lindsay Goldberg L.L.C., a New York private-equity firm with $10 billion under management, will pay $175 million for a 50 percent interest in the joint venture, with San Antonio-based NuStar holding the other 50 percent stake.
NEWS
February 24, 1996
Mother Nature has supplied the perfect formula (snow-rain-ice-thaw-snow-cold-thaw) to create a lifetime's worth of potholes in one spring. Reports of cars disappearing in some of these potholes are erroneous. State experts explain that a hole big enough to swallow a car is no longer called a pothole. It's called a cave-in. Whatever, the highway people say their people are out there filling the worst craters as soon as possible after they erupt, or disrupt. Perhaps some facts can defuse the good-humored cynicism of Inquirer letter writer Rosemarie Allen, who wondered - given Mayor Rendell's philosophy on blizzards and side streets - whether His Honor's pothole solution would be "piles of free macadam for neighborhood residents" to shovel themselves.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A Bridgeton asphalt company that Gloucester County freeholders sued last year, alleging fraudulent billing, will pay $40,000 to settle the lawsuit, according to attorneys for the county. In the settlement, South State Inc., a vendor of highway construction materials, and the Board of Freeholders have agreed to drop the civil action against each other regarding the purchase and delivery of asphalt and an oil, called tack, applied between layers of blacktop. The county accused the company in August 1998 of delivering low-bid specifications to the highway department and then overcharging for the delivery of asphalt once it was awarded the bid. According to the lawsuit, which had sought an unspecified amount in compensatory damages, the fraud took place between 1983 and 1994.
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NEWS
February 23, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Irene Madrak, executive director of the North Light Community Center in Manayunk, was having nightmares about a dream playground turning into a giant bowl of mulch soup. Her dilemma began when KaBoom! - the company that builds playgrounds in a day with the help of community volunteers - offered one to North Light, which has delivered social services to families and kids since 1938 on Green Lane near Wilde Street. "If we wanted a new KaBoom! playground," Madrak said, "we had to remove our old playground and 2,500 square feet of asphalt.
REAL_ESTATE
December 1, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
If it's snowing this morning, do not attempt to do what I'm about to tell you. If it's not snowing, then it's time - some would say it's way past the time - to check out your roof before the start of meteorological winter Monday. Winter weather can be especially hard on roofs. Identifying potential weaknesses in yours now can save you money in the future, the experts say. If your roof has asphalt shingles - I just looked up and down my street, and every house has them, including mine and my garage - the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association recommends a roof audit.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
NuStar Energy L.P. has sold the remaining half of its money-losing asphalt business to its joint-venture partner, Lindsay Goldberg L.L.C. The sale includes the former Citgo refinery in Paulsboro. NuStar, based in San Antonio, Texas, acquired the asphalt business from Citgo in 2008, but the business turned sour with the economic collapse and a drop in demand for asphalt, which is used for paving and in roofing material. "It's been a big drag on the bottom-line results of this company," Curtis V. Anastasio, NuStar's then-chief executive, told analysts in November.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Ownership of another Philadelphia-area refinery is about to change. NuStar Energy L.P. said it would sell 50 percent of its asphalt operations, which include refineries in Paulsboro, N.J., and Savannah, Ga., to a joint venture in a transaction expected to be completed by Sept. 30. Lindsay Goldberg L.L.C., a New York private-equity firm with $10 billion under management, will pay $175 million for a 50 percent interest in the joint venture, with San Antonio-based NuStar holding the other 50 percent stake.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
The official temperature was in the mid-90s, but the unofficial reading was about 200 degrees Fahrenheit on the blacktop cauldron where Steve Wilson and his colleagues were earning their pay Thursday. "You can actually feel the heat coming off the asphalt," said Peter Scerati Jr., the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation on-site manager in charge of the road-repair crew, who would end up having an adventurous afternoon in Montgomery County. Sun-absorbing asphalt is a prime contributor to the "heat island" effect that makes urbanized areas all the more unbearable during hot spells.
NEWS
June 23, 2010 | By KIRSTINLINDERMAYER
  THE PROBLEM: In April, a visitor to the City Howl Web site ( www.thecityhowl.net ) posted an unfavorable review of the Streets Department, citing the number of unrepaired potholes in South Philly. The stretch of Oregon Avenue between 9th and 24th streets, the user wrote, was especially bad, filled with "not just potholes, but sink holes. " WHAT WE DID: We started by taking a ride along Oregon between 9th and 24th in early May. We didn't find much, other than one long stretch of holes between 21st and 22nd streets that had been almost entirely repaired.
NEWS
February 18, 2010 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After the recent bad weather, Mayor Nutter knew that getting people excited about putting white stuff on their roofs might be a tough sell. "But this is a different kind of material," he said with a brief laugh yesterday. He was talking not about snow, but about reflective coatings - the kind that could turn Philadelphia's rooftops from a sea of searing black to an ocean of cool white. Nutter was launching a citywide block contest to promote the coatings, which not only can make a house cooler but also, according to the latest research, potentially can make entire neighborhoods and cities cooler.
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Sam Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The number of bicyclists using Pine and Spruce Streets in Center City has nearly doubled since temporary bike lanes were added in September, according to the Bicycle Coalition of Philadelphia. Volunteers measured bike traffic at four intersection before and after the traffic stripes were added to transfer a car lane's worth of asphalt to bicyclists. According to the coalition, westbound bike traffic on Spruce Street rose by 85 percent while eastbound bike traffic on Pine Street grew by 112 percent.
NEWS
November 6, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The University of Pennsylvania will begin construction today of its epic 24-acre Penn Park, the centerpiece of its 30-year master plan involving land it acquired from the U.S. Postal Service in 2004. The $46 million riverfront development project on the eastern edge of campus will include athletic fields, tennis courts, bike trails, and a multilevel elevated walk. It will increase the urban university's green space by 20 percent. Replacing bland asphalt lots and an old industrial site, the project will help to transform the landscape of West Philadelphia, and link the university's main campus with bustling Center City.
NEWS
August 8, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Was it music? Was it intentional? Accidental? Those were the questions from passengers lined up for Track 7 at lunchtime yesterday at 30th Street Station when New York City's Asphalt Orchestra launched a guerrilla-style debut in Philadelphia. Cameras were fished out of bags. Eyes squinted toward the area between the Quik-Trak machines and the men's washroom as the intricacies of Frank Zappa's nervy and intense "Zomby Woof" bounced around the station's ultra-live acoustic. "It's good, but, my God, it's overpowering," said one retirement-age woman from Connecticut (who asked not to be named)
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