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Aspirin

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NEWS
November 20, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
People experiencing the sharp chest pain of angina can receive care at a community hospital using aspirin and other common drugs that work as well as high-tech treatments at a large medical center, according to a study released yesterday. Unstable angina, which strikes 750,000 Americans annually, is the leading cause of admissions to hospital coronary-care units. Angina pain often signals that insufficient blood is reaching the heart, and can lead to a heart attack and death. According to the study, patients treated with aspirin and other common drugs fared as well as those who received expensive clot-busting drugs and those who receive an angioplasty, in which skinny balloons are inserted to open clogged arteries.
FOOD
September 30, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Take two aspirin and weigh me in the morning: Aspirin may soon be part of the "cure" for overweight. According to the latest research, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, aspirin combined with another drug ephedrine (found in over-the-counter asthma and bronchial medications), seems to raise the calorie-burning metabolism of laboratory mice. Aspirin by itself had no effect, but in combination it reduced the body fat of genetically obese mice. More news and views from the medical and professional journals: Fat women use more energy than lean women but lean women work harder at their tasks, indicate findings of another research project reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
NEWS
May 27, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: Can you tell me what it is about aspirin that causes stomach ulcers when used over a prolonged period? If aspirin causes stomach ulcers, what does enteric-coated aspirin do to the intestines? A: Aspirin and drugs like it (such as Motrin, Indocin, Lodine, Feldene and Voltaren) can, with prolonged use, cause gastric irritation and bleeding. This is due to direct contact between the drug and the stomach lining, but also - more importantly - because these drugs inhibit the manufacture of prostaglandin.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug. Aspirin seemed to make no difference in patients who did not have the mutations.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
Although several studies have shown that an aspirin a day can keep a heart attack away, neither the American Heart Association nor the American College of Cardiologists is in favor of all Americans adding an aspirin per day to their diet. Does that surprise you? This is certainly not the message one gets from current ads touting aspirin on TV. Nor from the recent report that Gov. Casey's physicians have prescribed an aspirin a day for him as he recovers from heart surgery.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The man loitering outside Room 130 of the Media Mini Motel offered the would-be buyer a deal - a "line" of cocaine for only $20. But the deal had a few flaws. The drug was actually crushed aspirin. And the buyer was really an undercover cop. Though the seller, David Millhouse, 23, of Media, was guilty of not choosing his customers wisely, you might think he could not get in too much trouble for selling an item that multitudes take every day to calm headaches, muscle pain and fevers.
FOOD
July 15, 1992 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Is it true that an aspirin dissolved in a vase of water will help to preserve cut flowers? - Mary Lou So far as I've been able to determine, this is an old wives' tale and the aspirin will not help. However, I'm told that a little tonic water added to the tap water in the vase will act as a preservative. Make sure you use water labeled "tonic" water, not club soda, as it has added ingredients that club soda does not. Tonic is available in the carbonated beverage aisle at the supermarket.
NEWS
February 18, 1988 | BY CAL THOMAS
The makers of aspirin are ecstatic over a recent medical report that indicates an aspirin a day may keep heart attacks away and prevent a recurrence in those who have already had one. That is typical of the Johnny-come-lately responses to major health problems in the United States. If we really wanted to prevent heart attacks, we would change our behavior: eliminate high-fat foods from our diet, exercise regularly, reduce stress. But that's the way medicine and government respond to maladies.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By JOANNE SILLS, Daily News Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania veterinarian advised caution yesterday to dog and cat owners thinking about using aspirin to treat or prevent heart disease in their pets. The long-standing dictum not to give your pet aspirin - and never aspirin substitutes - is still true, according to Dr. Rebecca Kirby, director of emergency service at the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. "Everything stated in the report was true," said Kirby of the study, published in this month's Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine.
NEWS
July 24, 1991 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women may significantly reduce their chance of heart attack if they take between one and six aspirins a week, a major new study concludes. The study, in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), reported that women over age 50 who regularly used aspirin were 32 percent less likely to suffer a first heart attack, and that female aspirin-users of all ages reduced their risk of heart attack by a fourth. Even women who smoked, had a history of high blood pressure or high cholesterol levels experienced a "large reduction" in heart attack risk if they took aspirins, reported the study - a surprising finding that one researcher suggested be downplayed so that women would not jump to the conclusion that aspirin could take the place of good health habits.
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BUSINESS
July 9, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Customs conversation is often the same for Kemal Malik, who carries a United Kingdom passport as a top executive for the German-based global giant Bayer AG. The agent will ask Malik what company he works for. Malik: "Bayer. " Agent: "Oh, the aspirin company. " "That's what we are known for, and that's great," Malik said in Philadelphia recently at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting. "But we want to be known for other stuff and we have that opportunity.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
At Martin O'Riordan's cardiology practice in Darby and Springfield, it happens weekly. A 45- or 50-year-old patient mentions that her father had a heart attack at the same age. Worried that the same fate will befall her despite being in good health, she takes baby aspirin every day. O'Riordan's typical response: Please stop. Physicians have known for decades that daily, low-dose aspirin makes sense for patients who have had a heart attack or stroke, as it sharply reduces the chance of having a second one. But for people who have never had one of these cardiovascular "events," the thinking on aspirin is less clear, despite two recent large-scale studies.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The seven patients all had had successful surgery to prop open a blocked coronary artery with a stent. Yet more than five years later, all seven developed dangerous blood clots and came to Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with heart attacks. The common thread? All of them either had stopped taking aspirin, were actively smoking, or both, according to a new report by Jefferson physicians. Not a good idea, the doctors wrote in September's Journal of Invasive Cardiology.
NEWS
April 20, 2013
Garret FitzGerald, chair of the pharmacology department at the University of Pennsylvania, has been awarded the 2013 Grand Prix Scientifique, considered the world's most prestigious honor for cardiovascular research. FitzGerald shares the prize with Carlo Patrono, chair of pharmacology at Catholic University in Rome, for their work showing that low-dose aspirin can help prevent cardiovascular disease. The prize, valued at 500,000 euros ($650,000), will be awarded under the presidency of the chancellor of the Institut de France and the president of the French Academy of Sciences on June 5. In a statement, FitzGerald said he was delighted to receive the prize and to share it with Patrono, "a special friend for more than 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2013
If you're worried about the recent study linking aspirin use to an age-related disease that leads to blindness , specialists at Wills Eye Institute have some reassuring advice. The Australian study, published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine, found that taking aspirin at least once a week more than doubled the chance of macular degeneration, including the more damaging "wet" type, among 2,389 adults followed for 15 years. But the 15-year incidence was still relatively small - about 5.8 percent of regular aspirin users compared with 2.2 percent of nonusers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
One of the enduring tragedies of fair Ireland, beset by recurring economic woes, is that it loses many of its best and brightest, who, in search of opportunity, emigrate, most often to the United States. A sterling example of this brain drain is Garret FitzGerald, who was born in Dublin, and came here the first time at age 18 to take a summer job driving a Coca-Cola truck. Since then, he has risen fast and far. After earning his medical degree at University College in Dublin, FitzGerald eventually returned to the United States and during the 1980s ran the clinical pharmacology division at Vanderbilt University.
NEWS
December 6, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bucking conventional wisdom, a University of Pennsylvania study concludes that natural resistance to the heart-protective effects of aspirin is rare, and questions the value of increasingly widely used screening tests for aspirin resistance. The study also found that coated aspirin pills, touted as being easier on the stomach, can throw off the tests, which measure how much aspirin reduces the formation of blood clots. "The incidence of true aspirin resistance is vanishingly small, and the idea of testing for it is seriously undermined by this study," said senior author Garret A. FitzGerald, an expert on blood clotting.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Aspirin, one of the world's oldest and cheapest drugs, has shown remarkable promise in treating colon cancer in people with mutations in a gene that's thought to play a role in the disease. Among patients with the mutations, those who regularly took aspirin lived longer than those who didn't, a major study found. Five years after their cancers were diagnosed, 97 percent of the aspirin users were still alive versus 74 percent of those not taking the drug. Aspirin seemed to make no difference in patients who did not have the mutations.
NEWS
May 28, 2012 | Tom Avril
The best way for a patient to understand what happens in a heart attack is not to have one at all, but to have the doctor simulate it on a computer. That is the idea behind new research at the University of Pennsylvania, in which scientists created computer models of the blood of three volunteers and correctly predicted their response to various anticlotting medications. In one case, they were able to determine that a donor's blood would have no response to aspirin, and indeed that person turned out to have a previously unknown genetic mutation that caused exactly that problem.
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