CollectionsAssad
IN THE NEWS

Assad

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 12, 2012 | By Christopher Torchia, Associated Press
ISTANBUL, Turkey - The Syrian ambassador to Iraq has defected, denouncing President Bashar al-Assad in a TV statement Wednesday, becoming the most senior diplomat to abandon the regime during a bloody 16-month uprising. Nawaf Fares, a former provincial governor, is the second prominent Syrian to break with the regime in less than a week. Brig. Gen. Manaf Tlass, an Assad confidant and son of a former defense minister, fled Syria last week, buoying Western powers and anti-regime activists, who expressed hope that other high-ranking defections would follow.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Bradley Klapper and Elaine Ganley, Associated Press
PARIS - A top Syrian general's defection is the first major crack in the upper echelons of President Bashar al-Assad's regime, buoying a 100-nation conference Friday meant to intensify pressure for his removal, as well as an opposition desperate to bring him down but frustrated by diplomatic efforts. All hoped the defection of Brig. Gen. Manaf Tlass, an Assad confidant and son of a former defense minister who helped ease Assad into power, would have a snowball effect on his elite cohorts as Syrians count their dead - now more than 14,000.
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT - Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his allies are showing renewed confidence that the momentum in the civil war is shifting in their favor, due in part to the rapid rise of al-Qaeda-linked extremists among the rebels and the world's reluctance to take forceful action to intervene in the fighting. His invigorated regime has gone on the offensive - both on the ground and in its portrayal of the conflict as a choice between Assad and the extremists. Several factors appear to have convinced Assad he can weather the storm: Two years into the uprising against his family's iron rule, his regime remains firmly entrenched in Damascus, the defection rate from the military has dwindled, and key international supporters Russia and China are still solidly on his side.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Barbara Surk, Associated Press
BEIRUT - U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Monday expressed disappointment with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for rejecting the most important elements of an international road map to end the country's civil war - a political handover and establishment of a transitional governing body. Assad in a rare speech Sunday outlined his own vision for ending the country's conflict with a plan that would keep him in power. He also dismissed any chance of dialogue with the armed opposition and called on Syrians to fight what he called "murderous criminals.
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy and Zeina Karam, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - In his first interview since December, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad insisted Tuesday that his regime is fighting back against foreign mercenaries who want to overthrow him, not innocent Syrians aspiring for democracy in a yearlong uprising. The interview with Russian TV showed Assad is still standing his ground, despite widespread international condemnation over his deadly crackdown on dissent. "There are foreign mercenaries, some of them still alive," Assad said in an interview broadcast Wednesday on Russian state news channel Rossiya-24.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Thousands of Syrians rallied Thursday in Damascus in a display of loyalty to President Bashar al-Assad, waving flags under a slate-gray sky to protest the anniversary of a rebellion that the government says is driven by terrorists and gangsters. Outside the Syrian capital, however, tanks and snipers besieged opposition areas, including the southern city of Daraa, where the uprising began a year ago, touched off by the arrest of a group of youths who scrawled antiregime graffiti on a wall.
NEWS
September 24, 2012 | By Albert Aji and Zeina Karam, Associated Press
DAMASCUS, Syria - Syrian opposition figures who reject foreign intervention in Syria's 18-month conflict called for the ouster of President Bashar al-Assad at a rare meeting Sunday in the nation's capital. The gathering was tolerated by the regime in an apparent attempt to lend credibility to its claims that it remains open to political reform despite its bloody crackdown on dissent. A senior former Assad ally, meanwhile, said Iran is providing massive support for the embattled Syrian regime.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syria's neighbors have turned decisively against President Bashar al-Assad, launching a diplomatic campaign against his crackdown on the country's pro-democracy movement that analysts say could have a major effect on important pillars of Assad's support. Even as Syrian armed forces pushed against several opposition strongholds Monday, international action against the government mushroomed. Western countries so far have led efforts to stop the violent crackdown, including a U.N. Security Council statement last week that condemned the offensive.
NEWS
August 22, 2011 | By Hannah Allam and Ipek Yezdani, McClatchy Newspapers
CAIRO - Syrian President Bashar al-Assad on Sunday repeated promises of changes and warned of "repercussions" should the West intervene militarily in the uprising threatening his family's four-decade rule. Assad's remarks during a choreographed question-and-answer session that aired live on state TV did not diverge from the message his regime had sent since the rebellion started in the spring: Change is coming soon, the uprising is the work of militants, and interference from the West is an assault on Syria's sovereignty.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Syrian government's continued denial that it gassed its people - in the face of stark evidence to the contrary - reminds me of a chilling experience I had in Damascus in 1982. Rumors were flying that the regime of Hafez al-Assad had massacred at least 10,000 people in the city of Hama, but the government wouldn't let anyone near the site. As I waited in the office of Information Minister Ahmed Iskandar Ahmed, I was stunned to see a large painting on the wall portraying Hama's historic city center, with its famous water wheel in the foreground; this was the exact area that had been obliterated by government shells.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
ZAATARI CAMP, Jordan - When 13-year-old Majid fled with his family from southern Syria in 2013 to escape shelling by government forces, he left everything behind, including his dreams. Looking older than his 15 years, his face perspiring under dark stubble, a dirty green sweatshirt hanging loosely on his rangy frame, Majid spoke to me in his new home, a small, bare trailer in the Zaatari refugee camp near Mafraq, Jordan - now the second-largest refugee camp anywhere. Sitting on one of several floor mats, the only furniture in the trailer, he had just returned from a workday spent chopping stones to make gravel that could be used in concrete.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
While Europeans worry about those who have gone to Syria to train with ISIS, millions of Syrian children are at risk of becoming terrorist recruits. According to a 2014 report by UNICEF (the U.N. agency for children), at least three million children are displaced in Syria, and more than 1.2 million have fled to neighboring countries. They have been bombed and shelled, seen family members slaughtered, and are forced to live in camps or abandoned buildings. Half of them no longer have any schooling.
NEWS
June 9, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Late last month, an American from Florida blew himself up in a suicide attack in Syria. Here's the good news: Moner Mohammad Abusalha's truck bomb was aimed at Syrian government forces, not at some building in New York City. The bad news: As many as 70 Americans and 3,000 Europeans are among more than 7,000 foreigners from 50 countries fighting with Syrian rebel groups linked to al-Qaeda. Director of National Intelligence James Clapper says these groups are already training people "to go back to their [home]
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On Tuesday, the utter failure of White House efforts on Syria became embarrassingly public. Lakdhar Brahimi, the U.N. special envoy who had brokered Syrian peace talks in Geneva, quit in frustration. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon singled out Syrian government stonewalling as a key cause of failure. So much for administration hopes of finding a political solution. Also on Tuesday, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius made an undiplomatic public critique of President Obama's failure to use force as he had pledged if Assad used chemical weapons.
NEWS
May 5, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As he was traveling in Asia last week, President Obama let loose with a broadside against critics who say his foreign policy is too weak. "Why is it that everybody is so eager to use military force after we've just gone through a decade of war. . .?" he demanded at a news conference in Manila. "Many who were proponents of . . . a disastrous decision to go into Iraq haven't really learned the lesson of the last decade, and they keep on just playing the same note over and over. " His job as commander-in-chief, he added, is "to deploy military force [only]
NEWS
April 28, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
There's growing evidence that the Syrian regime has been gassing civilians again, sending helicopters to unload barrel bombs filled with canisters of chlorine on women and children. Chlorine gas, used to brutal effect in World War I, turns to hydrochloric acid in the lungs, which can lead to internal burning and drowning. But the gas was not on the list of chemical weapons banned by a U.S.-Russian accord in 2013. Clearly, Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad feels free to thumb his nose at the White House, despite the epic humanitarian crisis he's caused for Syria and its neighbors.
NEWS
March 31, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Dear President Obama: Last week, you were super-busy in Europe, warning Vladimir Putin not to invade eastern Ukraine. Meanwhile, Moscow's takeover of Crimea is a done deal, and there's even more worrying stuff going on elsewhere. Your CIA chief, John Brennan, just told a House panel that al-Qaeda central is now using Syrian territory to train Western jihadis to attack Europe and America. In Afghanistan (remember Afghanistan?), Taliban bombers are threatening this week's elections.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The Russian invasion of Ukraine should finally end the administration's fantasy that Moscow will help stop the war in Syria. And it ought to force the White House to forge a new strategy to deal with the most shocking humanitarian crisis of the century, which is spilling over from Syria to all of its neighbors. Otherwise, the level of human suffering will get much, much worse. U.S. officials have insisted for three years that there was no military solution in Syria; they clung to delusions that Russia would convince Bashar al-Assad to make way for a transitional government and free elections.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
To understand why President Obama's Syria policy has failed so badly, look no further than the brutal regime crackdown on political protesters in Ukraine. The link is Vladimir Putin. U.S. officials foolishly banked on the Russian leader to squeeze Syria's dictator into a political compromise at Geneva peace talks. But Putin - who prides himself on displays of bare-chested machismo - disdains political compromise. He prefers strongmen, whether in Syria, Ukraine, or elsewhere, and will back Bashar al-Assad, no matter his war crimes.
NEWS
January 31, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
D iplomacy , diplomacy , diplomacy . Partners , partners . These were the buzzwords President Obama hammered home in the foreign policy portion of his State of the Union address, as the core of his global strategy for the next three years. "America must move off a permanent war footing," he said. "I strongly believe our leadership and our security cannot depend on the military alone. " Instead, we have to build "the capacity of our foreign partners" and engage in "strong and principled diplomacy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|