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Assassination

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NEWS
November 18, 2001 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
R. Stewart Rauch, 87, a retired Philadelphia banking executive who helped bring together the city's business and black leaders to help calm unrest after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., died Friday in Beaumont Health Center in Bryn Mawr of complications from pneumonia. Mr. Rauch spent 26 years as an executive at PSFS. He was elected president in 1955 and served as chairman from 1971 to 1979. A lawyer and a leading figure in the city's business community, Mr. Rauch was approached by civil rights leaders to help improve race relations after King was killed on April 4, 1968.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In the white-knuckle thriller Vantage Point all eyes are on Salamanca, Spain, where leaders of the free world have convened for an antiterrorism summit. At high noon in Plaza Mayor, as U.S. President Ashton (William Hurt) strides to the podium to announce a signed treaty, he is felled by an assassin's bullet, frustrating the best efforts to curb terrorism. The ensuing chaos poses moral and mortal challenges for members of the president's security detail (Dennis Quaid and Matthew Fox)
NEWS
August 4, 1987 | By Mark Fineman, Los Angeles Times (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
Influential Philippine legislators demanded yesterday that the nation's military and law enforcement agencies be revamped as a result of the weekend assassination of cabinet minister Jaime Ferrer. Police said yesterday that they had no new leads in the Sunday night assassination of Ferrer, an outspoken anti-communist who, as secretary of local government, was one of the most powerful members of President Corazon C. Aquino's cabinet. He was the latest victim in a string of unsolved killings of prominent Filipinos, including the 1983 assassination of Aquino's husband, Benigno.
NEWS
May 29, 2008 | By George Curry
I want to believe Hillary Clinton when she says that her recent comment about Robert F. Kennedy being assassinated in June was a reference to the long primary season rather than the ever-present danger that Barack Obama faces. The problem with Clinton is that she is often her own worst enemy. She issued a statement saying, "The Kennedys have been much on my mind the last days because of Senator Kennedy and I regret that if my referencing that moment of trauma for our entire nation, and particularly for the Kennedy family, was in any way offensive.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christian broadcaster Pat Robertson yesterday apologized for calling for the assassination of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, after earlier saying his remarks had been misinterpreted. As Robertson's remarks further roiled political and religious waters, some evangelical leaders strongly rejected them as un-Christian, while others declined to criticize the comments. And the Rev. Ted Haggard, the leader of the nation's largest evangelical Christian group, said he was seeking a meeting with Chavez.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
For nearly three decades, James Earl Ray has been a despised man - convicted of the murder of the most celebrated African-American leader ever, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But with Ray - now 68 and suffering from kidney and liver damage in a Nashville, Tenn., hospital hasn't long to live - and many black leaders and civil- rights activists in Philadelphia and across the nation are hoping Ray hangs on a bit longer. The reason? They believe Ray has something still to say about allegations that there was actually a conspiracy to assassinate King, who was killed by a sniper as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
His name was Nathan Simms. His claim to history is summed up on his headstone in Bradford Cemetery in West Bradford. It reads: "Nathan Simms, 1851-1934. The slave boy who helped Booth escape the night of Lincoln's assassination, but told the Union soldiers the next day the direction Booth took, thus aiding in his capture. " The cemetery is not far from Simms' former home in Marshallton, where he lived in the early 1930s. The specifics of Simms' association with John Wilkes Booth have become a bit overblown in decades of storytelling.
NEWS
January 13, 2013 | By Jamie Stengle, Associated Press
DALLAS - Robert F. Kennedy Jr. is convinced a lone gunman wasn't solely responsible for the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, his uncle, and said his father believed the Warren Commission report was a "shoddy piece of craftsmanship. " Kennedy and his sister Rory spoke about their family Friday night during an interview with Charlie Rose at in Dallas. The event was part of observances marking the 50th anniversary of the president's death. Kennedy was killed Nov. 22, 1963, while riding in a motorcade through Dallas.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By Kathryn Quigley, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
When John Wilkes Booth assassinated President Abraham Lincoln in 1865, he did more than just shatter the life of a great leader. He shattered the fabric of his own family. That is the premise of The Brothers Booth, a new play that premieres tonight at the Bristol Riverside Theater. Playwright W. Stuart McDowell has written about this American tragedy from the viewpoint of Edwin Booth, the nation's most acclaimed actor of the time, he said. John Wilkes Booth and his brothers Edwin and Junius were "one of the greatest theatrical families at the time," said McDowell.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1991 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
More than 25 years after the fact, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy still provides fertile ground for conspiracy theorists. Was Lee Harvey Oswald a Soviet agent? An assassin sent by Fidel Castro? A pawn of organized crime? A deluded personality acting on his own? Such questions may never be answered, but their validity is made strikingly clear in a documentary from White Star Video called Reasonable Doubt (51 minutes, $29.95). Produced by Chip Selby in 1988 (the 25th anniversary of the slaying)
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NEWS
April 13, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Through an open door came the sound of labored, heavy breathing and groans as President Abraham Lincoln lay dying from a gunshot wound to the head. First lady Mary Todd Lincoln passed from the room into a hallway, moaning with inconsolable grief, "O, my God, and have I given my husband to die?" The long death vigil at the Petersen House in Washington unfolded before James Tanner, who'd been summoned to record the testimony of witnesses to the assassination at Ford's Theatre. Though not widely known, Tanner's shorthand and transcribed cursive from the night of April 14, 1865, and morning of April 15, 1865, survived and are kept in an acid-free box in a vault at the Union League of Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 25, 2015
The "Consumer 15.0" column Sunday incorrectly included Philadelphia among cities where large-scale rioting occurred in 1968 after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
NEWS
November 14, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the hours after his arrest, Eric Frein allegedly told detectives that he ambushed a state police barracks in the Poconos because he wanted to "wake people up" about his concerns over the government. He also described his killing of a state police corporal as an "assassination," according to an updated list of charges filed in court late Thursday afternoon. He shot the corporal because "he wanted to make a change" in government and believed "that voting was insufficient to do so, because there was no one worth voting for," investigators wrote in the newly filed court records.
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
By almost any measure, it's safe to say William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. has had a remarkable legal career. First in his class at Harvard Law School in 1946. First African American to serve as a clerk for a Supreme Court justice. Transportation Secretary under President Gerald R. Ford, adviser to nine other presidents, and, finally, a corporate lawyer who routinely pulled down fees of $1,200 an hour. Coleman, a Philadelphia native, also was the first African American to go to work for an old-line Philadelphia law firm, single-handedly breaking the color barrier of the city's legal establishment.
NEWS
November 23, 2013 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The terrible tumult of that weekend 50 years ago, one that repelled, riveted, and ultimately reshaped a nation, began in Philadelphia with an ominous hush. Just past 1:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 22, 1963, Fred Donaldson, a 22-year-old rewrite man at the Evening Bulletin, checked the newsroom's bank of 11 teletype machines. Strangely, that formidable wall of noise, typically clattering with news reports, had gone eerily silent. "It was something I'd never seen before," Donaldson recalled last week.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
BECAUSE NOV. 22, 1963 is one of the truly epochal dates in American history, it's difficult to think of it in terms of anything but the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. But scanning the eight-star final edition of that day's Daily News vividly illustrates how Philadelphia was a very different place 50 years ago. * Among the most notable changes is the Daily News itself. It was almost 50 percent longer than today (15 inches versus 10 7/8 inches) and cost 8 cents.
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE SHEER number of movies about JFK attest to Hollywood's fascination with his life and death - a fascination that began even before he became president in 1961. Then-Sen. John F. Kennedy was a model for the handsome young Irish-American war hero/politician who defeats veteran mayor Spencer Tracy in John Ford's "The Last Hurrah," released in 1958. Once elected president, the image-savvy Kennedy helped forge his own myth - his administration worked with Hollywood in approving and developing "PT- 109" (1963)
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THE BULLETS that struck and killed President John F. Kennedy in Dallas' Dealey Plaza on Nov. 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. CST, echoed around the world – but the reverberations were especially loud in Philadelphia. Like so much about the JFK assassination, the connections aren't always on the surface. After all, Kennedy was the product of a Boston dynasty, slain on a Texas street - allegedly by an assassin who'd drifted around the globe. But in just a few years, the 35th president had forged a surprisingly deep bond with the City of Brotherly Love.
NEWS
November 21, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the world this week mourned the 50th anniversary of her great-uncle's assassination, the newest Kennedy was born at the Jersey Shore. Nora Kara Kennedy was born 3:11 p.m. Tuesday at AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center-Mainland Campus, the daughter of former U.S. Rep. Patrick Kennedy and his wife, Amy. Nora weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces and measured 18¼ inches. Nora's birth comes three days before the anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the 35th president and her great-uncle.
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