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Assembly Line

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NEWS
September 23, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Margaret E. Pickering Tufo, 68, of Fairless Hills, Bucks County, a retired assembly-line worker and delivery person for The Inquirer, died Wednesday at Frankford Hospital's Bucks County Campus in Fairless Hills after a long illness. For many years, she was an assembler for Keystone Pen Co. in Tullytown, Bucks County. She also had been a Bucks County route delivery person for The Inquirer during the late 1970s and early 1980s. Born in Philadelphia and educated in local parochial schools, Mrs. Tufo traveled across much of the United States as a Navy wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1992 | By Robert G. Seidenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a youngster, Ben Hamper had full warning of what it was going to be like in the world of work. His father, "a five-star drunk with the ambition of an eggplant," had a job installing windshields at a General Motors plant in Flint, Mich. "Car, windshield. Car, windshield. No wonder my father preferred playin' hopscotch with barmaids," he writes. Hamper may have been forewarned, but - coming from a long line of "shoprats" - he was seemingly unable to escape his fate. By the time he was a young man, his "life was so screwed up . . . that the idea of working for GM not only lost its repugnance, it took on the frantic allure of a rope tossed to a quicksand victim.
SPORTS
September 25, 1986 | By DICK WEISS, Daily News Sports Writer
Like so many other manufacturers, the quarterback factory has relocated in the Sun Belt. Brigham Young University, that stronghold in the Utah mountains, used to be the steadiest producer of premier passing quarterbacks. But now, the University of Miami, with headquarters in the upscale suburbia of South Florida, is the most productive supplier of arms. The latest to churn off Miami's assembly line is Vinny Testaverde. Almost any status-seeking NFL owner would be proud to have one. Testaverde, a 6-5, 215-pound senior, already has thrown for 724 yards and six touchdowns in the Hurricanes' first three games this season.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1992 | By Al Haas, INQUIRER AUTOMOTIVE WRITER
Chrysler Corp. said yesterday it would spend $137 million to modify its Newark, Del., assembly plant to produce an additional car, the hot, new Dodge Intrepid midsize sedan. The announcement allayed fears that the plant would close in 1994, when production will stop on the Chrysler, Plymouth and Dodge compacts assembled there. Production of the Intrepid is to start at the Newark plant next fall, Chrysler spokesman Lee Sechler said. The renovations making that possible will include a 50,000-square-foot addition and modifications to the existing assembly line to permit production of the Intrepid and the cars being built on it now. Those models are the Dodge Spirit and Plymouth Spirit sedans, as well as the Chrysler LeBaron sedan, coupe and convertible.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | By Sonya Senkowsky, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Just around the corner from Pureland Industrial Park, which boasts more than 100 companies and provides a base for employment in this town, one more industry briefly set up shop yesterday. There, in the technical education classroom of Logan Township Elementary School, a roomful of first graders reported to Cupcake Delight headquarters early yesterday morning, decked out in handmade paper chef's hats and ready to work. Yesterday's lesson, part of a pilot program designed to introduce technology into the elementary school curriculum, focused on the assembly line.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Once a month, the kitchen at Beth Sholom Congregation hums like a smooth-running factory. Cauldrons full of boiling pasta bubble softly, styrofoam trays are lined up neatly on the countertop, and men and women - wearing crisp white aprons and latex gloves - expertly maneuver around one another. At several Montgomery and Bucks County synagogues, the transformation from kitchen to assembly line is a regular occurrence. As part of a regional program called "Cook for A Friend," community organizations take turns preparing meals for the David G. Neuman Senior Center in Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 14, 1991 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
Think of an auto manufacturer who, in the interest of efficiency, decrees that a fixed amount of time be devoted to each unit: so much time for the chassis, so much for the sheet metal, so much for the engine. At the end of the process, the cars would be sorted and priced to reflect how well the workers at each station had done their jobs. The company might have to dump a lot of unmarketable automobiles, but the assembly line would keep rolling along. Sounds like a pretty stupid way to run an assembly line, doesn't it?
BUSINESS
April 10, 1990 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Automotive Writer
The metallic green Beretta had started down the line at the Chevrolet assembly plant in Wilmington, apparently destined to be a coupe. That is, after all, what the compact Beretta has always been. But someone at the plant decided that since this Beretta had only one life to live, it might as well live it as a sexy, blow-in-your-ear convertible. So the assembly-line robot did not weld a steel roof on this particular Beretta. Instead, the partially completed coupe was loaded on a truck and shipped across the river to a sprawling industrial building in the flat, agrarian hinterland of Bridgeport, Gloucester County.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis and Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was a crime so disturbing that the aircraft electrician who discovered it on a combat helicopter-assembly line at the Boeing Co. plant in Ridley Township last week almost threw up. A bundle of about 75 electrical wires controlling the instruments on a Boeing Chinook CH-47F - "the life and breath of the aircraft," in one union leader's words - had been slashed. Half the wires in the three-inch-thick cluster had been severed. Someone, it seemed, had hacked away at a $30 million aircraft that has been a workhorse for the military since the Vietnam War and a lifeline to the local labor force that produces it for the world's armed forces.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
What do you get when you serve Roadster Ricotta with Sports Car Sushi? The 2017 Fiat 124 Spider, a wedding of the original, Pininfarina-designed 124 Sport Spider, one of the loveliest Fiats ever, and the wonderfully playful Mazda Miata. Due in U.S. showrooms this summer, this latter-day evocation of that first Spider is a collaboration between Fiat and Mazda. The Japanese automaker supplies the Miata platform and some parts, and will build the rear-drive 124 Spider at its assembly plant in Hiroshima.
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NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Al Haas, Staff Writer
What do you get when you serve Roadster Ricotta with Sports Car Sushi? The 2017 Fiat 124 Spider, a wedding of the original, Pininfarina-designed 124 Sport Spider, one of the loveliest Fiats ever, and the wonderfully playful Mazda Miata. Due in U.S. showrooms this summer, this latter-day evocation of that first Spider is a collaboration between Fiat and Mazda. The Japanese automaker supplies the Miata platform and some parts, and will build the rear-drive 124 Spider at its assembly plant in Hiroshima.
NEWS
August 4, 2014
ISSUE | N.J. BAIL REFORM Plan tramples the rights of many Allowing nonviolent people ensnared in the criminal justice system who pose no risk to the community to be freed before trial without posting bail is an ingenious and revenue-saving policy that is long-overdue ("Wrong role for SCLC," July 30). However, stripping away the constitutional right to bail for 8.5 million New Jersey residents is too much of a compromise. The rhetoric surrounding the proposed constitutional amendment to remove the right to bail speaks of making communities safer.
NEWS
June 4, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
MOTOWN record-label founder Berry Gordy Jr. will receive this year's Marian Anderson Award, Mayor Nutter announced yesterday. Gordy, 83, helped launch the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder and many others through his Detroit-based label. The success of the "Motown Sound" - a crossover genre blending pop and soul - is seen as a major step in the racial integration of the music industry. "The Motown Sound that Mr. Gordy helped to mold united America at a time of great division," Nutter said.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
YOU KNOW a microbrewery has stepped it up a notch when it graduates from kegs to bottles and cans - and not just because the beer can be shipped to more drinkers in new destinations. It's one thing to fill up a half-barrel with 15.5 gallons of brew. It's a whole 'nother thing to spray exactly 12 ounces of those gushing suds into an assembly line of fragile glass and dentable aluminum containers. It takes a lot of cash, plenty of floor space, technical experience and unending patience to handle the touchy, highly calibrated packaging equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
EVAN MALONE had it good. His grandfather, Daniel Malone, an engineer for RCA/GE and later a maker of military systems and parts, had a workshop in his home "with all kinds of deadly stuff I tinkered with as a child. That's where I first caught the engineering bug. " Today, Evan Malone is doing unto others with NextFab Studio, a marvel of a shared workspace and prototyping station loaded with high-tech machinery, insights and enthusiasm. Now celebrating its second anniversary in a ground-floor space at the University City Science Center, NextFab has proven so popular it's about to expand into a second location on the west side of Washington Avenue "five times as big," shared Malone last week.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2011
In the Region Vist withdraws Treasury application Vist Financial Corp., a Wyomissing bank with branches in the Philadelphia area, said it withdrew its request to participate in the U.S. Treasury Department's Small Business Lending Fund after being told the application would not be approved. In its regulatory filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Vist said the Treasury Department did not give a specific reason for the rejection. - Harold Brubaker Montco casino access plan debated Officials of the $100 million-plus Valley Forge Casino planned for Upper Merion Township, Montgomery County, appeared before the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board on Wednesday to present a plan to monitor access to the new casino.
SPORTS
November 10, 2009
W HEN I'M KING of the world . . . The Phillies will give Pedro Feliz a little more respect than being tossed onto the market like a Cash-for-Clunkers auto . . . OK, I get it. General manager Ruben Amaro is probably making a shrewd business move by hoping there won't be a lot of clubs lining up to offer a big number - or even a low-medium number - to a 34-year-old player who just happened to play third base for a back-to-back National League...
BUSINESS
November 22, 2008 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Boeing Co. yesterday was forced to indefinitely suspend manufacturing on two lines of military aircraft at its Delaware County plant after the discovery earlier in the week of a plastic cap in the fuel line of a V-22 Osprey in production. "It is a very serious matter when you can't deliver on the commitments you have made to your customers," said Boeing spokesman John G. Williamson. "We take this very seriously. " The shutdown of work on the Osprey, a tilt-rotor craft, and on the CH-47 Chinook, a medium-lift cargo helicopter, at the Ridley Park facility was ordered in conjunction with a Corrective Action Request (CAR)
NEWS
May 21, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis and Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge yesterday ordered a $19-an-hour Boeing Co. assembly-line worker to undergo psychiatric testing after authorities arrested him and accused him of vandalizing a $30 million Chinook helicopter being built for the Army. Matthew Kevin Montgomery's appearance in U.S. District Court yesterday came as federal authorities announced that they had arrested the Trevose man and accused him of slashing wires on a nearly completed combat helicopter this month. The discovery of damage to two Chinooks shut down production last week on Boeing's Ridley Township line and prompted the U.S. Defense Department to launch a criminal probe into what caused irregularities during the final phase of production of the dual-rotor helicopters.
NEWS
May 18, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis and Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
It was a crime so disturbing that the aircraft electrician who discovered it on a combat helicopter-assembly line at the Boeing Co. plant in Ridley Township last week almost threw up. A bundle of about 75 electrical wires controlling the instruments on a Boeing Chinook CH-47F - "the life and breath of the aircraft," in one union leader's words - had been slashed. Half the wires in the three-inch-thick cluster had been severed. Someone, it seemed, had hacked away at a $30 million aircraft that has been a workhorse for the military since the Vietnam War and a lifeline to the local labor force that produces it for the world's armed forces.
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