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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eighty-year-old Trento Brizi wore a raincoat and no hat as he listened to the tributes from Mayor Goode, Italian and Israeli officials, religious leaders and others. The white-haired printer from Assisi was self-effacing. "He says that this is greater than what he deserves," an interpreter said yesterday as a group of Americans, Italians and Israelis stood at the base of the Holocaust Memorial at 16th Street and the Parkway while a light rain fell. Why did he risk his life when so many others did nothing to oppose the Nazis?
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - The focus of Pope Francis' papacy began to emerge Saturday as he offered some intimate insights into the conclave that elected him pontiff, describing how he was immediately inspired to name himself after St. Francis of Assisi because he wants to see a church that is "for the poor. " His comments provided further evidence that this first Latin American papacy would look beyond the confines of the church to the most disadvantaged. He took his name from a 13th-century friar who renounced a wealthy, dissolute lifestyle to embrace a life of poverty and simplicity and go out in the countryside to preach a message of joy and peace.
NEWS
October 5, 1995 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Officer Jardinelle Collins, of the Philadelphia Mounted Police, embraces her "partner" Eddie during a blessing of the animals ceremony attended by fellow mounted officers and K-9 unit police. The ceremony was held in honor of St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals.
NEWS
October 6, 1994 | For The Inquirer / JONATHAN WILSON
Christina Bledsoe holds her teddy bear as it is blessed by the Rev. Joseph F. Duffy. The pastor of St. Clare parish in Linfield went to Sacred Heart Elementary School in Royersford Tuesday to bless pets in honor of the feast day of St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | By Howard Goodman, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a little print shop, just off the main square in Assisi, Italy. For two years, the proprietors risked discovery by the Nazis. Discovery meant death. Still, they worked at the hand-fed press, secretly printing thousands of false identification papers that compatriots smuggled to Jews in hiding. Their bravery and ingenuity were crucial to an underground that saved at least 5,000 refugees from Nazi tyranny in 1944 and 1945, say historians of the period. Not once did the papers printed in Luigi Brizi's shop fail to stand up to official scrutiny.
NEWS
February 25, 1988 | By Edith McFall, Special to The Inquirer
An acting troupe from St. Andrew's parish in Drexel Hill has placed first in a Catholic Youth Organization one-act play competition at Archbishop Prendergast High School in Drexel Hill. The group performed Therapy, written by St. Andrew's parishioner Gus Matson and directed by Tim and Bernadette Farrell. The Farrells, who won the best-director award, said they had performed in CYO plays when they were in high school and had remained active as directors. Karen Whitaker, 16, a student at Merion-Mercer Academy, said Sunday's competition was the second production she had appeared in for St. Andrew's.
NEWS
May 24, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
If you didn't know better, Trento Brizi and Aldo Brunacci might look like a couple of retired paisanos sitting on a park bench waiting for hungry pigeons to totter by for a handout. They're not. Brizi goes to work every day in his small, one-man printing shop that's been in the family for more than 60 years. Brunacci's still working, too. In fact, his job's good for a lifetime. He's a priest. No, Trento Brizi, 74, and Father Aldo Brunacci, 75, are not ready to feed the pigeons.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN TAKING THE NAME Francis, the new pope hearkens back eight centuries to the preaching of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the most revered figures in the Catholic Church. St. Francis, born Giovanni di Bernardone, was something of a playboy in his youth and was a soldier before a vision sent him into a life of poverty and preaching. He was never a Catholic priest, but he founded the Franciscan Order and the Order of St. Clare for nuns. He was pronounced a saint by Pope Gregory IX on July 16, 1228.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Paintings often depict St. Francis of Assisi in harmony with nature, standing in a garden with birds perched upon his shoulders. The commonly held belief is that his serenity could tame chattering birds, even wild beasts. And to celebrate his feast day Oct. 4, many Catholic churches invite the community to take in their pets to receive a blessing. But according to Sister Clare Immaculate McDonnell of Neumann College, St. Francis deserves recognition for his humanism, mysticism and his aesthetic sensibility.
TRAVEL
June 23, 2014 | By D.A. Gleason, For The Inquirer
When I heard that Popes John Paul II and John XXIII would be canonized, I knew I'd be Rome-bound. I traveled to the Eternal City for John Paul's funeral in 2005 and his beatification in 2011, sleeping on the cobblestones to ensure entrance to St. Peter's Square. It worked. This time I decided to travel with an organized group - understanding that I'd be on my own for the canonization, a non-ticketed event. Our group of 40 included a teacher, a musician, an ex-nun, a Korean couple married 50 years, and three priests: Father Matt, a high-energy West Point grad; Father Mike, blind since age 6; and Father Jose, a young Colombian priest serving in Jersey City, N.J. Ordinary people like myself embarking on an extraordinary journey.
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TRAVEL
June 23, 2014 | By D.A. Gleason, For The Inquirer
When I heard that Popes John Paul II and John XXIII would be canonized, I knew I'd be Rome-bound. I traveled to the Eternal City for John Paul's funeral in 2005 and his beatification in 2011, sleeping on the cobblestones to ensure entrance to St. Peter's Square. It worked. This time I decided to travel with an organized group - understanding that I'd be on my own for the canonization, a non-ticketed event. Our group of 40 included a teacher, a musician, an ex-nun, a Korean couple married 50 years, and three priests: Father Matt, a high-energy West Point grad; Father Mike, blind since age 6; and Father Jose, a young Colombian priest serving in Jersey City, N.J. Ordinary people like myself embarking on an extraordinary journey.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - The focus of Pope Francis' papacy began to emerge Saturday as he offered some intimate insights into the conclave that elected him pontiff, describing how he was immediately inspired to name himself after St. Francis of Assisi because he wants to see a church that is "for the poor. " His comments provided further evidence that this first Latin American papacy would look beyond the confines of the church to the most disadvantaged. He took his name from a 13th-century friar who renounced a wealthy, dissolute lifestyle to embrace a life of poverty and simplicity and go out in the countryside to preach a message of joy and peace.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Orlando R. Barone
Just after Jorge Mario Bergoglio became Pope Francis, I received a text from my son: "I guess I took the right Confirmation name. " Last year, at age 33, Nick was confirmed in the Catholic faith, and he adopted the name of Francis in honor of Francis of Assisi. I remember asking him why. "The guy was crazy, Dad. " Not an auspicious start, but I listened on. "You know, he was from a pretty well-to-do family. He rejected everything, wouldn't even wear shoes. " "You're not thinking of going shoeless.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN TAKING THE NAME Francis, the new pope hearkens back eight centuries to the preaching of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the most revered figures in the Catholic Church. St. Francis, born Giovanni di Bernardone, was something of a playboy in his youth and was a soldier before a vision sent him into a life of poverty and preaching. He was never a Catholic priest, but he founded the Franciscan Order and the Order of St. Clare for nuns. He was pronounced a saint by Pope Gregory IX on July 16, 1228.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
By Xavier Suarez I may be the only lay person to have roomed an entire summer with Cardinal Sean O'Malley. For sure, I am the only politician to have lived under one (rather small) roof with the Capuchin friar. It was in the early 1970s, and the location was a little, sparsely furnished apartment in an area of Washington, D.C., that was populated by the working poor and illegal immigrants. Some of the latter survived from the wages paid to their daughters and wives by diplomats who could risk violating U.S. minimum-wage laws because they could invoke diplomatic immunity.
NEWS
February 7, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing declining enrollments and unacceptable financial burdens on the parishes supporting them, Camden Bishop Joseph A. Galante announced yesterday that he was closing six parish schools at the end of the school year. Galante told a news conference the closings were "painful" but necessary for "laying the foundation for the long-term stability" of Catholic schools in the diocese. St. Patrick School in Woodbury and St. Matthew School in National Park are among the six affected.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | By Ida Hatter FOR THE INQUIRER
Having been raised Roman Catholic, I was more than familiar with the saints and their miracles. So, when my husband, Mike, and I and our two best friends, Frank and Barbara, went to Tuscany in 1995, we decided one day to visit Assisi. St. Francis' feast day was the next day. Preparations and a parade in honor of him were already going on. Fluttering along in their long, brown robes, Franciscan monks all had somewhere to go and something to do. When we drove into Assisi, we parked at the lower church.
NEWS
July 6, 1999 | By Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Catholic schools have rules about this sort of thing, and St. Francis of Assisi is no exception. Hair must be short and well-groomed, and cuts that look punk, spiked or bald are not acceptable. When 11-year-old Joey Tobolski showed up at the end of the year shorn to the scalp in the webbed pattern of a soccer ball, his teacher pointed him to the office. The principal decided to go easy on Joey once she found out who was behind the haircut, which turned heads in his fifth-grade class and on soccer fields throughout the region.
NEWS
February 8, 1999 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hugh P. McKenna, 85, a former Democratic ward leader and one-time sergeant-at-arms at City Council, died of cancer Friday at his home near Sonestown, Pa. Mr. McKenna was born in Kensington. He left school in the eighth grade to help support his family, but he became well-schooled in politics. At first, he held a series of jobs delivering ice and coal. He was small enough to crawl through the basement windows through which the coal was delivered. Once he received his driver's license, he went to work as a truck driver for Highway Express Lines, owned by then-Democratic City Chairman James P. Clark.
NEWS
June 13, 1998 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Msgr. Joseph P. Cooney, 81, pastor emeritus of St. Katharine of Siena Church in Wayne, died Wednesday at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital after a lengthy illness. He lived at St. Joseph Villa in Darby. Msgr. Cooney had served as pastor of St. Katharine of Siena Church for 22 years, from 1970 until his retirement in 1992, when he was named pastor emeritus. "He cared very much for the children and for the Catholic education program," said Msgr. John J. Jagodzinski, pastor at St. Katharine of Siena.
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