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Associate Degree

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NEWS
May 15, 2010 | By Haley Marks, Inquirer Staff Writer
After five deployments and 20 years of military service, Army Sgt. First Class Marcel Pruner will realize a lifelong dream Saturday: earning a college degree. Pruner, who has served in Central America and Iraq, will earn his associate degree in criminal justice during Burlington County College's commencement for 1,011 students in Pemberton. Pruner, 38, an instructor at Fort Dix, began his military career directly out of high school at age 17. He started college in 1991. "Somewhere along the line I didn't feel like I could continue," he said.
NEWS
May 11, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Santoro, 60, of Mount Laurel, owner and operator of seven McDonald's restaurants in South Jersey and Southeastern Pennsylvania, died Saturday, May 7, at Resorts Hotel in Atlantic City. Determination of the cause of death is pending an autopsy. Mr. Santoro and his wife, Terri Breuer Santoro, spent the occasional weekend in Atlantic City, where he enjoyed going to shows and playing card games and video poker at the casinos. The owner of four McDonald's restaurants in Burlington County and three in Delaware County, Mr. Santoro began sweeping floors and taking orders at a McDonald's when he was 15. After graduating from Camden Catholic High School in Cherry Hill, he continued to work at McDonald's, flipping burgers and cooking fries, while earning an associate degree from Camden County College.
SPORTS
October 28, 1995 | By Jeremy Treatman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Keon Clark, who twice attempted to join Temple's basketball program, finally is on the verge of playing in Division I. However, it appears the 6-foot-11 center will play for UNLV and not the Owls. Clark is currently in his first year at Dixie Junior College in Utah, where he is not playing basketball. He has given an oral commitment to attend UNLV next semester, according to Dixie coach David Rose. Rose said Clark will have 2 1/2 years of eligibility at UNLV if he earns his associate degree from Dixie by December.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Burlington County College will offer several new programs this fall. The rapid-study business degree, which will cover 10 semesters, offers flexible course lengths, course scheduling options, peer support groups and the opportunity to earn a Burlington County College associate degree followed by a bachelor's degree from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Fairleigh Dickinson courses will be offered at the county college's Mount Laurel and Pemberton campuses. For information, call 609-894-9311, Ext. 7617.
NEWS
March 31, 1999
Making it easier for Pennsylvania's community college students to earn four-year degrees at state-funded universities is a winning idea. Students can save both time and money on their way to a valuable credential. Colleges can save money and boost enrollment. And the commonwealth gains better trained workers. The publicly funded colleges should help make smoother transfers a reality. In January, the State System of Higher Education adopted an "academic passport" that will grant admission to its 14 universities for any student with an associate degree from one of Pennsylvania's 15 community colleges.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Beginning in January, students in the lower part of Bucks County won't have to head north to earn a college degree. Bucks County Community College will start offering associate degrees in liberal arts and business administration at its satellite campus in Bristol Township, said David J. Johnson, associate dean for evening and off-campus programs. The Bristol campus now offers mostly introductory courses. In order to take the more advanced courses required for an associate degree, students must commute to the main campus on Swamp Road in Newtown Township.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
Amid beach balls bouncing, bubble blowing and C-141 cargo planes flying overhead, 261 students at Burlington County College graduated during the school's 21st commencement exercises last Friday. It was a celebration, especially for Les and Jo Bohony. The Mount Holly couple, who were also celebrating their fifth wedding anniversary, opted to spend the greater part of their day with their classmates. Even though they both have earned other degrees - Les an associate's and a bachelor's degree from Thomas A. Edison College in Princeton, and Jo a nursing degree from Burlington County College - neither had ever worn a cap and gown or participated in college graduation ceremonies before.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
Josephine Carlucci had two reasons to be proud during the Camden County College graduation ceremony. First, she was able to watch her son, Pat, 23, step up to the podium to receive an associate of arts degree in speech and theater. Then it was her turn. Josephine was the next graduate to walk to the front of the crowd, where she was given an associate degree in business administration. "I'm very proud," said Carlucci, who lives in Medford and spent 10 years studying part-time to earn her diploma.
NEWS
May 21, 1995 | By Matt White, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Artie DeSoto tells his children that by the time they want jobs, they'll need a master's degree to be competitive. DeSoto himself is working toward an associate degree at Gloucester County College, and, as a technician at Kennedy Hospital's Stratford Division, he knows there aren't many ways up for him without even a bachelor's degree. "It seems like they always want some kind of management and development training as you move up," said DeSoto, 41. "To advance your career, you need those skills.
NEWS
August 8, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Community College of Philadelphia and Mayor Nutter yesterday announced a plan to pick up the tab for tuition, fees, and some of the cost of textbooks for Philadelphia residents who have completed 30 or more credit hours toward an associate degree and who have been out of school for at least two years. Starting this fall, the pilot plan will be funded by a $100,000 donation from an anonymous person, officials announced yesterday at a news conference at the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce headquarters in Center City.
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NEWS
July 14, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
PRESIDENT Obama's education secretary said Philadelphia schools are "starved for resources" and strongly urged state lawmakers to step up investment in education during a visit to the city yesterday. Arne Duncan's comments followed a roundtable discussion at Community College of Philadelphia with Mayor Nutter and a dozen young men of color about their challenges in education. "The children of Philly deserve better than what they have. The lack of funding, the lack of commitment at the state level is simply unacceptable," Duncan said.
NEWS
May 2, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
SO, there you are, a first-time Atlantic City visitor, on the Boardwalk. You're standing in front of The Pier Shops at Caesars and you decide you want to check out the Land Shark Bar & Grill on the Resorts Casino-Hotel beach. But being unfamiliar with the lay of the land, you don't know whether to go right or left to reach your destination. You could always guess, and hope you've made the right decision. Or you could reach out to an easy-to-spot Boardwalk Ambassador and ask for directions.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE FAMILY of Claudette Denise Willie waxed poetic in describing her: "If life was a song, she sang it. If life was a challenge, she met it. If life was a dream, she realized it. If life was a sacrifice, she offered it. "She was a connoisseur of life," her family concluded. Claudette Denise Willie, affectionately called "Brown Eyes," a registered nurse known for devotion to the well-being of her patients, died Oct. 25 of cancer at age 58. The residents of the Silver Stream Center in Spring House, Montgomery County, were fortunate to have had Claudette as their director of nursing in long-term care.
NEWS
October 4, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
BLUE BELL Montgomery County Community College has forged its first international partnership, with a university in South Korea, making it easier for students to transfer there for a bachelor's degree. The "articulation agreement" between the college and Dongseo University in Busan may seem surprising, given a community college's traditionally local mission. College president Karen A. Stout said the partnership grew out of community interest and is part of a growing effort to expand the college's reach and global awareness.
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
BERNICE APPEL, of Northeast Philadelphia, was already well into her 70s when she told her two grown daughters, "Come hell or high water, I'm going to get my college degree before I'm 80. " Today, less than six months shy of her 80th birthday - "Oct. 30, mischief night!" she said, laughing - the graduating granny dons cap and gown, and proudly gets her associate degree in general studies from Community College of Philadelphia. As Sir Paul McCartney would put it, if he were the commencement singer, it's been a long and winding road.
NEWS
March 13, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Emanuel "Manny" Ortiz, 63, a longtime advocate and political organizer in Philadelphia's Puerto Rican community, died Friday, March 8, at Pennsylvania Hospital of complications following heart surgery. For two decades, Mr. Ortiz served as executive director of the Hispanic educational organization ASPIRA Inc. of Pennsylvania. He also was a founder of Taller Puertorriqueño, a group for activists and artists. He served as deputy mayor under Mayor Ed Rendell. He was a key supporter for former City Councilman Angel Ortiz and the coalition that elected Mayor W. Wilson Goode.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Facing the future with a college degree is like being in a lifeboat on a roiling sea. Facing the future with a high school degree is like being in the water. If you're a member of the millennial generation - ages 18 to 34 - who never got beyond 12th grade, expect hard times, say people who study the transition from youth to adulthood. "There's nothing for these kids," said Maria Kefalas, a St. Joseph's University sociologist. "Absolutely nothing. " Anthony Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, put it this way: "It's remarkable how much trouble they're in. " It's not simply the recession and its robust half-life that stymie high-school-only young people.
NEWS
September 27, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
CARMELLA Renee Steele wasn't about to let a debilitating disease keep her from having a productive life. In fact, Carmella encouraged and inspired others with handicaps to overcome their disabilities and to live full lives. Carmella Steele, a victim of the painful autoimmune disorder lupus, a mother of three children, an active churchwoman and a role model for the many people she touched, died Sept. 18 at age 46. "Carmella had a heart of gold," her family said. "For many years, she was found encouraging and uplifting others through the word of God. She loved the Lord and she loved people.
NEWS
July 10, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
SOMETIMES a preacher is faced with the challenge of helping people cope with unspeakable tragedy.   Rev. Gregory E. Boykin faced such a challenge when he gave the eulogy at the funeral of a beloved 6-year-old girl who was among four people, including two other children, killed by a car being chased by police in Feltonville in June 2009. The car rammed into a group of people on the sidewalk on 3rd Street near Annsbury. Boykin, who had just returned from North Carolina, where he had buried his mother, tried in his sermon at Deliverance Evangelistic Church in North Philadelphia to encourage the mourners to believe that little Aaliyah Griffin was in heaven.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael J. Dougherty, 83, who retired in 1983 as senior vice president of the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. after a 23-year career there, died of respiratory complications Wednesday, May 9, in Naples, (Fla.) Community Hospital. He had moved to Naples from Havertown in 1993. Born in West Philadelphia, Mr. Dougherty graduated from West Catholic High School in 1948 and attended Temple University before serving as an Army engineer in 1951-52. "We always talked about how he made it to VP without a full four-year degree," son Charles said, though Mr. Dougherty did earn an associate degree in business at Temple.
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