CollectionsAsthma
IN THE NEWS

Asthma

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SOMERVILLE, N.J. - Gov. Chris Christie was "in charge and at work" in a hospital room yesterday following emergency treatment for asthma, his deputy chief of staff said. The blunt-talking governor, who some Republicans have been trying to persuade to run for president, was taken to the Somerset Medical Center yesterday morning after he had difficulty breathing. Christie, who uses an inhaler for asthma and is overweight, was headed to a bill-signing when he felt ill. He was driven to the hospital by his State Police security detail out of an "abundance of caution," gubernatorial spokesman Michael Drewniak said.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 750 Philadelphia-area children who came to have their height, weight, and blood pressure taken Saturday morning were treated to much more entertainment than a routine visit to a doctor's office might include - face paint, basketball drills, a game show, and a surprise appearance by Will Smith. Smith drew cheers from the children who crowded around him at the Healthy Hoops event by reciting a line of the theme song of his 1990s television show The Fresh Prince of Bel Air - "In West Philadelphia born and raised.
SPORTS
August 2, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Dallas Cowboys running back Ennis Haywood died accidentally from a mixture of drugs and ethanol complicated by his asthma, the Tarrant County, Texas, medical examiner's office has ruled. "Although the mixed ethanol and drug ingestion was the primary cause of death, a significant condition contributing to the death was bronchial asthma," the office said in a statement issued yesterday. Haywood, 23, died during May minicamp at Medical Center of Arlington, where he was taken after he began vomiting in his sleep.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | By Steve Wartenberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was better late than never for Malvern Prep's Dave Hisler on Saturday at an indoor track meet at St. Joseph's University. Hisler was slated to run the third leg of the Friars' mile relay, but he got lost trying to find St. Joe's. "My mom gave me the wrong directions," Hisler said. "I wound up at the other end of City Avenue. " Hisler finally got to the meet at 10 o'clock in the morning. Normally, that wouldn't have been a problem, but the Division II meet was running an hour ahead of schedule.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN AIR Study did not prove fracking caused asthma As an environmental professional, I am disappointed in a letter and coverage of a study that promote scary headlines far from the reality of safe gas development in Pennsylvania (" Air quality at risk ," July 22). The study's authors said they "did not prove any link" but found an association between gas development and asthma. The authors did not establish a baseline of cases prior to shale development or consider asthma trends in the commonwealth.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / HELENA I. SHELDON
Summer camp is a common experience for most youngsters, but for those with asthma, camp is not an everyday affair. With the help of the American Lung Association and the Children's Country Week Assocation, 50 children had the chance last week to attend Camp Superstuff for the first time. The youngsters - from Chester, Bucks, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties - spent five days at Paradise Farm Camp in Downingtown.
NEWS
September 16, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Herbert Charles Mansmann Jr., 83, of Royersford and Rangeley, Maine, a pioneering pediatric allergist, died of pneumonia Sept. 4 at Franklin Memorial Hospital in Farmington, Maine. In 1968, Dr. Mansmann established the division of allergy and immunology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. He directed the division until 1989, and was professor of pediatrics at Jefferson from 1968 to 2003. He instituted the Allergy/Immunology Fellowship Program at Jefferson, researched the benefits of magnesium in the treatment of asthma and other diseases, and was one of the first physicians to report the lifesaving potential of ventilators during short, acute asthma attacks.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Asthma rates among U.S. children have quieted down after a decades-long increase, a government study found, and researchers are trying to pinpoint reasons that would explain the trend. A possible plateau in childhood obesity rates and declines in air pollution are among factors that may have helped lower cases in kids, the 2001-13 study suggests. Overall, average asthma rates among those ages 17 and younger increased slightly, then leveled off and declined by the study's end, when 8.3 percent of children were affected.
SPORTS
January 13, 1999 | By Joe Santoliquito, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
His lungs sometimes sting as if someone had set a three-alarm blaze in his insides. The burn can be so great that his back turns red. When he gets out of the pool, his breathing is so labored that he has to struggle for air. It feels, Sean Tucker says, as if someone had cut his lungs in half. The La Salle High senior standout constantly battles an acute case of asthma, but he has not let it deter him from succeeding. Tucker is the reigning Catholic League champion in the 100-yard breaststroke, and he finished second in the 50 freestyle last year.
SPORTS
September 15, 1999 | By C. Kalimah Redd, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
No one could have anticipated the problems lurking inside 8-year-old Linda Hooks when she anxiously watched her father playing on a tennis court nearly 10 years ago. Until then, Hooks had been a lover of dance: tap, jazz and ballet. But after she watched her father smack a tennis ball across the court, the sport seemed too much fun for her to resist. "I saw them out there, and I decided that I want to try this," she said. For the next two years, Hooks took private lessons, played in tournaments, and practiced with her father, Stewart, and a family friend.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 2, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN AIR Study did not prove fracking caused asthma As an environmental professional, I am disappointed in a letter and coverage of a study that promote scary headlines far from the reality of safe gas development in Pennsylvania (" Air quality at risk ," July 22). The study's authors said they "did not prove any link" but found an association between gas development and asthma. The authors did not establish a baseline of cases prior to shale development or consider asthma trends in the commonwealth.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
ISSUE | FRACKING Air quality at risk A study showing that fracking may be worsening asthma for those who live near such oil- and gas-drilling operations should not come as a surprise ("Fracking may worsen asthma for nearby residents, study says," Philly.com, Monday). We already know that oil and gas infrastructure leaks smog-forming compounds and toxic pollutants into our air at an alarming rate, and the findings published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine are only the latest in a string of research conducted in Pennsylvania showing correlations between fracking and health issues.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | AIR POLLUTION Ozone endangers children with asthma Ground-level ozone is a powerful pollutant that can trigger dangerous health consequences, including asthma attacks and heart attacks ("Linking environmental, public health," May 15). Doctors see patients' physical distress when ozone levels are high. My particular concern is the effect of air pollution on uniquely vulnerable members of our population: children with asthma. The health community can play a critical role in educating decision-makers about the need for clean-air safeguards to protect public health.
NEWS
March 9, 2016 | By Alfred Lubrano, Staff Writer
Veterinarian Dominic Dallago pets his patient, a domestic short-haired cat with diarrhea, as though she can't harm him. But lurking in the dense black fur of the purring 10-year-old feline (Dallago won't name her for privacy reasons) are allergens that don't pussyfoot around - microscopic proteins poised to attack like throat-choking commandos, to lay the allergic doctor low by triggering his asthma. "I usually sniffle, snort," said Dallago, 37, who works at World of Animals Veterinary Hospital in the Rittenhouse Square area.
NEWS
January 3, 2016
Asthma rates among U.S. children have quieted down after a decades-long increase, a government study found, and researchers are trying to pinpoint reasons that would explain the trend. A possible plateau in childhood obesity rates and declines in air pollution are among factors that may have helped lower cases in kids, the 2001-13 study suggests. Overall, average asthma rates among those ages 17 and younger increased slightly, then leveled off and declined by the study's end, when 8.3 percent of children were affected.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since suffering a near-fatal asthma attack in the summer of 2014, 51-year-old Peter Bowser has been hospitalized 20 times. Doctors believe Bowser's asthma was exacerbated by his living conditions: a resident of a Camden homeless shelter, he left the facility each morning and walked several miles to a library, where he could stay indoors to get relief from hot or cold weather. Last month, Bowser became one of the first people to be placed in an apartment through Camden County's new "Housing First" program, aimed at reducing chronic homelessness and expensive emergency room visits.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
What the heck is a Health Hack? Instead of the traditional hackathon with computer geeks, pizza and Red Bull, think medical professionals, engineers, artists, tech types and an insurance company, banding together to come up with creative solutions to improve delivery of health care, then toss in some yoga, zumba and kickboxing and add a vegetarian lunch. That was the scene at Jefferson University Hospital this weekend as about 250 participants in the first Independence/Jefferson Health Hack came together to brainstorm solutions to 60 health care challenges centered around reducing hospital admissions, wearables devices and drone-based health care delivery.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For nearly two decades, Tyra Bryant-Stephens has worked to lessen the asthma crisis among children in Philadelphia neighborhoods where rates of the potentially deadly condition far outstrip the national average. In 1997, the physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia founded the Community Asthma Prevention Program, which she has led ever since. The staff of 12 includes nurses, educators, and lay home visitors. Bryant-Stephens also is active with the American Lung Association.
NEWS
September 5, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
The estate of a 12-year-old girl who died after suffering an asthma attack at a West Philadelphia elementary school - that at the time did not have a nurse on duty - has lodged a wrongful-death suit against the School District. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court, seeks damages in the Sept. 25, 2013, death of Laporshia Massey. Also named as defendants were the school, its principal, and Laporshia's teacher. According to the suit, Laporshia was attending classes at Bryant Elementary School, at 6001 Cedar Ave., when she began having difficulty breathing.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
THE DEATH of any child is a tragedy. The death of two children who fell ill while at school is unspeakable. And while the cause of death for a first-grader at Andrew Jackson School has not been determined, both cases demand that we take a hard look at the impact the district's budget realities may be having on children. When the Jackson student died Wednesday, there was no school nurse on duty. Nor was there a school nurse on duty in October when a sixth-grader had an asthma attack and subsequently died.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|