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Asthma Attacks

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NEWS
April 29, 1993 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women are much more likely to suffer an asthma attack around the start of their menstrual period, a study led by Philadelphia researchers has found. The asthma attacks coincide with the time of the month when a woman's estrogen levels are falling, according to Emil Skobeloff, an emergency room doctor at the Medical College of Pennsylvania (MCP), who directed the study. "We found that during the time of the menstrual cycle when estrogen is high . . . very few women, if any, come into the emergency department for asthma," he said.
NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | AIR POLLUTION Ozone endangers children with asthma Ground-level ozone is a powerful pollutant that can trigger dangerous health consequences, including asthma attacks and heart attacks ("Linking environmental, public health," May 15). Doctors see patients' physical distress when ozone levels are high. My particular concern is the effect of air pollution on uniquely vulnerable members of our population: children with asthma. The health community can play a critical role in educating decision-makers about the need for clean-air safeguards to protect public health.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | By Modena Wilson and Alain Joffe, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
A mother wrote that her daughter is in very good physical shape, but whenever she plays sports for any length of time, she seems to get winded and has to sit down to catch her breath. She wondered if the girl should stop playing. We replied that the girl may be experiencing exercise-induced asthma, a fairly common condition among children and teenagers. Research suggests the rapid breathing associated with exercise dries the lung passages, leading to a spasm of the airways.
NEWS
September 8, 2003 | By John H. Adler
President Bush is trying to make us sick. What other conclusion can we reach regarding the Environmental Protection Agency's relaxation last month of the clean-air rule known as "new source review"? The revision makes it easier, and cheaper, for hundreds of old coal-fired power plants to upgrade without first installing previously required equipment to limit pollution. Midwestern power plants lobbied long and hard for the exemption from antipollution requirements, which they regard as detrimental to their bottom line.
LIVING
September 9, 1996 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Women can add asthma attacks to the growing list of mysterious ways their bodies respond to estrogen. A study led by Philadelphia researchers has found that women are most likely to suffer severe asthma attacks during the week around the start of their menstrual period, when estrogen declines sharply in their blood. The study, which followed 182 women for a year, appears in today's issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. It builds on the researchers' previous findings that women are three times as likely as men to be hospitalized for treatment of asthma, a disease that afflicts an estimated 10 million Americans.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For nearly two decades, Tyra Bryant-Stephens has worked to lessen the asthma crisis among children in Philadelphia neighborhoods where rates of the potentially deadly condition far outstrip the national average. In 1997, the physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia founded the Community Asthma Prevention Program, which she has led ever since. The staff of 12 includes nurses, educators, and lay home visitors. Bryant-Stephens also is active with the American Lung Association.
NEWS
May 13, 1997 | BY DAVID MASUR and JOEL CHINITZ
A powerful alliance of oil and chemical companies, auto manufacturers and power-plant owners has launched an assault on health standards required by the Clean Air Act. Doctors and scientists are concerned about smog and particulate matter because of the steady increase in the number of Americans suffering from asthma. Once you have asthma, air pollution - especially smog and particulate matter - can trigger symptoms that could send you to your inhaler, your doctor, the emergency room - or could be fatal.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | By Marc Schogol, with reports from Inquirer wire services
FITNESS IN THE 40S Sad but true - your fortysomething body may have the will to go out and exercise, but it may not be ready. The American Physical Therapy Association is teaming up with Texas Ranger ace Nolan Ryan to pitch the merits of exercise conditioning and moderation to people over 40 with a campaign of dos and don'ts. For a free copy of the brochure "Fitness: A Way of Life," send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to Fitness: APTA, Box 37257, Washington, D.C. 20013. MEASURING UP Speaking of fitness, a new device lets you gauge your body fat in the privacy of your own home.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of a West Philadelphia sixth grader last month from asthma complications continued to spark outrage Friday even as the Philadelphia School District clarified actions staff at Bryant Elementary School took the day the girl became ill. Much of the anger stems from the lack of a nurse on duty on Sept. 25 who could have recognized Laporcha Massey's distress. Bryant has a nurse only two days a week. District spokesman Fernando Gallard said Friday that after Laporcha reported feeling ill, the school twice called her home to ask someone to pick her up. When no one came by dismissal time, around 2:45 p.m., an aide felt sorry for the 12-year-old and drove her home.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Matt Katz, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
SOMERVILLE - Gov. Christie was hospitalized for eight hours Thursday after suffering an asthma attack on the way to a bill-signing and news conference. Christie, 48, who said he felt better, but tired, after being released from Somerset Medical Center in central New Jersey, never lost consciousness and planned to resume work Friday. "I was a little bit scared, but I was never passed out, incapacitated," Christie said in a 28-minute news conference outside the hospital. Christie, who regularly speaks about using an inhaler daily, said it was the first time he had been hospitalized for his asthma since law school.
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NEWS
June 1, 2016
ISSUE | AIR POLLUTION Ozone endangers children with asthma Ground-level ozone is a powerful pollutant that can trigger dangerous health consequences, including asthma attacks and heart attacks ("Linking environmental, public health," May 15). Doctors see patients' physical distress when ozone levels are high. My particular concern is the effect of air pollution on uniquely vulnerable members of our population: children with asthma. The health community can play a critical role in educating decision-makers about the need for clean-air safeguards to protect public health.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
For nearly two decades, Tyra Bryant-Stephens has worked to lessen the asthma crisis among children in Philadelphia neighborhoods where rates of the potentially deadly condition far outstrip the national average. In 1997, the physician at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia founded the Community Asthma Prevention Program, which she has led ever since. The staff of 12 includes nurses, educators, and lay home visitors. Bryant-Stephens also is active with the American Lung Association.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THEY BROUGHT her baby wipes. With her cheek flayed open, nose crushed and eyes swelling shut, Micheal Allen needed a Band-Aid, gauze, antiseptic - something - to stop the flow of blood until she could get to the hospital. Instead, a staffer at the Kintock Center, a North Philadelphia halfway house where resident Allen had been attacked by another resident, brought her baby wipes when she couldn't get into the nurse's locked office after the assault last May. Later, when her cheek swelled into a "big blood-filled pocket," Allen said, it took a week before she could persuade a staffer to bring her back to the hospital for care.
NEWS
October 16, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
OUTRAGE IS continuing to grow in the wake of a disturbing report about a 12-year-old student who died from asthma complications on the day her West Philly school didn't have a nurse on staff. The Pennsylvania chapter of National Action Network yesterday called on the School District of Philadelphia and the state Department of Health to investigate the circumstances around the Sept. 25 death of Laporshia Massey, a sixth-grader at Bryant Elementary School. "In West and North Philly, more than 30 percent of children between the ages of 5 and 12 have been diagnosed with asthma," Matthew Smith Sr., the chapter's president, said in a statement.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of a West Philadelphia sixth grader last month from asthma complications continued to spark outrage Friday even as the Philadelphia School District clarified actions staff at Bryant Elementary School took the day the girl became ill. Much of the anger stems from the lack of a nurse on duty on Sept. 25 who could have recognized Laporcha Massey's distress. Bryant has a nurse only two days a week. District spokesman Fernando Gallard said Friday that after Laporcha reported feeling ill, the school twice called her home to ask someone to pick her up. When no one came by dismissal time, around 2:45 p.m., an aide felt sorry for the 12-year-old and drove her home.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Don Sapatkin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since August, the Corbett administration has cut off more than 150,000 people - including 43,000 children - from medical assistance in a drive to save costs. That purge far exceeds what any other state has tried, health policy experts say, and officials may be walking a fine line between rooting out waste and erecting barriers to care for the poor and disabled. When most states were experiencing flat or rising Medicaid enrollment from the economic downturn, stepped-up eligibility reviews in Pennsylvania began producing a decline over the summer.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
SOMERVILLE, N.J. - Gov. Christie was hospitalized for eight hours Thursday after an asthma attack on the way to a bill-signing and news conference. Christie, 48, who said he felt better, but tired, after being released from Somerset Medical Center in central New Jersey, never lost consciousness and planned to resume work Friday. "I was a little bit scared, but I was never passed out, incapacitated," Christie said in a 28-minute news conference outside the hospital. Christie, who regularly speaks about using an inhaler daily, said it was the first time he had been hospitalized for asthma since law school.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Matt Katz, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
SOMERVILLE - Gov. Christie was hospitalized for eight hours Thursday after suffering an asthma attack on the way to a bill-signing and news conference. Christie, 48, who said he felt better, but tired, after being released from Somerset Medical Center in central New Jersey, never lost consciousness and planned to resume work Friday. "I was a little bit scared, but I was never passed out, incapacitated," Christie said in a 28-minute news conference outside the hospital. Christie, who regularly speaks about using an inhaler daily, said it was the first time he had been hospitalized for his asthma since law school.
SPORTS
November 20, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Mike Tyson could have received more than 4 years in prison. He left the courtroom having to serve all of 1 day in an open-air jail. The former heavyweight champion was sentenced yesterday in Mesa, Ariz., for cocaine possession and driving under the influence. "I take responsibility for my actions," Tyson told the judge. He left the courthouse flanked by supporters, lit a cigar and rode away in the back of a black Mercedes. The 41-year-old boxer will serve his day in jail today for DUI. He received 3 years of probation for the cocaine charge and also will have to pay a fine, submit to drug testing and serve 360 hours of community service.
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