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Astronomy

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NEWS
July 25, 2002 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
"Heavens Declare!", a special program featuring astronomy writer James Mullaney, will be held at 7:30 tonight at Calvary Lutheran Church, 730 S. New St., West Chester. Mullaney, a self-described celestial evangelist, will present a slide-illustrated lecture about topics that link religion and astronomical studies. He will discuss subjects ranging from scientific theories of creation to references to stars in the Bible. The program is free and will be followed by a reception, with a telescope set up to view the night sky. For more information, call 610-696-2475.
NEWS
October 3, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
As much as two-thirds of the world's population can no longer look up at the night sky and see the Milky Way, a band of white light from millions of stars in our galaxy, according to a NASA report. Light pollution, artificial outdoor lighting that washes out natural star light, has stolen from many residents of the five-county Philadelphia region what their ancestors took for granted - a backyard view of a clear night sky filled with stars. This month, from Oct. 15 to 17, more than 100 amateur astronomers will travel from as far as Canada and Virginia to gather at a local dark spot, Camp Onas near Ottsville in northern Bucks County, for Stella Della Valley XVIII, one of the oldest star parties in the Mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CAROL AMBRUSTER didn't hesitate to speak her mind when she saw injustice. Like the time the Philadelphia Orchestra raised its single-ticket concert price to make it the most expensive in the nation. Carol hit the ceiling. "Oh, my heavens, it's really a slap in the face," she told an Inquirer interviewer in 2002. "It's the arrogance of the rich toward those of us who love music. " Carol M. Ambruster, a retired assistant astronomy and astrophysics professor at Villanova University, was stabbed to death Dec. 9 in her Germantown apartment at Wayne Avenue and School House Lane.
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jason A. Cardelli, 40, of Media, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Villanova, died of a heart attack Tuesday following a faculty picnic at the university. He was pronounced dead at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Mr. Cardelli, who joined the faculty in January 1995, taught fundamentals of astrophyics, as well as astronomy courses and laboratories. He was a leading researcher into the makeup of interstellar matter - the dust and gas between stars in our own and neighboring galaxies - looking for clues about the formation of stars and the structure of the galaxy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
The Chesmont Astronomical Society will present StarFest 2008 beginning at 4 p.m. Saturday at Warwick County Park in Pottstown. This educational event will feature guest speakers, children's activities, and astronomy presentations. Telescopes will be set up for solar observing from 4 to 6 p.m. Then, at 6 p.m., Kids Corner educational activities will begin, including a constellation scavenger hunt and crafts. Presentations are scheduled for 7 to 8:30 p.m., including "How to Get Your Picture in the NY Times," "What You'll See Tonight" by Martin Howe, and "Dark Sky Preservation" by Rob Cordivari, leading up to "Stellar Death," a presentation by guest speaker Fronefield Crawford III. The event will conclude at 9:30 p.m. with drawings for scientific prizes.
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The foot lights from a passing pair of sneakers and the glare from patrolling police car headlights were the only sources of illumination for a recent nighttime gathering of about 100 people in Rose Tree Park. Young, old, human and nonhuman (dogs, not aliens) got together on a chilly Friday evening to explore a mystery of the universe - the night sky. But clouds blocked their view of the planets, so Scott Manning of Astronomy To Go focused the 25-inch, $7,500 telescope on an earthly point of light.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They could scarcely believe it: That red arc in the eyepiece was the upper edge of the sun. And those wafting, cloudlike things drifting into the blackness like mist coming off a river, so small and thin as to be barely perceptible, were actually plumes of gasses 25,000 miles high, three times the size of the Earth and the result of monstrous explosions in the cauldron of hydrogen at the center of our solar system. "Dang!" said a youth, as one by one he and his classmates mounted a small stool and peered intently through the eyepiece of the 16-inch telescope.
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | By Christine Ma FOR THE INQUIRER
Marty Malloy has seen the rings of Saturn, Neptune, and galaxies far, far away. And it all began with something he couldn't see: the moon. A couple of years ago, the West Chester Postal Service worker took his 9-year-old granddaughter to watch a lunar eclipse at an observing session sponsored by the Chester County Astronomical Society (CCAS). Both were captivated. "It's a different perspective," Malloy said. "Being raised in the city [Philadelphia], everything was tied to the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2000 | By Lloylita Prout, FOR THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER
Thought the Milky Way was just a caramel and chocolate candy bar adding inches to those hips? Not. Curious to know what else it could be? Join the Delaware Valley Amateur Astronomers club Saturday at Model Airplane Field in Valley Forge National Park for a star party. Peer through a telescope and be awed by this collection of about a hundred billion stars, dust, clouds and gases. Or gaze at the first-quarter moon with its craters and mountain ranges. Or study globular clusters and double stars.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
The Italian museum's director pulled out a stack of letters and, one by one, laid them atop his desk at the Institute and Museum of the History of Science in Florence. It was late 2007 and appeals were pouring in from museums in China, Korea, Germany, New York, Chicago, and a host of cities around the globe, though the International Year of Astronomy was still more than a year away. "Tutti vogliono il mio telescopio," Paolo Galluzzi said. "Everyone wants my telescope," the only remaining functional telescope made by Galileo Galilei, whom Albert Einstein called "the father of modern physics - indeed, of modern science altogether.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia homicide detectives arrested a 42-year-old Germantown man Friday in the slaying of a retired Villanova University professor who was stabbed to death in her apartment, near his home. Jose Diaz was charged with murder and related offenses in the killing of Carol Ambruster, 69, who was stabbed multiple times in the neck and chest. Ambruster's roommate discovered her body the night of Dec. 9 in the kitchen of her second-story apartment in the 5500 block of Wayne Avenue, the knife still in her neck.
NEWS
December 18, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CAROL AMBRUSTER didn't hesitate to speak her mind when she saw injustice. Like the time the Philadelphia Orchestra raised its single-ticket concert price to make it the most expensive in the nation. Carol hit the ceiling. "Oh, my heavens, it's really a slap in the face," she told an Inquirer interviewer in 2002. "It's the arrogance of the rich toward those of us who love music. " Carol M. Ambruster, a retired assistant astronomy and astrophysics professor at Villanova University, was stabbed to death Dec. 9 in her Germantown apartment at Wayne Avenue and School House Lane.
NEWS
December 14, 2013 | By Mike Newall and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
GERMANTOWN In life, Carol Ambruster was a collector of books, jewelry, stamps, antique bottles, and American Indian art. The rooms of the retired Villanova University professor's Germantown apartment were filled almost to the point of clutter, friends said. In death, the eclectic collections that filled her apartment are proving a challenge for police searching for clues as to who stabbed the former astronomy professor to death in her kitchen Monday night. Ambruster's roommate told police that he returned home just after 9 p.m. and found her on the kitchen floor, stabbed multiple times, the knife still in her neck.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY JASON NARK, SOLOMON LEACH & DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writers narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
IN A REMOTE CANYON in the scrubland of New Mexico, Carol W. Ambruster used to look up at the night sky brimming with all the stars that inspired her life's passion. The last things the retired assistant astronomy and astrophysics professor at Villanova University may have seen Monday in her Germantown apartment, however, were the eyes of a savage who brutally stabbed her. Ambruster, 69, was found dead about 9 p.m. inside the blood-spattered kitchen of her second-floor apartment, at Wayne Avenue and School House Lane, a knife still in her neck and additional wounds on her chest.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Mike Newall, and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
GERMANTOWN The Germantown apartment building where a retired Villanova University professor was found stabbed to death Monday night was not easily accessible to outsiders, one of the building's owners said Wednesday, suggesting that the woman might have known her killer. Carol W. Ambruster, 69, a retired professor of astronomy, was found by her roommate in the kitchen of her apartment in the 5500 block of Wayne Avenue with a knife in her neck about 9 p.m., police said. She also had been stabbed in the chest.
NEWS
June 2, 2012 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Rittenhouse spent months fine-tuning his handmade instruments and setting up a small observatory on the grounds of his farm, 20 miles outside the bustling young city of Philadelphia. On a clear June day in 1769, he was ready to participate in a landmark moment in science's efforts to measure the heavens. The rare event was called the transit of Venus, and it can be seen once again Tuesday evening - likely the last such chance for anyone now alive. For several hours, the path of Venus will take it directly across our view of the sun - looking something like a small blueberry against a fiery volleyball, for those with a telescope and proper eye protection (number 14 welder's goggles will work)
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Age mystics predict that December's turnover of the sacred Mayan calendar will bring death by flood, solar flares, or a catastrophic reversal of the Earth's magnetic field. Some even forecast that Earth will plunge into a gigantic black hole. But don't bet the farm on it, say archaeologists. This creative doom-saying stems from a calculation that archaeologist made in the 1980s, showing that the ancient Mayan timekeeping system was going to end, or cycle back to zero, for the first time since 3114 B.C. The date for this turnover - December 21, 2012 - is now known to the apocalyptically minded as Y12. It raises the question: Could God's odometer be running out?
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
The Italian museum's director pulled out a stack of letters and, one by one, laid them atop his desk at the Institute and Museum of the History of Science in Florence. It was late 2007 and appeals were pouring in from museums in China, Korea, Germany, New York, Chicago, and a host of cities around the globe, though the International Year of Astronomy was still more than a year away. "Tutti vogliono il mio telescopio," Paolo Galluzzi said. "Everyone wants my telescope," the only remaining functional telescope made by Galileo Galilei, whom Albert Einstein called "the father of modern physics - indeed, of modern science altogether.
NEWS
October 13, 2008 | By Gloria Hochman FOR THE INQUIRER
By day Steven E. Mazlin tends to his patients, those with multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, brain tumors, and other neurological ailments. When darkness comes, another world beckons, luring Mazlin down a curving staircase into the basement of his palatial Upper Makefield home and out to his one-acre backyard, where he begins the night's work. A board-certified neurologist in Langhorne, Mazlin is a self-described astrophotographer, one of maybe 100 in the country, 200 or so in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
The Chesmont Astronomical Society will present StarFest 2008 beginning at 4 p.m. Saturday at Warwick County Park in Pottstown. This educational event will feature guest speakers, children's activities, and astronomy presentations. Telescopes will be set up for solar observing from 4 to 6 p.m. Then, at 6 p.m., Kids Corner educational activities will begin, including a constellation scavenger hunt and crafts. Presentations are scheduled for 7 to 8:30 p.m., including "How to Get Your Picture in the NY Times," "What You'll See Tonight" by Martin Howe, and "Dark Sky Preservation" by Rob Cordivari, leading up to "Stellar Death," a presentation by guest speaker Fronefield Crawford III. The event will conclude at 9:30 p.m. with drawings for scientific prizes.
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