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Asylum Seekers

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NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Villanova University law professor Michele Pistone sensed the growing problem in the nation's asylum system even before new data released this month presented a stark picture of the backlog. "For 15 years, I could count on getting appointments for [asylum] interviews" promptly at the regional office in Newark, N.J., she said. "Students could start a [client's] case and have it adjudicated by the end of the semester. "This year, for the first time, that's not happening," she said, and appointments her students requested in September still have no interview dates.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During the six years he was detained in American jails after fleeing the slaughter of his country's civil war, Liberian refugee Jimmy Johnson wondered whether America truly was the land of the free. "I said to myself, 'This might not be the country for human rights that the rest of the world looks upon as a role model,' " Johnson said in a telephone interview Friday - four days after his release from York County prison. But now that he is free and staying in the Allentown home of supporter Helen Heilman, Johnson said, he had concluded that "this country isn't bad. Just a few people made it so hard.
NEWS
June 9, 2013
Up to 60 drown in Indian Ocean CANBERRA, Australia - A boat carrying up to 60 asylum seekers capsized in the Indian Ocean en route to Australia, with 13 people confirmed dead and no survivors found by the fourth day of searching, an official said Sunday. An air and search continued Sunday northwest of Christmas Island, an Australian territory. The boat was headed for Christmas Island, where Australia operates a detention camp for asylum seekers. The nationalities of those aboard were unknown.
NEWS
July 18, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A Cuban man tried to enter a U.S. government office here yesterday, but was seized and dragged away by Cuban police. U.S. diplomats here protested to Cuban authorities about the police action. It was not known whether the man was seeking diplomatic asylum, but nearly 20 Cubans have sought asylum at three other embassies here within the last 10 days. Yesterday afternoon, four young Cuban men climbed onto the roof of the Italian ambassador's residence and asked for asylum and help in leaving Cuba.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
DERBY LINE, VT. - A minivan with California license plates and a dozen passengers zipped across the border between Vermont and Quebec in October, heading north in a southbound lane unblocked by traffic. Border agents could only watch as the Dodge Caravan sped off into Quebec. But the vehicle and its occupants didn't try to disappear. About 22 miles later, they stopped in a Walmart parking lot in Magog, Quebec, and asked someone to call the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. After the Mounties arrived, the Gypsies in the vehicle applied for political asylum.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | Daily News wire services
Australian military boards refugees' freighter Australian troops today boarded a Norwegian freighter loaded with 434 stranded asylum seekers off remote Christmas Island after the ship broke into Australian territorial waters, the island's harbormaster said. Sydney media reported three high-speed boats met the container ship Tampa after it entered Australian waters. Australia has refused entry to the ship since Sunday, when it rescued the mostly Afghan asylum seekers from their sinking Indonesian fishing boat.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | Daily News wire services
Ex-con burned up over lack of toast An Alabama man has been convicted of shooting into his girlfriend's car because she didn't fix him toast for breakfast. Brian Heath Harrison, 23, of Excel, faces a prison sentenced of up to 20 years. Gena Mixon, 19, said Harrison flipped out when she didn't toast his bread on Jan. 8, 2001. She testified he dragged her by her hair, choked her, held a rifle to her head and put the barrel in her mouth. After Mixon packed her things and tried to leave, she said Harrison shot her car twice.
NEWS
November 4, 2002 | MICHELLE MALKIN
THERE'S a growing clamor for new congressional inquiries into how the Immigration and Naturalization Service recklessly releases illegal aliens like sniper suspect Lee Malvo - and then watches them disappear to commit brutal crimes against American citizens. A year ago, a Senate governmental affairs subcommittee convened an eerily prescient hearing on exactly the kinds of policies that led to illegal alien Malvo's quick and easy release - despite the Border Patrol's clear warning that Malvo and his mother were "likely to abscond.
NEWS
January 7, 2004
A worthy company I was disappointed to read the Dec. 28 article "Pension firm not a top choice" and the Dec. 30 editorial "The Philly way of making decisions" about the awarding of the contract to manage the city's pension holdings. Both pieces took a negative tone toward Fiduciary Investment Solutions, which has enjoyed a stellar reputation that I hope is not damaged by these writings. One fact is that FIS has a track record of positive results for a number of pension funds throughout the country.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By Shyama Venkateswar and Joel R. Charny
Whatever it signals about nuclear capability, this week's missile tests will aggravate the suffering of ordinary North Koreans. With U.S. sanctions already biting and U.S. humanitarian aid halted, Japan is considering more U.N. sanctions. Even South Korea says continuing food aid, hitherto decoupled from Pyongyang's behavior, "will be difficult. " North Koreans already face persecution, forced labor, economic collapse and chronic food insufficiency in their own country. And of the 50,000 North Koreans who have sought refuge in China, those forcibly repatriated face prison, "labor training centers," and even execution.
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NEWS
February 17, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Villanova University law professor Michele Pistone sensed the growing problem in the nation's asylum system even before new data released this month presented a stark picture of the backlog. "For 15 years, I could count on getting appointments for [asylum] interviews" promptly at the regional office in Newark, N.J., she said. "Students could start a [client's] case and have it adjudicated by the end of the semester. "This year, for the first time, that's not happening," she said, and appointments her students requested in September still have no interview dates.
NEWS
June 9, 2013
Up to 60 drown in Indian Ocean CANBERRA, Australia - A boat carrying up to 60 asylum seekers capsized in the Indian Ocean en route to Australia, with 13 people confirmed dead and no survivors found by the fourth day of searching, an official said Sunday. An air and search continued Sunday northwest of Christmas Island, an Australian territory. The boat was headed for Christmas Island, where Australia operates a detention camp for asylum seekers. The nationalities of those aboard were unknown.
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
DERBY LINE, VT. - A minivan with California license plates and a dozen passengers zipped across the border between Vermont and Quebec in October, heading north in a southbound lane unblocked by traffic. Border agents could only watch as the Dodge Caravan sped off into Quebec. But the vehicle and its occupants didn't try to disappear. About 22 miles later, they stopped in a Walmart parking lot in Magog, Quebec, and asked someone to call the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. After the Mounties arrived, the Gypsies in the vehicle applied for political asylum.
NEWS
March 21, 2012 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer
AREN, A TRANSGENDER refugee from Iran, was in a library in Northeast Philly last year when something surprising caught his eye: The Philadelphia Gay News . "I've never seen a newspaper that's gay," he recalled the other day. "I think, 'Wow! They are so free [in the U.S.].' " Aren, 24, who did not want his last name published, is one of the first four refugees classified as lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender (LGBT) who have been resettled in Philadelphia by the Nationalities Service Center, the city's largest refugee-resettlement agency.
NEWS
August 6, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"Attention," to quote Arthur Miller, "must be paid": In New York this year, the Brits walked off with all the major Tony Awards (Billy Elliot, God of Carnage, and The Norman Conquests) in addition to fielding a slew of strong nominees. In fact, producers of American contenders were moved to write to Tony voters in a moment of xenophobic panic, urging them to consider their shows because they were "American plays. " Well, the British are coming. Again. Actually, the National Theatre's production of Phedre, starring Helen Mirren, is already being broadcast here in movie theaters, there are plans for War Horse to turn up next year, and Jude Law's Hamlet moves to Broadway next month.
NEWS
January 11, 2008 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Egyptian Sameh Khouzam, who for a decade has fought deportation from the United States, was ordered freed from York County Prison by a federal judge in Scranton yesterday. But even as supporters set out to rejoice came word from the Justice Department that it intends to appeal Judge Thomas Vanaskie's order, said paralegal Kathleen Lucas, a local coordinator for Amnesty International. Justice Department spokesman Charles Miller did not immediately return a call for comment.
NEWS
July 7, 2006 | By Shyama Venkateswar and Joel R. Charny
Whatever it signals about nuclear capability, this week's missile tests will aggravate the suffering of ordinary North Koreans. With U.S. sanctions already biting and U.S. humanitarian aid halted, Japan is considering more U.N. sanctions. Even South Korea says continuing food aid, hitherto decoupled from Pyongyang's behavior, "will be difficult. " North Koreans already face persecution, forced labor, economic collapse and chronic food insufficiency in their own country. And of the 50,000 North Koreans who have sought refuge in China, those forcibly repatriated face prison, "labor training centers," and even execution.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Two former Afghan generals who had apparently hoped to live quietly as political refugees in the Netherlands instead have found themselves in a Dutch court, accused of crimes committed during their homeland's Soviet occupation in the 1980s. Heshamuddin Hesam, 57, and Habibulla Jalalzoy, 59, senior officials of the feared Khad secret police during that period, are accused of torture and war crimes at the first trial of its kind in the District Court of The Hague. Witnesses have testified that they had been beaten, starved, deprived of sleep for days and given hours of electric shocks until they passed out from pain.
NEWS
June 21, 2004 | MICHELLE MALKIN
DO YOU know how the alleged "shopping-mall bomber" entered our country? He didn't cross the border illegally. He came through the front door - at America's invitation. Nuradin M. Abdi, who was indicted recently for plotting with al Qaeda to blow up an Ohio shopping mall, flew here from Somalia and received bogus "refugee" status in 1999. Prosecutors allege that Abdi then fraudulently obtained a refugee travel document, and flew to Ethiopia for jihad training. After returning, Abdi blended back in along with tens of thousands of other refugees from a country known to be a breeding ground for Islamic terrorists.
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