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NEWS
March 21, 2011 | By Greg Bensinger, Bloomberg News
AT&T Inc. agreed to buy T-Mobile USA from Deutsche Telekom AG in a cash-and-stock transaction valued at about $39 billion, a combination that would create America's largest mobile-phone company. The purchase will be made with $25 billion in cash and the balance in AT&T stock, subject to adjustment, according to a statement issued Sunday. The deal may give Deutsche Telekom an 8 percent stake in the Dallas carrier, which will add a Deutsche Telekom executive to its board of directors. The deal would allow AT&T, now the second-largest U.S. wireless operator, to add about 34 million customers and surpass Verizon Wireless.
SPORTS
June 28, 2011 | by the Daily News
What: AT & T National Where: Aronimink Golf Club, Newtown Square When: Thursday-Sunday; gates open 6:30 a.m. Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. Saturday and Sunday TV: Golf Channel: Thursday and Friday, 3-6 p.m. CBS: Saturday 3-6 p.m.; Sunday, 3-6:30 p.m. Tickets: Call 800-594-TIXX. Tickets for Thursday or Friday cost $40; Saturday or Sunday are $45. Other packages at attnational.org. Parking: Free general admission parking at White Lot at the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center in Oaks, about 8 miles from golf course.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. yesterday said it agreed to pay $250 million to buy Paradyne Corp., a Largo, Fla., maker of communication equipment that last year pleaded guilty to charges of conspiracy to commit fraud. The acquisition is the largest by AT&T since its divestiture five years ago and comes a week after the communications company agreed to buy Eaton Financial Services of Boston. Under the latest deal, AT&T will pay $10.25 in cash for each of Paradyne's outstanding shares.
NEWS
March 23, 2011
It's hard to see how a merger that will take a spirited competitor out of the U.S. wireless market will mean anything for consumers in the shortrun other than higher prices and less choice. But it doesn't have to be that way. With the announcement that AT&T plans to take over fourth-place wireless carrier T-Mobile, consumer advocates were struggling to come up with a list of the potential upsides. So what if T-Mobile customers might be able to switch to an iPhone? They could do that now, if they pay the going rate at either AT&T or Verizon Wireless, the other major player in the wireless market.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1988 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
American Telephone & Telegraph Co. is telling its Phone Center Store employees that they could lose their jobs or be transferred if they do not meet long-established but previously unenforced sales quotas by the end of this month. The ultimatum affects about 2,800 members of AT&T's retail sales force nationwide, a company official said yesterday. According to the Communications Workers of America, which represents the salespeople, many of the workers were hired as service clerks before the company had any serious challengers in the consumer and small-business market.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1987 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
The helicopter touched down on time at Penn's Landing, but the limousine driver got lost on the way to the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel, so the 45- minute interview in which Vittorio Cassoni was to explain his plan for salvaging AT&T's shaky computer business got compressed into half an hour. The former Olivetti executive met the challenge by barely stopping to breathe - a trick he's practiced plenty since November, when he was named head of AT&T's data-systems division and gave himself three years to straighten out its myriad problems: An anemic product line, no clear marketing strategy, a bloated staff and consequent stupendous losses.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - The end might be near for AT&T Inc.'s proposed $39 billion purchase of T-Mobile USA Inc. Facing growing opposition, AT&T announced Thursday that it was withdrawing its merger plan from further consideration by the Federal Communications Commission. Instead, it said it would concentrate on winning approval from the U.S. Justice Department, which sued to stop the purchase. And, in case the deal collapses, the company said it was setting aside the $4 billion it would owe in breakup fees to T-Mobile's German owner, Deutsche Telekom.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's still American Telephone & Telegraph Co., but all it has left is telephones. The telecommunications company said yesterday it had "withdrawn" its telegraph service because of obsolescence. AT&T's telegraphs never were the clicking-key type, tapped dit-dot-dit by railroad station agents linking small-town America with the wider world. That was Western Union Corp., also now defunct. AT&T's telegraph service ran another staple oftelecommunication's somewhat more romantic past - the rhythmic teletypes pounding away in newsrooms and the ticker-tape machines linking stock brokers' offices with Wall Street.
BUSINESS
September 1, 2011 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - The Justice Department's rejection of AT&T's proposed purchase of T-Mobile USA will test new federal guidelines on challenging mergers and the companies' resolve in forming the nation's largest wireless carrier. A courtroom battle is likely and could wring out information that the companies would prefer to keep private. Still, AT&T Inc. has a big incentive to fight: If the deal is called off, the company has to pay a $3 billion breakup fee and surrender some of its unused spectrum for wireless communications.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faced with growing competition, American Telephone & Telegraph Co. yesterday cut international long-distance rates by an average of 10 percent for calls to 32 countries and territories. The new rates undercut some offered by MCI Communications Corp. and GTE Sprint Communications Corp., and representatives of those firms said yesterday that they might respond with their own rate reductions. AT&T expects its international-rate cuts - the fourth round since 1982 - to save customers $150 million a year.
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SPORTS
June 23, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is viewed as the best NHL draft since the epic 2003 class, which means the Flyers picked a good time to have a bad season. They will draft seventh and 29th in the first round Friday in Sunrise, Fla., and those picks, from all accounts, should produce high-quality players in time. The last time the Flyers had two first-round picks was in 2003, when they selected Jeff Carter 11th and Mike Richards 24th. Yes, the Flyers, owners of seven picks in the first four rounds, would gladly settle for draft choices who develop into those type of players.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Eleven months after AT&T Inc. announced its $48.5 billion deal for DirecTV that would create a substantially bigger pay-TV company than Comcast Corp., the deal seems to be cruising smoothly through Washington, while Comcast's $45 billion deal for Time Warner Cable Inc. has faced a public backlash. The deals - Comcast announced its in February and AT&T disclosed its in May - have been a surprising tale of two giant telecom mergers. AT&T/DirecTV seemed initially to have the harder climb to federal approvals because of classic anticompetitive elements of the transaction.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2014 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
The buzzer rang Monday on Comcast Corp.'s costly bid to televise Astros baseball and Rockets basketball games in the Houston area. A partnership of DirecTV and AT&T Inc. took possession of CSN Houston's studios near the Toyota Center and laid off 75 of the 141 employees of the bankrupt, Comcast-controlled regional sports network. The legal and financial tussle over the Rockets and Astros games has been watched nationally as evidence of a limit to how much regional sports networks can charge pay-TV distributors.
NEWS
October 2, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas R. Haff, 89, a former AT&T financial executive, died of congestive heart failure Friday, Sept. 27, at the Evergreens, a continuing care retirement home in Moorestown. Mr. Haff, who was born in Minneapolis, trained fighter pilots during World War II. Though he was stationed in the United States, at one time "he trained Chinese fighter pilots and they didn't speak any English," but his communication skills did the job well, daughter Jane Fish said. Mr. Haff had graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in 1942, concentrating on business and engineering.
SPORTS
June 28, 2013 | Associated Press
BETHESDA, Md. - Roberto Castro missed the U.S. Open at Merion. It felt as if he was playing one yesterday in the AT&T National at Congressional. The course that has hosted three U.S. Opens looked as though it could hold another in a moment's notice. Only a dozen players shot in the 60s, with Castro leading the way at a 5-under 66 that required some of his best golf. He made three straight birdies late in his round with a 20-foot putt, a perfect 3-wood into a par 5 and a chip-in.
SPORTS
June 20, 2013
Tiger Woods said Wednesday that soreness in his left elbow would keep him from defending his title next week in the AT&T National at Congressional, and that he would not compete again until the British Open next month at Muirfield. The strain in his left elbow first became apparent during the opening round of last week's U.S. Open at Merion, when Woods was seen flexing his left wrist or holding his arm behind his back after shots out of the thick, punishing rough. In the first match-play round of the USGA Women's Amateur Public Links in Norman, Okla., Louise Yi of Cinnaminson defeated Abby Newton of Katy, Texas, 6 and 4. Aurora Kan of Avondale defeated Hannah Wood of Centennial, Colo., 2 and 1. TENNIS: The All England Club released the seedings for Wimbledon, which starts Monday.
SPORTS
May 24, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Aronimink Golf Club president Paul Coady thought that hosting the AT&T National for two years was a "good experience" for his members and appreciated the nice comments from officials of the tournament founded by Tiger Woods. But as far as the possible return of the PGA Tour event to the Newtown Square course after it completes its contract with Congressional Country Club in 2014, it's a matter of: not so fast. Coady said Wednesday there have been no discussions with AT&T National officials.
SPORTS
May 21, 2013 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
BETHESDA, Md. - The head of the Tiger Woods Foundation still smiles broadly when asked about the contributions of the officials, staff and golf course at Aronimink Golf Club during the two years the Newtown Square facility hosted the AT&T National. And with the PGA Tour event founded by the world's No. 1 player entering the last two years of its contract with Congressional Country Club, it could find a home at Aronimink again. Greg McLaughlin, president and chief executive officer of the Tiger Woods Foundation, said Monday he has stayed in touch with Aronimink officials since the tournament left Delaware County and would love to return there if Congressional did not wish to renew its contract with the event.
SPORTS
March 21, 2013 | The Inquirer Staff
Jeremy Underwood came off the bench to score 19 points and lift North Carolina A&T over Liberty, 73-72, in Dayton, Ohio, at the First Four on Tuesday. The Flames - only the second team ever to make the NCAA tourney with 20 losses - had a chance to win it at the end. John Caleb Sanders drove coast to coast and flipped up a left-handed layup in heavy congestion that just missed. Jean Louisme grabbed the defensive rebound and, while Sanders rolled in pain on the baseline, the Aggies (20-16)
NEWS
February 23, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Services are set for Friday for the Rev. Alphonse T. Mascherino, 69, a Downingtown native who founded the Flight 93 Memorial Chapel in Shanksville, Pa., after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He died Friday, Feb. 15, of cancer at a hospice in Somerset, Pa., where he lived. "Father Al" attended Bishop Shanahan High School through the 11th grade before graduating from St. Mary Seminary, formerly in Penndel. His brother, Jim, said that after the attacks, Father Mascherino felt that although a national monument at Shanksville was in the works, the relatives of those killed in the crash should have a place to go in the meantime.
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