CollectionsAtari
IN THE NEWS

Atari

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 8, 1990 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Atari Corp. has agreed in principle to buy a Chester County plant where it will make liquid-crystal displays for hand-held computers and video games. LCDs made in the Chester County plant will replace part of the supply that Atari now gets from Japanese manufacturers, said Gregory A. Pratt, chief financial officer of Atari. Atari has agreed to buy the idle Lionville factory from Eagle-Picher Industries Inc. of Cincinnati for $5.2 million, Pratt said. The deal is scheduled to close in late April or early May. The purchase will be a new Philadelphia-area foothold for Jack Tramiel, who resigned under pressure in 1984 from the post of chief executive officer of Commodore International Ltd. in West Chester.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1987 | By G. Pascal Zachary, Knight-Ridder Newspapers (Inquirer staff writer Andrea Knox contributed to this article.)
When Jack Tramiel was unceremoniously booted out as chief executive officer of Commodore International Ltd. three years ago, it took him only three months to find another personal-computer company to run. The company was Atari Corp., which had nearly gone belly-up in the video- game business. It was so sick that its owner, Warner Communications Inc., handed it over to Tramiel for a virtually worthless IOU, which Warner wrote off its books soon after the sale. Now, the worm has turned.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
The Atari Corp. has decided against investing an estimated $5.2 million in a new liquid crystal manufacturing facility in Chester County, a plant that would have brought 200 manufacturing jobs to the area. Atari executives announced last March they had agreed to buy a 43,485- square-foot building on 4.9 acres in Lionville from Eagle Picher Industries of Cincinnati. The purchase was to be financed in part with a $2 million, 3 percent loan from a state fund earmarked for companies creating new jobs in advanced technology industries.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Vyola P. Willson, Special to The Inquirer
Low-interest state loans may have helped persuade Atari Corp. to locate its new liquid crystal manufacturing plant in Chester County. Atari Corp. of Sunnyvale, Calif., announced plans last week to buy a 43,485-square-foot building on 4.9 acres in Lionville's Pickering Creek Industrial Park from Eagle Picher Industries Inc. of Cincinnati. The project is expected to total $5.2 million, about half for the acquisition of the land and buildings and half for the purchase of equipment and building improvements.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1987 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Atari's purchase of a retail store chain that's a major U.S. distributor for Atari's rival, Commodore International, could have a negative effect on West Chester-based Commodore, an analyst said today. Jay D. Samstag, vice president and technology anaylst for Duff & Phelps, a Chicago brokerage firm, added that the purchase of Federated Group by Atari could become really nasty because Jack Tramiel, Atari's chief executive, left his job as Commodore's president two years ago on less than friendly terms.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1988 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hey, vidkid. Flick on the old TV and get ready to play a fast, giddy, desperate game of Who Gets the Billions in the wild and crazy video-games industry. That's right, video games. You know, the things you popped into your video system in the early '80s and played on your TV - until you and millions of other vidkids got bored and sent the industry into a tailspin. Well, vidkid, that's changed. The most dramatic nose-diver in the history of the electronics industry is making the most dramatic comeback since Lazarus.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The new video-game systems people will be playing this year are coming in much smaller packages, or in high-tech versions delivering vivid cartoon-like visuals, stunning stereo sound effects and more levels of play. Naturally, they'll cost an arm and a leg - $90 to $200 for a basic player unit, $20 to $50 for each game title, hundreds more for accessories. But what price glory? The games of '89 will let you carry on heated combat with another player in the backyard, on the school bus or even when you're miles away from each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1989 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
Pac-Man must be gobbling aspirin - this summer, no fewer than four new video-game systems have been announced and will be hitting the stores before Christmas. Nintendo, which owns 80 percent of the market, is getting the most hype with its new portable Game Boy ($90). "Game Man" is more like it. Game Boy is a Walkman-size unit for gamers on the go. Portable stereo headphones are included to make it possible to hear the digital stereo sound, and with Nintendo's Video Link hookup, you can play head-to-head competition with a friend toting a second Game Boy. In direct competition with Game Boy is Atari's new Portable Color Entertainment System ($150)
BUSINESS
January 22, 2013
In the Region   Track expansion to bring crude oil to region   CSX announced a $26 million track capacity expansion on its River Line between Albany, N.Y., and North Jersey, enabling the railroad operator to handle more trains moving crude oil to East Coast refineries. Demand for crude oil in New Jersey and the Philadelphia area "may be as much as five trains per day, or over 400,000 barrels, over the next couple of years," Oscar Munoz, executive vice president and chief operating officer, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1990 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer
Commodore International Ltd. yesterday confirmed that it was working with Nolan K. Bushnell, who founded Atari Corp. and developed the Pong video game, on the development and marketing of consumer products that would extend the capabilities of its Amiga computer. The West Chester company said it had hired Bushnell as general manager of consumer interactive products, a new position, and that it would introduce the first of its new interactive products June 2 at the Consumer Electronics Show in Chicago.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2014 | By Terri Akman, For The Inquirer
Julie Bogle, 10, and her sister Mallory, 7, are mean Skylanders players. But surprisingly, so are parents Jeff and Jill. In fact, video games are the Exton family's favorite pastime. It started about three or four years ago when the girls received a Nintendo Wii and had trouble managing the controller and "nunchuk" at the same time, so the parents paired up to help them. "It was fun and quickly became a tradition," recalled Jeff, 38, who says their family now plays together at least once every other week.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
HADDONFIELD Cameron P. Lyon had reached his goal of having "a reputable, highly regarded tree care company and a loving family to share it with," his web page said. His work and safety precautions were widely praised across the leafy borough, especially on Woodland Avenue, where he had pruned and removed several trees. This week, residents on the street teared up upon learning of Lyon's accidental death on the job Thursday. Some gathered outside to share the news and remember him. Lyon, operator of Lyon & Son Tree Service in Barrington, was working in the 400 block of Chews Landing Road shortly after 8 a.m. when he fell from a tree, acting Police Chief Ted Stuessy said Friday.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2013
In the Region   Track expansion to bring crude oil to region   CSX announced a $26 million track capacity expansion on its River Line between Albany, N.Y., and North Jersey, enabling the railroad operator to handle more trains moving crude oil to East Coast refineries. Demand for crude oil in New Jersey and the Philadelphia area "may be as much as five trains per day, or over 400,000 barrels, over the next couple of years," Oscar Munoz, executive vice president and chief operating officer, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2011 | By Terence Chea, Associated Press
PALO ALTO, Calif. - A mid-1980s in-house video shows Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs recalling a seminal point in Silicon Valley history: the moment about 35 years ago they named their upstart computer company - destined, as it turned out, to become a tech behemoth. "I remember driving down Highway 85," Wozniak says. "We're on the freeway, and Steve mentions, 'I've got a name: Apple Computer.' We kept thinking of other alternatives to that name, and we couldn't think of anything better.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't even that close. On Monday night, the IBM program named Watson, fresh from flattening the best human Jeopardy! players in history last month, squared off against five members of Congress on Capitol Hill. Congresspeople? No contest, right? On this night, man defeated machine. Rep. Rush Holt (D., N.J.) won $8,600 in "earnings" from his correct answers, to Watson's measly $6,200. (No real money was involved.) Was it fair, though? Holt, who holds a doctorate in physics, was assistant director of the Plasma Physics Laboratory at Princeton University from 1989 to 1998, when he ran for Congress and won. He represents the 12th Congressional District - a research- and education-heavy midstate swath extending from the border to the Manasquan Inlet, and including towns such as Princeton, Trenton, Freehold, and Sea Bright.
NEWS
June 2, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Sandra Schulberg was last in college, Richard Nixon was president, The Godfather was in theaters, and Atari had come out with its first generation of video games. But turns of fortune - both bad and good - prevented the then-Swarthmore College undergraduate from finishing the senior thesis needed to earn her bachelor's degree in anthropology. Over the last 36 years, Schulberg - niece of Budd Schulberg, who wrote the screenplay for On the Waterfront, and daughter of the late Stuart Schulberg, once the producer of the Today show - has become an accomplished independent filmmaker, albeit without that bachelor's degree.
NEWS
January 12, 2008 | By SOLOMON JONES
REMEMBER the days when people would say, "Thank you," and others would respond by saying, "You're welcome"? How 'bout when folks said, "Excuse me" if they bumped into you on the street? Here's another blast from the past: "Can you pass me the salt . . . please?" Don't get me wrong. I'm not some crusty old fuddy-duddy claiming to have walked 10 miles through 5 feet of snow to get to my one-room schoolhouse on the side of a mountain. I didn't hand-crank my jalopy back when gas was 3 cents a gallon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2006 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Philly Classic began in 1999, video gamers lauded it for the stroll down memory lane it provided. Classic participant Ed Fleming, 32, wanted to do more, much more. A longtime gamer, who started writing video-game reviews when he was 15, Fleming wanted to stage an event that encompassed all gaming consoles, arcade cabinets, games and players. Old and new. He has done that with America's VideoGame Expo. This weekend marks its second year, and the Valley Forge Convention Center will be packed with gaming tournaments, discussion panels and seminars, a huge arcade with more than 100 cabinets, and vendors selling the latest games, including Splinter Cell: Double Agent, and rare items for Atari and other older systems.
NEWS
September 19, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of all the members of the Black Eyed Peas, Stacy "Fergie" Ferguson seemed the least likely to forge her own career. She always seemed like the fifth wheel, a cheerleader in a male-dominated group. But on her solo debut, Fergie comes out sexy and strong. The Dutchess (will.i.am/A&M Records . ) doesn't start auspiciously. The first track, "Fergalicious," a slice of old-school, beatbox hip-hop, sounds like a naked attempt to re-create Nelly Furtado's hit "Promiscuous. " But the album quickly hits its stride with keepers like the bumping club hit "London Bridge," a bodacious bomb worthy of Missy Elliott, and the bouncy ballad "All That I Got (The Make Up Song)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2004 | By Dana Reddington INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With spring comes baseball, and this year, with baseball comes a new Phillies stadium. What's not to be excited about? The Franklin Institute will build on that momentum with its Spring Training Day festivities on Saturday. The annual event ties in with the institute's Sports Challenge exhibition, which examines the science involved in sports. It also features contests, prizes and appearances by the Phillie Phanatic, Comcast SportsNet anchors John Marzano and Matt Yaloff, Phillies announcer Dan Baker, and Phillies organist Paul Richardson.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|