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Athena

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NEWS
May 17, 2010
This week's Adopt-a-Pet at the Pennsylvania SPCA is Athena, a 2-year-old pit-bull mix. Athena is calm, cool and cuddly, but she had a rough life before she was rescued by the PSPCA's Humane Law Enforcement officers. She is easy to walk on a leash, and would do well in a home with children. She would prefer to be the only pet in her new home. For more information about Athena, please contact the PSPCA, 350 E. Erie Ave., at 215-426-6300, or visit www.pspca.org . The $75 adoption fee includes spaying, vaccinations, microchipping and three weeks of veterinary care.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few days after a statue of Athena was stolen from Bryn Mawr College, revenge came. A memo appeared yesterday in nearly every mailbox at neighboring Haverford College claiming that Bryn Mawr's president had been named acting president there. The hoax memo, written on stationery from Haverford's Office of the President and signed "Cheers! Tom Kessinger," had more than a few students, staff members and professors at both schools thinking it was true. Kessinger is stepping down after this school year, and an interim chief could be named as early as next week.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The larger-than-life statue of Athena at Bryn Mawr College - bruised and beheaded when a prank by students at neighboring Haverford College went awry last month - will be restored. And then she'll be retired. But before the statue is moved to its new home, it will cost five Haverford students $6,000. That's the estimate a conservator gave Bryn Mawr to repair the obsidian sculpture. The school will divide the bill - $1,200 each - among the culprits. Bryn Mawr spokeswoman Debra Thomas said she does not expect any hassles collecting from the Haverford students.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Athena has lost her head, her arm and her standing, and now Bryn Mawr College students worry they are going to be lost without her. And down Lancaster Avenue, the loss for some Haverford College students may be financial and substantial. Athena is an obsidian statue that for many years has stood in M. Carey Thomas Great Hall at Bryn Mawr. She is as old as the college (founded 1885) and was a gift from Thomas, the school's first dean and second president. Bryn Mawr women long have sought guidance from her during final exams and other times of stress; finals are coming up, but Athena won't be there to help.
SPORTS
June 10, 2005 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Billy Wright is thankful. The Pennsauken athletic director appreciates everything track and field has provided. Wright graduated from Norfolk State University, thanks to a track scholarship to run distance races. He met his wife, Fe, while living in Saudi Arabia as an assistant track coach for that country's national team. Track also took Wright to the University of Mississippi, where, after serving as an assistant coach, he received a master's degree. These days, the track is where Wright goes to see his daughters, Vanessa and Athena, shine.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2015
Yasmine Mustafa thought she'd be protecting women from attack by now. But over the last year, the cofounder and CEO of Roar for Good L.L.C., a Philadelphia self-defense technology company, has learned that personal ambition takes a backseat to the frustrating realities of hardware and software development. "I learn best from my mistakes. It's fortunate I make so many," Mustafa said good-naturedly. She hopes most of them are behind her now that Roar has launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo for its wearable help-summoning and alarm device, Athena.
NEWS
January 17, 1993 | By John V. R. Bull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Superb homemade dishes at Athena, the friendly Greek restaurant in Glenside, are cogent reminders of the delights of this Mediterranean cuisine. The wonder is that there are so few Greek restaurants in our area. Athena replaced a pizza shop in the Keswick Plaza shopping center nearly two years ago after one of Athena's owners left It's Greek to Me, the excellent Greek restaurant in Doylestown that is now out of business. Although popular locally, Athena has not been widely known.
NEWS
May 2, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
When Sharon Sharp rented a video of the 1988 film "Gorillas in the Mist," a biography of naturalist Dian Fossey starring Sigourney Weaver, it made her think of the ancient Greek goddess Artemis. When she checked out "The Piano," starring Holly Hunter, she thought of Aphrodite, goddess of love. Julia Roberts in the movie "I Love Trouble" brought the goddess Athena to mind. Clearly, Sharp, an associate professor of education at Pembroke State University in North Carolina, is into goddesses.
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
At first glance - always dangerous where Medusa is concerned - Nancy Vickers' scholarly crush on the Gorgon Gal with the eternal bad-hair day seems as odd as Susan Sontag's announcing that she's a Betty Boop fan. In one corner, you have a millennia-old symbol of female monstrousness who either (a) seduced the sea god Poseidon or (b) was raped by him in the Temple of Athena. True to the dubious damn-the-facts, full-speed-ahead ethics of Greek mythology, Athena punished Medusa by turning her luxuriant tresses into slithering snakes, her gaze into an instant death sentence for folks who made eye contact, and her head into a detachable weapon endlessly brandished by Perseus, the son of Zeus who severs it, to petrify his enemies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
"The Incredible . . . Hercules"? Following perhaps the most epic Hulk story ever seen in comics and with interest in the Hulk at a fever pitch leading into this past weekend's movie opening, it would take a truly larger-than-life character to take over the Jade Giant's long-running "Incredible Hulk" title. Consider those big shoes - or in this case, big sandals - filled. With great art, exciting stories, witty banter and epic stories that take us back and forth between Mythic Greece and world-saving jaunts in the modern Marvel Universe, Comics Guy finds it hard to believe anyone who picks up this title will be anything but entertained.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 2015
Yasmine Mustafa thought she'd be protecting women from attack by now. But over the last year, the cofounder and CEO of Roar for Good L.L.C., a Philadelphia self-defense technology company, has learned that personal ambition takes a backseat to the frustrating realities of hardware and software development. "I learn best from my mistakes. It's fortunate I make so many," Mustafa said good-naturedly. She hopes most of them are behind her now that Roar has launched a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo for its wearable help-summoning and alarm device, Athena.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | BY GLORIA HOCHMAN, For the Inquirer
DENNIS KYRIAKATOS is lying on the table in operating room 15 at Temple University Hospital, just minutes away from life-changing surgery. Sterile, green surgical cloth drapes his body, exposing only his torso. The antibacterial solution chlorhexidine painted on his chest and abdomen has turned his skin into a mustard-colored canvas. He has been anesthetized for more than an hour. At 75, Kyriakatos suffers from a faulty mitral valve, which allows blood to flow into the heart's main pumping chamber.
NEWS
May 17, 2010
This week's Adopt-a-Pet at the Pennsylvania SPCA is Athena, a 2-year-old pit-bull mix. Athena is calm, cool and cuddly, but she had a rough life before she was rescued by the PSPCA's Humane Law Enforcement officers. She is easy to walk on a leash, and would do well in a home with children. She would prefer to be the only pet in her new home. For more information about Athena, please contact the PSPCA, 350 E. Erie Ave., at 215-426-6300, or visit www.pspca.org . The $75 adoption fee includes spaying, vaccinations, microchipping and three weeks of veterinary care.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2008 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
"The Incredible . . . Hercules"? Following perhaps the most epic Hulk story ever seen in comics and with interest in the Hulk at a fever pitch leading into this past weekend's movie opening, it would take a truly larger-than-life character to take over the Jade Giant's long-running "Incredible Hulk" title. Consider those big shoes - or in this case, big sandals - filled. With great art, exciting stories, witty banter and epic stories that take us back and forth between Mythic Greece and world-saving jaunts in the modern Marvel Universe, Comics Guy finds it hard to believe anyone who picks up this title will be anything but entertained.
SPORTS
June 10, 2005 | By Keith Pompey INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Billy Wright is thankful. The Pennsauken athletic director appreciates everything track and field has provided. Wright graduated from Norfolk State University, thanks to a track scholarship to run distance races. He met his wife, Fe, while living in Saudi Arabia as an assistant track coach for that country's national team. Track also took Wright to the University of Mississippi, where, after serving as an assistant coach, he received a master's degree. These days, the track is where Wright goes to see his daughters, Vanessa and Athena, shine.
NEWS
October 15, 2003 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
At first glance - always dangerous where Medusa is concerned - Nancy Vickers' scholarly crush on the Gorgon Gal with the eternal bad-hair day seems as odd as Susan Sontag's announcing that she's a Betty Boop fan. In one corner, you have a millennia-old symbol of female monstrousness who either (a) seduced the sea god Poseidon or (b) was raped by him in the Temple of Athena. True to the dubious damn-the-facts, full-speed-ahead ethics of Greek mythology, Athena punished Medusa by turning her luxuriant tresses into slithering snakes, her gaze into an instant death sentence for folks who made eye contact, and her head into a detachable weapon endlessly brandished by Perseus, the son of Zeus who severs it, to petrify his enemies.
SPORTS
April 17, 2002 | By Mel Greenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was at least one major surprise at the Women's Big Five annual awards reception last night. A new honor - City Series player of the year - was introduced to recognize individual performance, specifically in the round-robin pursuit of the Big Five title. The winner was Temple senior Athena Christoforakis, who helped lead the Owls to a 4-0 sweep and their first outright Big Five crown since the 1985-86 season. Temple coach Dawn Staley received her second consecutive coach-of-the-year award and St. Joseph's senior Susan Moran was named player of the year in the event at Finnegan's Wake.
NEWS
December 9, 2001 | By Catherine Quillman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Alice Strine, a resident of Rose Valley, a former educator, and a lawyer, was presented with the 2001 Athena Award at the Women In Business Expo luncheon on Thursday at the Corporate Events Center at Drexelbrook in Drexel Hill. The annual award recognizes individuals who have achieved excellence in their careers and what the event organizers call community work in assisting women "in attaining their full potential. " The award was cosponsored this year by the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce and Meissner Chevrolet-Oldsmobile.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The larger-than-life statue of Athena at Bryn Mawr College - bruised and beheaded when a prank by students at neighboring Haverford College went awry last month - will be restored. And then she'll be retired. But before the statue is moved to its new home, it will cost five Haverford students $6,000. That's the estimate a conservator gave Bryn Mawr to repair the obsidian sculpture. The school will divide the bill - $1,200 each - among the culprits. Bryn Mawr spokeswoman Debra Thomas said she does not expect any hassles collecting from the Haverford students.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A few days after a statue of Athena was stolen from Bryn Mawr College, revenge came. A memo appeared yesterday in nearly every mailbox at neighboring Haverford College claiming that Bryn Mawr's president had been named acting president there. The hoax memo, written on stationery from Haverford's Office of the President and signed "Cheers! Tom Kessinger," had more than a few students, staff members and professors at both schools thinking it was true. Kessinger is stepping down after this school year, and an interim chief could be named as early as next week.
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