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NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Atlantic City region is on the brink of a short-term economic disaster. Atlantic City made history 36 years ago when it opened the first legal casinos in the United States outside Las Vegas. Now it's doing so again as casino employment - which for years exceeded the number of city residents - drops precipitously after a decade of steady decline. The closing of three casinos, starting with Showboat and Revel this weekend followed by Trump Plaza two weeks later, and the rapid-fire loss of 5,700 jobs, draw historic comparisons to longer-term collapses of U.S. industries such as steel.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - This resort faces the prospect of having four major vacancies on its famed Boardwalk come mid-September. The grim reality sank in July 14 when Trump Plaza issued layoff notices and targeted Sept. 16 as the date to cease operating as a casino. Perception is reality in tourism, experts say, and the Boardwalk is synonymous with Atlantic City. How will four hulking, empty buildings sit with visitors - especially at night - and will they impede tourism when Atlantic City needs it the most?
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
EVEN THE LATE "positive thinking" avatar Norman Vincent Peale would have a tough slog finding optimism over Atlantic City's current state, what with gaming revenues running about half of what they were eight years ago and three casinos set to turn out their lights by mid-September. But everything is relative. Compared with 50 years ago this week, the town is Las Vegas, Paris and Rio de Janeiro combined. The resort's post-World War II decline was exacerbated by what should have been a triumph: Atlantic City had won the right to host the Democratic National Convention.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The closure of three Atlantic City casinos by mid-September will wipe $2 billion from property-tax values next year, exacerbating the financial plight of the already cash-strapped city, Mayor Don Guardian warned Tuesday. By 2017, Guardian said on a conference call to discuss Atlantic City's way forward as a center of tourism, property values are expected to have fallen as low as $7.5 billion, from $20 billion five years ago. In the short term, Guardian said, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs has made money "available for some bridge loans to make sure that the city continues functioning with this year's budget because of any concern that we might have that a casino's closing, going bankrupt, might hold off payments.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
As painful as the Sept. 2 closure of the Revel casino in Atlantic City will be for the more than 4,000 employees who work there, it could help spur a sale of the $2.4 billion property, a Revel attorney said in bankruptcy court Monday. None of the bidders who submitted bids by the Aug. 4 deadline were willing to operate Revel as it exists and bankroll losses of between $1 million and $2 million a week. "It may be that some of the dust has to settle from our shutdown," John K. Cunningham, a White & Case L.L.P.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Members of the clergy locked arms as they led a march of about 400 Unite Here Local 54 members in "a prayer vigil for Atlantic City's service economy" on Wednesday night. "This is union territory," the casino workers chanted as they marched along New Jersey Avenue amid car horns honking in support. Many held signs, including Linda Bragg, 56, of Atlantic City, who works at Bally's. Hers read: "Atlantic City - Broken Promises. " "We don't want to be a forgotten town," she said.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - This town isn't Las Vegas, but the $2.4 billion Revel Casino wants to take visitors there with A-list entertainment, posh rooms, and celebrity-chef restaurants in a luxurious setting where the champagne and water in 10 swimming pools are always flowing. The 20-acre resort - draped in silvery-blue reflective glass - literally curls to and fro like the ocean it embraces. Many see Revel as the lifeline for this down-on-its-luck gambling mecca in need of a revival.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - With the Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino's expected closing, Donald Trump, whose name is emblazoned on the casino and who once owned three of the gambling palaces here, said he can't help but feel bad for the resort he helped build. In an interview Monday, Trump also predicted that an oversaturation of casinos would mean more closings in other places, including the Philadelphia area. Trump endured multiple bankruptcies as head of Trump Entertainment Resorts Inc., and he and his name will always be linked with Atlantic City even if his share of the casinos is now only about 10 percent.
NEWS
February 22, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Jeffrey Barton moved to the Shore from Redondo Beach, Calif., a year ago to cash in on an unprecedented building boom here. "I'm here for one thing," said Barton, 44, who makes $31.97 an hour as a tile finisher. "The work. " There are plans over the next four years for $20 billion worth of casino, hotel, restaurant and retail construction and renovation projects, many of which began in 2003. And in a slowing national economy, all that development is attracting construction workers from around the country.
NEWS
September 14, 1987 | Special to the Daily News by Mary D'Anella
The women have arrived in Atlantic City for the Miss America Pageant, and they're hard at work. Miss Nevada, Stacie James, works out on a Nautilus machine; Miss Texas, Jo Thompson, gives an interview. They're all hoping to be named Miss America 1988 on Saturday night.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Atlantic City region is on the brink of a short-term economic disaster. Atlantic City made history 36 years ago when it opened the first legal casinos in the United States outside Las Vegas. Now it's doing so again as casino employment - which for years exceeded the number of city residents - drops precipitously after a decade of steady decline. The closing of three casinos, starting with Showboat and Revel this weekend followed by Trump Plaza two weeks later, and the rapid-fire loss of 5,700 jobs, draw historic comparisons to longer-term collapses of U.S. industries such as steel.
NEWS
September 1, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Toni Peterson was among the last customers to leave the Showboat casino Sunday afternoon as "closed" signs went up, bringing an end to the Mardi Gras-themed gaming hall and hotel that opened on the Boardwalk 27 years ago. "We're going to miss it," said Peterson, who came from Brooklyn for the day to say goodbye to Showboat, where she had been a customer for the last eight years. Caesars Entertainment Corp.'s closing of Showboat marked the start of a wave of casino-industry downsizing in Atlantic City that will eliminate 5,700 jobs in the next two weeks.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The closure of three Atlantic City casinos by mid-September will wipe $2 billion from property-tax values next year, exacerbating the financial plight of the already cash-strapped city, Mayor Don Guardian warned Tuesday. By 2017, Guardian said on a conference call to discuss Atlantic City's way forward as a center of tourism, property values are expected to have fallen as low as $7.5 billion, from $20 billion five years ago. In the short term, Guardian said, the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs has made money "available for some bridge loans to make sure that the city continues functioning with this year's budget because of any concern that we might have that a casino's closing, going bankrupt, might hold off payments.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
EVEN THE LATE "positive thinking" avatar Norman Vincent Peale would have a tough slog finding optimism over Atlantic City's current state, what with gaming revenues running about half of what they were eight years ago and three casinos set to turn out their lights by mid-September. But everything is relative. Compared with 50 years ago this week, the town is Las Vegas, Paris and Rio de Janeiro combined. The resort's post-World War II decline was exacerbated by what should have been a triumph: Atlantic City had won the right to host the Democratic National Convention.
SPORTS
August 26, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
ATLANTIC CITY - Following more than 2 years out of the spotlight, Saturday's comeback fight certainly didn't transpire the way Mike Jones likely drew it up in his head. The aftermath had the Mount Airy native compressing a bag of ice to his face as he visited briefly with family and friends and then headed to the hospital. Once less than 3 1/2 minutes from hoisting the IBF welterweight belt, Jones again faces an uncertain future in his sport. Twenty-six months after Randall Bailey knocked him out at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Jones had another night spoiled via upset, this time by unheralded 25-year-old Jaime Herrera at Bally's Atlantic City.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
In an Atlantic City conference room filled with people who had just paid $1,000 to learn how to grow marijuana, the speaker asked if anyone in law enforcement was among the crowd. No one's hand shot up. "That does not mean they're not here," Adam Scavone, a New York City lawyer, cautioned the nearly 80 people who attended Oaksterdam University's course at Bally's Wild Wild West Casino on Saturday. There, just off the boardwalk, the West met the East as the California-based school held its first marijuana-growing seminar on this side of the country.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 100 slot machines in 11 Atlantic City casinos are now linked with more than 600 machines at casinos in Nevada under a new effort to generate larger jackpots for gamblers, the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement announced Thursday. "Much like multistate lotteries, this new technology and cooperative regulatory agreements will allow combined progressive jackpots to grow, which should be very appealing to players looking for the opportunity to play for huge jackpots," said David Rebuck, New Jersey's director of gaming enforcement.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Members of the clergy locked arms as they led a march of about 400 Unite Here Local 54 members in "a prayer vigil for Atlantic City's service economy" on Wednesday night. "This is union territory," the casino workers chanted as they marched along New Jersey Avenue amid car horns honking in support. Many held signs, including Linda Bragg, 56, of Atlantic City, who works at Bally's. Hers read: "Atlantic City - Broken Promises. " "We don't want to be a forgotten town," she said.
NEWS
August 22, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Mark Manzoni, a bartender at the doomed Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City, has a manila envelope in his hand and a smile on his face. "I just got a job," the Galloway Township resident says. "My last shift at Revel ends at 8 a.m. on Labor Day, and I go down to Maryland Sept. 2. " Manzoni, 50, was the first to arrive and the first hired during the job fair sponsored Tuesday and Wednesday by the Maryland Live! Casino. With the Atlantic Club already dark and Revel, Showboat, and Trump Plaza scheduled to shut down within weeks, an estimated 8,000 Atlantic City casino workers will have lost their jobs this year.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
ATLANTIC CITY - Mike Jones is comfortable discussing the night of June 9, 2012, down to the stunning uppercut that derailed his promising ascent up the boxing ranks. Even 2 nights ago, after arriving at the venue at which he will make his comeback, the Mount Airy native sat at a table and re-enacted his errors the two times Randall Bailey caught him, displaying the faulty positioning and overanxious jabs that did him in, the corrections he failed to make. Ahead on all three judges' scorecards, Jones, then a 29-year-old rising star, was less than 3 1/2 minutes from claiming the vacant IBF welterweight belt when Bailey knocked him out. For 2 weeks afterward, he said, he didn't do a thing.
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