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NEWS
July 5, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the 1920s, in Atlantic City, there were no segregated beaches in the resort town, and black residents rented bathing suits from bathhouses and waved from Miss America Parade floats like any other bathing beauties. But by 1928, influential hotel owners were pressured by wealthy white guests who did not want to "bathe side by side with colored bathers," to quote a letter on Hotel Strand letterhead, a copy of which is in the new blockbuster exhibit "Jet Black, Brown and Tan on the Beach," at the city's Arts Garage at 2200 Fairmount Ave., across from Angelo's.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | BY MICHAEL KLEIN, Philly.com Staff Writer mklein@philly.com, 215-854-5514
ED HITZEL, 64, known for tough but fair restaurant reviews as well as an encyclopedic knowledge of the Jersey Shore restaurant and food scene, died Monday. Hitzel, who lived in Mays Landing, was stricken during dinner with friends at the Maplewood, in Hammonton, whose spaghetti he frequently raved about. His wife of 33 years, Susan, told the Press of Atlantic City that the cause was cardiac arrest. Hitzel, the Longport-raised son of an Atlantic City hotelier, rose from a copy boy in the 1970s to editing jobs at the Press , then left in the early 1990s to publish Ed Hitzel's Restaurant Magazine.
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a space that looks like a warehouse in the back of a Hatboro candy shop, Sean Shanahan ignites the flame beneath a 40-year-old copper vat. Holding a long wooden paddle, Shanahan, 30, an apprentice at the family-owned Stutz Candy Co., adds a few more ingredients to his cauldron. Butter. A bit more sugar. And even more heavy cream. Then, he stirs. This is the beginning of fudge, 64 pounds of glop, churned until it bubbles. It has been the same inelegant start for that classic summer indulgence since the Stutz family started making its version in 1938.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In the latest bid to strengthen Atlantic City as a shopping and entertainment destination, developer Bart Blatstein unveiled the first floor of his $50 million venture, the Playground, to an enthusiastic crowd Thursday. T Street - an urban streetscape lined with bars and live entertainment intended to resemble Music Row in Nashville - is to open to the public on Friday. The city's Who's Who of politicians, local business leaders, and prominent residents, among others, got a sneak peak at a VIP event Thursday evening.
NEWS
June 27, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Atlantic City is one step closer to getting a PILOT to steer it through rough economic seas. On Thursday, the New Jersey Senate passed a rescue package, including the long-awaited PILOT - Payment in Lieu of Taxes, a new casino taxation system - and other bills aimed at stabilizing the city's dire finances. The bills, stalled since December amid political wranging and an unsettled labor situation at Trump Taj Mahal, now go to Gov. Christie. The bills have been endorsed by both the casino industry and elected officials, including Mayor Don Guardian, who has said the stabilized tax system under the new PILOT was better than defending against repeated tax appeals that have put the city near bankruptcy.
NEWS
June 17, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Incapable of resuscitating Atlantic City, Trenton is moving to euthanize it by legalizing casinos in North Jersey. It's a bad move for the state and especially for Atlantic City, whose dire condition is Exhibit A in the case against relying on gambling for an economic revival. Atlantic City saw four of its 12 casinos close last year. Though the downward trend was apparent for years as the city struggled with competition from casinos in Pennsylvania and other nearby states, officials were slow to take steps to diversify the resort's economy.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph F. Tomasello, 61, of Cape May Court House, an Atlantic County sheriff's officer from 1980 to 2005, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday, June 9, at home. Born in Hammonton, Mr. Tomasello graduated from Pleasantville High School and served in the Army in West Germany in the 1970s. He returned to duty in the New Jersey Army National Guard, where he was a supply sergeant in charge of weapons at the National Guard armory in Atlantic City, said his wife, Irene. Mr. Tomasello joined the National Guard in the late 1970s, his wife said, and retired in 2005, at the same time that he retired from the sheriff's office.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
Until the last minute, Philadelphia NAACP president Rodney Muhammad was set to denounce a developer who intends to build a casino in South Philadelphia. Muhammad was to star at a City Hall news conference Thursday to release a report on alleged racist practices by Baltimore-based Cordish Cos. He decided not to attend, he said Friday, after receiving a call from Mayor Nutter, who said they needed to talk, and a second call from national NAACP officials. Without Muhammad's presence, the news conference, organized by Jason Ortiz, a managing director with consulting firm Metropolitan Public Strategies of New York, unraveled.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOMERS POINT, N.J. - Poetry was apparently too controversial for Atlantic City this year, as a plan to pay poets to read their work at the city Farmers' Market was abandoned by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority after some political blowback. But Somers Point has held the line against the (haiku) haters - naming, and paying, the bay town's first poet laureate, Northwestern grad-turned-wine-store-event-planner Maria Provenzano of Egg Harbor Township. Provenzano, 26, will put the concept to its first real test Saturday night, as she does two short, mostly unannounced "Pop Up Poetry" events, one at 7 p.m. at the bar at Sandi Point Coastal Bistro, formerly the famed Mac's, followed by another at Gregory's.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - State Senate President Stephen Sweeney is facing growing political pressure to allow legislation to proceed that would ask voters in November to decide whether to expand casino gambling beyond Atlantic City. Yet Sweeney (D., Gloucester), who has the authority to decide which bills are posted for a vote, does not appear willing to budge. High-ranking North Jersey Democrats, including Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto of Hudson County and Senate Budget Chairman Paul Sarlo of Bergen County, support a ballot question this year.
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