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NEWS
October 22, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Billionaire Carl Icahn won Round One in a Wilmington bankruptcy court on Friday, when a judge ruled to nullify Unite Here Local 54's contract pertaining to health-care and pension benefits for Trump Taj Mahal casino workers. But he will face a tough fight from New Jersey lawmakers, who have indicated they will not back his request for massive state aid to keep the casino operating in Atlantic City. Icahn owns a $286 million first lien debt on the Taj. After the judge's ruling, Icahn revised his financial request seeking aid from the state.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
For much of U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo's nearly 20 years representing New Jersey's Second Congressional District, the Democratic Party has put forth what can only be described as cannon fodder to oppose the Republican - obscure candidates with little chance of victory. But not this year. Northfield lawyer Bill Hughes Jr., the son of the congressman LoBiondo replaced in 1995, is a worthy foe. But the potential that Hughes' candidacy represents is no match for LoBiondo's record, which suggests he's still the right person for the job. This is a critical time for the Second District, which stretches from the Atlantic Ocean to the Delaware River, including Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland, and Salem Counties and parts of Camden, Gloucester, Ocean, and Burlington Counties.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In a packed church here last week, the Second Congressional District candidates, incumbent Republican Frank LoBiondo and his Democratic challenger, Bill Hughes Jr., were like two fighters in a ring. LoBiondo, 68, the elder statesman, was seated to the right of Hughes, the bespectacled attorney 21 years his junior whose father retired after 20 years in Congress, making way for LoBiondo in 1994. An interpreter translated the steady stream of questions in Spanish from a line of constituents that formed inside New Jerusalem Church.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal bankruptcy judge on Friday allowed the owners of Atlantic City's bankrupt Trump Taj Mahal Casino Resort to void its contract with its 1,100 union workers. Whether the $15 million in savings will be enough to keep the doors of the troubled casino open is nowhere near a sure bet. In a decision delivered in a Delaware courtroom, Judge Kevin Gross granted a request by the casino's owners, Trump Entertainment Resorts, to end the contract, cutting health and pension benefits.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Jen A. Miller, For The Inquirer
In 2008, the Atlantic City Marathon celebrated its 50th anniversary. It had been the third-longest continually run marathon in the United States and a fixture on the Jersey Shore race scene. But in 2009, that continuity was threatened when organizers announced they would no longer put on the race. While runners scrambled to find alternative events so that their training wouldn't be wasted, the Milton and Betty Katz JCC in Margate met with the volunteer group that had been putting on the race and asked if there was any way the JCC could help.
NEWS
October 18, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Saying it "sometimes takes more than medicine" for a hospital to build a healthy community, AtlantiCare on Thursday launched an initiative to help defray health-care costs for thousands of Atlantic City workers who have lost jobs because of recent casino closures. AtlantiCare president and CEO David Tilton said the AtlantiCare Community Healthcare Access Program (CHAP) is being funded by the hospital's foundation, and is intended to provide laid-off casino workers from Atlantic, Cape May, and Southern Ocean Counties with education, counseling, and assistance with health insurance coverage and options.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
As shell-shocked officials scramble to help Atlantic City out of its downturn, it is essential to remember just why voters approved casino gambling there in 1976. Casinos were supposed to be a "unique tool for urban redevelopment of Atlantic City. " That is, the casinos should support New Jersey, not the other way around. A scheme concocted by Trump Entertainment would turn that purpose on its head. The company wants to sell the faltering Trump Taj Mahal to investor Carl Icahn, who would put up $100 million.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
MAYS LANDING, N.J. - Tears rolled down Steven Pratt's face in an empty courtroom Tuesday and guilt spilled from his mouth. Pratt, 45, stood alone without an attorney, his hulking frame hunched over as he sobbed, and he seemed eager to skip the proceedings and head back to the place he's called home for 30 years - prison. Pratt is accused of beating his mother, Gwendolyn Pratt, to death on Sunday, less than two days after she picked him up from Bayside State Prison and threw him a welcome-home party at their house in Atlantic City.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - As city police hauled away about two dozen of his casino union brethren in handcuffs at a mass protest last week, longtime Trump Taj Mahal bartender Al Messina couldn't help but wonder aloud: Is this what 24 years comes down to? What happened to the bond between the casino industry and its workers? Messina and about 6,000 employees were part of Atlantic City history on April 2, 1990, when the Taj, then dubbed the "eighth wonder of the world" by founder and former owner Donald Trump, opened.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia developer Bart Blatstein said Sunday he and casino architect Paul Steelman had agreed to buy the four-story, 300,000-square-foot, half-empty Caesars Pier shopping center in Atlantic City for a small fraction of its construction cost. A person familiar with the deal said Blatstein and Steelman agreed to pay $2.8 million. That's less than 2 percent of the $200 million-plus that developer Taubman Centers of the Detroit suburbs and other investors plowed into the project in the mid-00s.
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