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NEWS
May 7, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Amid the tumult of layoffs, a busy Mayor Don Guardian declared a summer of entertainment, then vowed to try to save Stockton University's "island campus" project. Guardian laid out an impressive to-do list for the season during a conference call with reporters Tuesday. After declaring his beleaguered but resilient Boardwalk town the "entertainment capital of the Jersey Shore," Guardian said he was convening a meeting Friday to try to coax a settlement in the Stockton standoff.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2015 | Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The parent company of Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa boosted its 2015 earnings target for the Atlantic City property to $165 million from $160 million after a strong first quarter. Boyd Gaming Corp., of Las Vegas, on Thursday reported first-quarter net revenue for Borgata of $182.6 million, up 9 percent from $167.3 million in the same period a year ago. The market-leading casino's operating profit nearly doubled to $37.8 million from $20.5 million, thanks in part to a property tax benefit.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY, N.J. - The roller-coaster ride on which Stockton University has found itself in recent weeks can end well if everyone pulls together, the school's interim leader suggested Wednesday. After 35 years at Stockton, most recently as provost, Harvey Kesselman's last few weeks there may prove to be his most difficult. Before he leaves July 1 to become president of the University of Southern Maine, Kesselman has a variety of tasks to undertake - finding an interim president to replace him, updating the university's governance structure, and either salvaging a deal to convert the former Showboat casino into a campus in Atlantic City or selling the property.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - After 20 days in the dark, power was restored to the Revel property shortly after 11 a.m. Wednesday, but the future of the former casino hotel remained murky. Lights began to gradually come on in the 47-story tower that once was the $2.4 billion Revel, as the result of a temporary deal between new owner Glenn Straub and the energy company built to power the 6.2 million-square-foot property. Timothy Lowry, attorney for ACR Energy Partners, said the company's agreement to turn on the power was the result of a deal orchestrated by U.S. District Judge Jerome Simandle.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the latest whiplash-inducing turn of events at Stockton University, its outgoing president said Tuesday he is stepping down immediately rather than four months from now, as the school initially announced. Herman J. Saatkamp Jr., amid controversy over his stymied attempt to locate a Stockton campus in the former Showboat casino in Atlantic City, announced last week that he would step down some time after Aug. 31. On Tuesday, he announced he was taking an immediate medical leave. Harvey Kesselman, the university's provost, will become acting president.
NEWS
April 30, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Lawmakers are considering waiting until next year to try to expand gambling to North Jersey. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) first signaled support for the idea last summer, arguing that revenue generated by North Jersey casinos could be shared with Atlantic City to help revitalize the decimated resort. The state constitution restricts gaming to Atlantic City, so the move would require an amendment passed by the Legislature and approved by voters. Lawmakers could put a gaming measure on the ballot in November.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Kevyn Orr, the bankruptcy attorney whose Detroit credentials set off alarms on Wall Street when he was appointed by Gov. Christie as part of an Atlantic City emergency management team, is leaving the post, the governor's office said Monday. Orr's role was described as "counsel" to Kevin Lavin, the full-time emergency manager, whose duties to date have been mostly those of a super-auditor of the city's finances. Lavin is being paid $135,000 a year; Orr's compensation, billed by the hour, has not been made public.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The road to Revel was paved with good . . . wait, the road to Revel actually was paved last week. That in and of itself was a small miracle in Atlantic City: the long-awaited smoothing over of formerly soul-jarring main drag Pacific Avenue. But, oh, the rest of it. Atlantic City seemed to be in the grip of an unprecedented array of ego-clashing, head-scratching, logic-defying sagas, as it tries to sweep up after a year of economic collapse. Even for Atlantic City, which has long attracted big, inscrutable egos to the Boardwalk, from Donald Trump to Mr. Peanut, the last month has been, well, weird.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge in Camden on Friday blocked Glenn Straub's short-term plan for restoring electricity to the former Revel Casino Hotel in Atlantic City. The temporary restraining order by U.S. District Judge Jerome B. Simandle prevents Straub's company, Polo North Country Club Inc., from hooking up generators to equipment owned by the building's utility provider, ACR Energy Partners L.L.C. Straub said he was stuck between Atlantic City officials, who are fining him $5,000 a day for not having electricity in the building, and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, which said the generators he rented do not meet environmental regulations.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - A stagehand died this week after falling while working on a concert venue at the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa. Tony Haines, 61, of Atlantic City, died Sunday after falling off the top-level bleacher section of the Event Center at Borgata. Sources say he was tearing up a set with elevated seating for the headliner act the night before, the comedian Jerry Seinfeld, when he fell about 12 feet to the ground. The show was sold out, so bleacher seating was needed. It remained unclear why Haines lost his balance.
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