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NEWS
February 24, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
One summer in the 1960s, when he was in his 40s, John F. Born took his family on a vacation in New England. "We came across a rail yard in Vermont, and he was struck by the mechanical beauty of the locomotives," his son Matthew recalled. "He became kind of a rail fan, and a couple of times a year, he would go on short trips and photograph railroads all over the country. " Eventually, his son said, Mr. Born became a contributor to the Triumph series of books about the former Pennsylvania Railroad published by Barnard, Roberts & Co. That was just for fun after he retired, his son said.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 44 years old, Stockton University is experiencing a growth spurt. The school, known until last week as Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, has broken enrollment records four years in a row, expanded its geographic footprint into Ocean and Cape May Counties, and opened a slew of graduate programs. By fall, a new campus at the former Showboat Casino will fully open in Atlantic City and house Stockton's hospitality program and provide space for dance, music, and theater programs.
NEWS
February 21, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - They gave up their city cars. Or, in the words of city resident Frank "@JitneyGuy" Becktel, "HOLY C--- THEY'RE GIVING UP THEIR CARS. " Yes, the City Council of Atlantic City did what many in this turbulence-struck seaside town thought would never happen - they relinquished full-time use of city-funded cars. With Atlantic City in the dual grip of a fiscal meltdown and multiple emergency state overseers, City Council members said the time had come to park the cars back on the lot. "We're not in La-La land," said Council President Frank M. Gilliam Jr. He said the move was symbolic and wouldn't save much money.
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the frantic final minute, everybody in the sold-out gymnasium was on edge. Except Lamar Thomas. "I felt great all day," Atlantic City's junior guard said. "I knew we were going to win this game. I even knew it in the last minute. " Thomas backed up his positive thoughts with some productive play as Atlantic City rallied to edge Holy Spirit 54-53 in a Cape-Atlantic League American Division instant classic Wednesday night. Thomas hit a three-pointer with 44 seconds left to cut Holy Spirit's lead to 53-52, then lifted a steal and fed junior Jamir Prevard for the winning layup with 0:12 on the clock before a roof-raising crowd in Holy Spirit's gymnasium.
NEWS
February 20, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Financial pressure on Atlantic City will intensify this year as taxable real estate values are expected to plummet to $7.35 billion from more than $11 billion last year. But instead of sharply raising the tax rate as the city has done in each of the last two years to keep revenues stable, the city is taking a sharper scalpel than ever to its operations, Mayor Don Guardian said Wednesday evening in his State of the City address before the City Council. "This year we have no intention of doing that," Guardian said, referring to boosting the property-tax rate.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In what is expected to be one of the most hotly contested and expensive legislative races in the state this year, Republican Assemblyman Chris A. Brown announced his reelection campaign Saturday alongside Atlantic City Mayor Don Guardian. The sprawling Second District includes Atlantic City, which is in the midst of an economic meltdown after four casinos closed last year, taking with them 8,000 jobs. The resort is desperately seeking other revenue sources to keep municipal services and city government running.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's no doubt Mayor Don Guardian is serious about cutting the cost of Atlantic City government. On Wednesday, when Guardian delivers his "State of the City Address" to Atlantic City Council, he is expected to talk about plans to cut $15 million from the city's payroll budget as part of an effort to drastically reduce the cost of governing the city. When he rises to speak, Guardian does so as the only New Jersey mayor with a casino industry, one planted there by the state in the 1970s.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa, Atlantic City's highest-grossing and most profitable casino, logged excellent fourth-quarter financial results, Boyd Gaming Corp., its managing partner, reported Thursday. "We set all-time quarterly records for market share in every single metric, including table win, slot win, poker, and gross gaming revenue," Keith Smith, Boyd's president and chief executive, said on a conference call with analysts. "We're seeing growth in our non-gaming business as well.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Revel curse struck again Tuesday, as the bankrupt Atlantic City casino hotel terminated its $95.4 million deal with Florida investor Glenn Straub. If U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Gloria M. Burns approves the move - which also means that Revel would keep Straub's $10 million deposit - it will be the second time a bankruptcy sale of the $2.4 billion Revel evaporated in acrimony. Burns set a Wednesday hearing. Brookfield Asset Management Inc., of Toronto, walked away in November from its deal to buy Revel for $110 million, abandoning its $11 million deposit.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2015 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - When Ralph Hunter Sr. saw Glynnis Reed arrive at her new exhibition in the city's Arts Garage the other day, he walked across the hall from his African American Heritage Museum to tell her how much he thought of her work. The exhibition, called "Ascending Beauty," features mesmerizing digital creations composed of Reed's photographs of African American women set against, inside, behind, and through her photographic images of nature. Hunter, 77, said he was so taken by a piece titled Bessie - a portrait of Reed's grandmother, sculpturally ending just below the shoulders, bustlike, with painterly light and greenery streaked around and across her face - that he bought it on the spot.
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