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NEWS
January 20, 2016
By Frank Gilliam The behavior of the New Jersey government toward Atlantic City in recent days can be compared to that of a mugger - a robber who takes his victim's money, demands his jewelry, and then threatens to shoot him for not having enough money. Let me explain. While it's without doubt that Atlantic City faces difficult financial circumstances, much of the difficulty is caused by the state. For decades, the state and its agencies have treated Atlantic City as their own bank, taking more than $1 billion.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, Staff Writer
Campaigning in Iowa during the weekend, Gov. Christie wouldn't say whether he supports Senate President Stephen Sweeney's plan for a state takeover of Atlantic City. But he said the local government hadn't done enough to turn around the beleaguered Shore resort's finances. "We now need to get the government under control in Atlantic City," Christie said after a town hall meeting in Fort Dodge. "The government in Atlantic City - and I've said this under the previous mayor, many times, and the current council - they cannot control themselves to do the job the right way," Christie said.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Gov. Christie and the Legislature are about to pull the plug on what's left of Atlantic City's economy, but they lack the decency to say so. They're touting tax benefits for all as they ask voters to approve casinos in North Jersey, which would further drain an Atlantic City economy struggling to recover from the recent loss of four of its 12 casinos. "The additional competition will likely cause more casinos to close" in Atlantic City, Moody's Investors Service declared. The legislation to allow the northern casinos, sponsored by State Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
The emergency manager appointed by Gov. Christie to analyze Atlantic City's finances said Friday that "parochial" political interests were impeding progress there and endorsed a state takeover of local government. In his final report to the governor, Kevin Lavin said the city must enact structural changes and take bolder steps to cut costs, by monetizing assets to close a projected $300 million deficit over the next five years and be financially stable thereafter. He did not recommend bankruptcy.
SPORTS
January 17, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
This wasn't a night when anybody was going to bust loose for 25 or 30 points with a lot of smooth moves and sweet finishes. Not the way both teams were playing defense. Not the way the whistles kept stopping the flow of the showdown between Atlantic City and Holy Spirit before a capacity-plus crowd on the Spartans' home court. But for Atlantic City sophomore Ray Bethea, his team's 56-46 victory still marked something of a breakout game. The 6-foot-4 Bethea generated 14 points, eight rebounds, and four steals, flashing the kind of athleticism that has veteran coach Gene Allen imagining the possibilities in the future.
NEWS
January 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Stockton University has gotten off the Showboat roller-coaster. After months of legal wrangling, political fights, and millions of dollars spent on maintenance and security at the empty building, the university finally sold the former casino property in Atlantic City. "Stockton is closing this chapter in our history, and moving on to exciting plans for the university's future," Harvey Kesselman, the university's president, said in a statement Friday. The Philadelphia-based developer Bart Blatstein bought the property for $23 million, inheriting a legal mess but clearing Stockton to move forward with other plans.
NEWS
January 16, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
Authorities are investigating the death of a Camden County woman whose body was found in a wooded area Monday. New Jersey State Police on Thursday identified Danyelle Minerva, 19, of Atco, as the woman whose remains were found in a wooded part of Salem County. The cause of death remained unknown Thursday. Investigators are considering her death potentially suspicious because of where the body was found, said Sgt. Jeff Flynn, a state police spokesman. "You have to look at it as suspicious, preliminarily," Flynn said.
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Expanding gaming to North Jersey could force more casinos to close in Atlantic City, Moody's Investors Service warned Wednesday, adding that such a result would increase the likelihood that the ratings agency would downgrade the resort town's credit. "We view any gaming supply expansion in New Jersey as particularly bad news for the already struggling Atlantic City gaming market," Moody's analysts wrote, adding that gaming revenue in the city had declined about 7 percent in the 12 months that ended Nov. 30. The report comes after Gov. Christie and lawmakers announced Monday that they had reached an agreement on a proposed constitutional amendment to add two casinos in separate counties in North Jersey.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Andrew Seidman, STAFF WRITERS
Despite all the Trenton backroom convulsing in the previous 24 hours over Atlantic City, Gov. Christie didn't say a word in his State of the State speech Tuesday about the place. But he was about the only one who stayed silent. Christie's presence, and those of other power brokers, was clearly being felt as a new state takeover plan was threatened, last-minute changes were crunched into a casino tax stabilization bill, and a North Jersey casino referendum compromise was reached. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
The New Jersey Economic Development Authority approved $68.3 million in tax credits Tuesday toward the development of Stockton University's planned residential campus in Atlantic City. The EDA approved up to $38.4 million for construction of a residence hall and academic building and up to $29.9 million for construction of a parking garage. The project is planned for about six acres at the southern end of Atlantic City, by the intersection of Atlantic, Albany, and Pacific Avenues. "This is another positive step in developing the public-private partnerships that will enable Stockton to move forward with the AC Devco project for a residential campus and academic facilities, benefiting both our students and the region," said Harvey Kesselman, president of Stockton.
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