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Atom Bomb

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NEWS
March 2, 1994 | By TRUDY RUBIN
A slight, quiet Iraqi with a will of steel named Dr. Hussein Sharistani may have helped prevent a nuclear disaster in the Middle East. Sharistani was the top scientific advisor to Iraq's nuclear energy commission in 1979 when Saddam Hussein asked him to help develop a nuclear bomb. The Toronto-trained nuclear physicist said "no" - an act equivalent to an unarmed David defying a 20-ton Goliath. He was brutally tortured, spent 12 years in prison (10 in solitary confinement) and escaped during the Gulf War bombings by means which outdo Houdini.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1986 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Complementing its exhibition of contemporary Japanese photography, the Philadelphia Museum of Art is hosting a four-week festival celebrating films of the Japanese vanguard. Experimental films are to their commercial counterparts what poetry is to prose. This weekend's selections of nine experimental shorts range from surrealist haiku like Navel and A-Bomb, in which Eiko Hosoe likens the atom bomb to a child without a navel, to Sakumi Hagiwara's Mist, a continuous take of mist lifting above the treetops.
NEWS
June 22, 2001
IF "PEARL HARBOR" and its stars do not get Oscars, Hollywood is like everything today - fixed. We did nothing wrong by interning Japanese in this country to be watched. How did we know who could be trusted? If a teacher can't find which child had done something wrong, the whole classroom is punished. The United States should never be ashamed we did that. We were just being careful and protecting ourselves. Some say we were wrong for dropping the atom bomb on Japan.
NEWS
November 14, 1986
Albert Einstein was reported to have said, about the atom bomb, that "everything has changed, except the way we think. " The news is full of perfect illustrations of this now that the possibility of abolishing nuclear weapons is getting serious consideration. Secretary of Defense Caspar W. Weinberger says that if we give up the nuclear option we will have to have a buildup and dependency on conventional weapons. Unless we of the peace movement nail this nonsense for what it is, effectively and quickly, the public will as usual believe whatever it hears.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The past is arranged, unopened, on the dining room table - locked in old newspaper clippings, yellowed letters from former comrades, an album of faded black-and-white photos. Al Purdy reaches for the photographs. They are of a place he saw as a young man, a place few cared to visit at the time. There he is, with a buddy standing in front of a wooden sign: Hiroshima City Hall. There he is, holding a piece of atomic rubble. There they are, the corpses of buildings, trees denuded of leaves, stubborn sticks standing in a desert of debris.
NEWS
April 25, 2002 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The central question in Copenhagen - why did Werner Heisenberg visit Niels Bohr at his home in the Danish city in late September 1941? - is, on the face of it, not one to send people streaming into a theater for an answer. Yet for those who welcome the challenge of a play that demands concentrated attention yet offers no definite answers to this or many other questions - indeed, one whose very premise is that certainty is impossible - Michael Frayn's drama is a stimulating, satisfying theatrical experience.
NEWS
February 16, 1995 | BY MSGR. S.J. ADAMO
I suppose it was bound to happen: war without boundaries. War, that is, that involved everyone: old men, women, children. It was the nature of con flict: everyone was in it, more or less. There were to be no more civilians in contrast to the military, no more non-combatants. Everyone was in the same boat: fighting for the survival of the nation. But not everyone was armed or able to protect himself against attack. Civilians were helpless, relatively speaking. But they were the glue that kept the nation united during its agony.
NEWS
August 6, 1995
THE MORAL IMPERATIVE TO BUILD THE BOMB I have no doubts my father was involved in a righteous cause. In a dim way, I even envy him: What could be more exhilarating than to know that the fate of the world rests on your work - and that you are fighting the good fight? Nor did my father have any doubts. "There are a lot of things to go to hell for, but working on the bomb isn't one of them," he would say, bristling, when the morality of working at Los Alamos came up. The Fascists and Nazis had stripped him of his position, driven him from his homeland.
NEWS
May 26, 1997
Don't compare Okla. bombing with Hiroshima Robert S. McElvaine's "Found guilty by association: It's more common than we think" (Inquirer, May 19) illustrates the ignorance of the writer. Comparing the Hiroshima atom bomb attack with the dastardly and cowardly Oklahoma federal office bombing is not even comparing apples and oranges. I was a combat correspondent with the Fifth Marine Division during World War II. We had returned to our Hawaii rest camp following 36 days of bitter combat on Iwo Jima.
NEWS
November 24, 1991 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hideko Yoshiyama was a 22-year-old clerk when the atom bomb fell on Nagasaki 46 years ago. She has been recovering ever since, hospitalized 19 times for a variety of radiation-related maladies, from breast cancer to thyroid infections. She happened to be standing in front of a large glass door when the bomb Fat Man fell on the city with the explosive blast of 22 kilotons of dynamite, triggering a fireball that sent ground temperatures over 5,000 degrees. The explosion turned the glass door to splinters and filled Yoshiyama's face and body with thousands of jagged crystals.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2016
ISSUE | HIROSHIMA Brass opposed bomb The commentary on the 1945 debate about whether to use atomic bombs to end World War II perpetuates the fiction that "within government circles, there was little question that the bomb should be used" ("The momentous decision to use atomic bombs," Friday). Many prominent military leaders strenuously objected to using the weapon: Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower said that dropping the bomb was "completely unnecessary . . . as a measure to save American lives.
NEWS
May 28, 2016
By Gino Segrè and Bettina Hoerlin President Obama's visit to Hiroshima Friday will rekindle debate about the dropping of the first atomic bomb. More than a few people will wonder how the decision was reached. "No acceptable alternative" was the pronouncement of four eminent physicists in 1945 that made its way to the desk of Harry Truman. This scientific panel was composed of Enrico Fermi, Arthur Compton, Ernest Lawrence - all Nobel Prize winners - and, of course, J. Robert Oppenheimer.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is something deeply perverse about Manhattan , cable channel WGN's well-executed, edge-of-your-seat drama that returns for its second season at 9 p.m. Tuesday. Writer-producer Sam Shaw's series is an espionage thriller/domestic melodrama posing as historical epic. It's a fictionalized story of the scientists at Los Alamos, N.M., who developed the A-bomb during WWII. Manhattan is an overwrought, overripe piece of pulp fiction stuffed with overboiled intrigue.
TRAVEL
August 3, 2015 | By Si Liberman, For The Inquirer
HIROSHIMA, Japan - At 8:15 a.m. local time, on Thursday, Aug. 6, 1945, Little Boy exploded above that country's 10th-largest city, flattening it with the force of 15,000 tons of TNT. So dawned Day One of the Nuclear Age. Coming up on the 70th anniversary, we stood as tourists in Hiroshima, my wife and I, just yards from ground zero for the first atomic bomb - one of two ever to be used in warfare, with the second dropped three days later on Nagasaki....
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
THE CONTROVERSIAL parcel of land for which the Nutter administration wants to pay more than $7.2 million was once the site of a scrap-metal firm that dismantled a ship exposed to atomic-bomb tests in the Marshall Islands after World War II, the Daily News has learned. The USS Niagara, a wartime naval-transport ship, in July 1946 became a "target ship" in Operation Crossroads, in which the U.S. conducted atomic-bomb tests "using nuclear devices very similar to the one dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, in August 1945," according to a document obtained from the U.S. Defense Department's Defense Threat Reduction Agency.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dr. Rubby Sherr, 99, a Princeton University physics professor who helped develop the atomic bomb and witnessed its first test, died Monday, July 8, at the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford, where he lived since 1998. The test took place near Alamogordo, N.M., on July 16, 1945. The United States dropped the first atomic bomb in wartime, over Hiroshima, Japan, on Aug. 6, 1945. "His major contribution," son-in-law Robert Hess said, was "the portion of the device positioned at the center of the bomb, designed to spread the nuclear chain reaction rapidly throughout the fissile plutonium material.
TRAVEL
August 14, 2011 | By Blair Kamin, Chicago Tribune
OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The poster's hush-hush tone said it all: "What you see here, what you do here, what you hear here, when you leave here, let it stay here. " Here in the rolling hills of eastern Tennessee, America built one of three secret cities that developed the atomic bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, leading to Japan's surrender on Aug. 14, 1945, and bringing an end to World War II. The city, now called Oak Ridge, once was home to 75,000 people, yet it did not appear on any map. Visitors could get into the town only through gated entrances.
SPORTS
June 4, 2010 | By Kate Fagan, Inquirer Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Goalkeepers seem to enjoy a new soccer ball about as much as they enjoy defending a penalty kick. A new ball is always too light, too unpredictable, the wrong color, and what was the problem with the old one, anyway? This summer's latest edition - the Jabulani, created by Adidas for the 2010 FIFA World Cup - has recently been called all sorts of bad names by the stars preparing to use it. The most contemptuous review came from Brazilian goalkeeper Julio Cesar, who told the press: "It's terrible, horrible.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Harrison Ford may be 65, but not to worry - it's clear in "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" that his stuntman is only 25. In the first few minutes alone, Indy dodges a thousand bullets, swings from the rafters via his famous rawhide whip, and outruns the shock wave from an atom bomb. The year is 1957, the bomb is a military test in New Mexico, and none of this is by happenstance. Steven Spielberg has come to praise Indiana Jones and also to bury him, and so he positions Indy's swan song in the mid-1950s - the moment when the United States made the pivot from a nation that built its mythology around a heroic past to a nation whose atomic age imagination was fixed on the future.
NEWS
February 17, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Francis E. Low, 85, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology physicist and provost whose life included work on the atomic bomb, a passion for music, and a stint as an Army mule driver, died of heart failure yesterday at the Quadrangle, a retirement community in Haverford. As provost from 1980 to 1985, Dr. Low established a viable role for the humanities at MIT, his daughter Margaret Low Smith said. He encouraged liberal arts courses for the engineering, mathematics and science students, she said, and believed physicists could also be philosophers.
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