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Atrial Fibrillation

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LIVING
March 6, 2000 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER SUBURBAN WRITER
About five years ago, I noticed an occasional few moments of breathlessness after climbing a flight of stairs. I shrugged it off, mostly because I was physically fit. I bike, swim and walk - last October in Ireland, I walked 26.2 miles in seven hours in the Dublin Marathon, after training six days a week for four months, a total of 700 miles. Eight weeks ago, two days after my 60th birthday, I finally checked out the condition with a doctor. I expected to be told nothing was wrong.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer David Hess of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article
"Atrial fibrillation," the term used to describe the medical problem that sent President Bush to the hospital yesterday, sounds much more frightening than it is, at least in a person with no underlying heart disease. Atrial fibrillation is an abnormally fast and chaotic beating of one or both of the upper, or atrial, chambers of the heart. It usually stops on its own or, if it does not, can be effectively treated with a variety of drugs and methods. In any case, it is unlikely to damage the heart or brain.
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three stories of life on blood-thinning medication: Matthew Klug of Avon-by-the-Sea, N.J., cut back on his beloved pastime of surfing when his doctor warned that if he hit his head, he could suffer internal bleeding. Paul Cirielli of Montvale, N.J., stopped woodworking, leery of the sharp tools, and he also carries around a packet of special powder that can be applied to bad cuts to stanch the flow of blood. And Arlene Geise of Miami has stopped taking blood thinners after a bout of severe gastrointestinal bleeding sent her to the hospital.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush yesterday started taking blood-thinning medicine to reduce the chance of a stroke, after suffering another bout of irregular heartbeat, White House officials said. Bush underwent more tests to determine the cause of a thyroid condition that doctors believe is the easily treatable cause of his heart problem. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater revealed that on Tuesday evening, for the fourth day in a row, Bush's heart beat irregularly. This lasted for only a few moments.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | Marc Schogol from reports from Inquirer wire services
CHOLESTEROL AND CANCER There's bad news about "good cholesterol. " Researchers say there is evidence linking the fatty substance in blood, thought to protect against heart disease, to an increased risk of breast cancer. If the evidence reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute is upheld in later studies, the new finding would mean women would be damned if they do and damned if they don't when it comes to their levels of good cholesterol - also known as high- density lipoprotein or HDL. ASPIRIN AND STROKES If you suffer from the heart ailment known as atrial fibrillation, both ordinary aspirin and a blood-thinning drug known as warfarin are effective in preventing strokes.
SPORTS
December 4, 1995 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
What prevented Derrick Coleman from playing for the New Jersey Nets before he was traded to the 76ers last week? The term is atrial fibrillation, a relatively common heart condition, not life-threatening and generally easily treatable. Two cardiologists at teaching universities in the area explained the condition this way: The heart has four chambers, two atria, two ventricle. Blood from above and below the chest flows through the right atrium to the right ventricle. That sends the blood to the lungs, where it picks up oxygen, then returns through the left atrium and left ventricle, delivering oxygenated blood to the body.
SPORTS
September 1, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Larry Bird reveals in an upcoming book that he has a heart problem, one that surfaced occasionally in the offseason while he was with the Celtics and still requires medication. In an interview with the Boston Globe yesterday, Bird declined to talk about the condition, but indicated this would be his last season as head coach of the Indiana Pacers. The heart condition, known as atrial fibrillation, is controllable with medication, proper attention to diet, exercise, and moderated alcohol consumption, Celtics team physician Arnold Scheller said.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | Daily News wire services
NEW YORK Tickle thyself? Brain says not Why is it so hard to tickle yourself? Because one part of the brain tells another: "It's just you. Don't get excited," say researchers who watched the brains of people trying to tickle themselves. The killjoy is the cerebellum, found in the lower back of the brain, the researchers suggest. The brain is already known to predict what a person will feel when his or her body does something. That way, it can ignore expected sensations like pressure on the soles of the feet while walking, and save its attention for more important things, like the feeling of a foot bumping a stone.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The electric-shock treatment that President Bush may undergo today to return his heartbeat to a normal rate is described by doctors as a common procedure that entails little risk to his health. "If the drug treatment he is undergoing doesn't work," said George Bren of George Washington University Hospital, "he'll get the shock to reset the electrical activity in his heart. That will allow his heartbeat to start over again from scratch. " Cynthia Tracy, a Georgetown University Hospital heart specialist, said the procedure involved "very, very little risk" and was commonly used to correct the ailment, called atrial fibrillation, that Bush suffers.
NEWS
December 8, 2004 | By Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After a delay of more than a year, the Food and Drug Administration has approved publication of new patient warnings for a potentially risky heart drug that millions of Americans are taking. Patients taking the drug, amiodarone, can read the new warnings online at www.wyeth.com beginning next week and will soon start receiving paper copies when they get or refill prescriptions. Amiodarone, also sold under the brand names Cordarone and Pacerone, has numerous serious and fatal side effects, including lung toxicity, thyroid problems and liver damage.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three stories of life on blood-thinning medication: Matthew Klug of Avon-by-the-Sea, N.J., cut back on his beloved pastime of surfing when his doctor warned that if he hit his head, he could suffer internal bleeding. Paul Cirielli of Montvale, N.J., stopped woodworking, leery of the sharp tools, and he also carries around a packet of special powder that can be applied to bad cuts to stanch the flow of blood. And Arlene Geise of Miami has stopped taking blood thinners after a bout of severe gastrointestinal bleeding sent her to the hospital.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women, racial minorities, and people over 75 are underrepresented in the clinical trials that help determine the way all cardiac patients are treated, a study from Lankenau Medical Center researchers has found. This means that the recommendations that doctors use to treat heart problems may not be the best for all groups, said senior author Peter Kowey, head of Cardiology for Main Line Health. A team at Lankenau Heart Institute and Lankenau Institute for Medical Research laid out the disparities in a research letter published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
September 28, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joshua M. Cooper inserted a catheter through a vein in Janice McKemey's groin, up through her abdomen and all the way inside her heart. From there, the Temple University Hospital physician pushed the slender device through a wall of tissue into the left atrium, where the hard part began. Cooper's delicate task: detect heart cells that had gone rogue and destroy them. Called catheter ablation, the procedure has been around for decades, and with advances in technology it has become quite safe, especially in the hands of a skilled practitioner.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
Geno Merli figures it's about 10 or 15 minutes into the conventional medical school lecture when the cellphones and iPads come out and the texting and Web-surfing start. "They're doing something else while they're listening," says Merli, an internist and codirector of the Vascular Center at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. It's not that different at medical conventions, he says, which was why the people who run the annual American College of Physicians (ACP) meeting came to Merli and fellow lecturer Howard Weitz seven years ago and said, almost pleadingly, "Be innovative.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: My doctor recently had me get an echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart). After the technician took it, he said that I'm good for "10,000 miles" and there are no blockages. Now, my doctor is having me take the blood thinner Coumadin. I'm black and blue from it! When I asked why I need to take it, he said it's to keep my tubes from clogging up. I have no problems with my health. I'm 86 years old, have never been in a hospital except to have my three sons and a knee replacement.
NEWS
March 17, 2011 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eric Siegel is the kind of guy who can spend 45 minutes deciding which golf club to buy. So it's not surprising that he'd want to know everything he could about atrial fibrillation, the irregular heartbeat that puts him at risk of stroke and more serious heart problems. Every morning, the 54-year-old Bryn Mawr business-strategy consultant gets a Google alert tipping him to any new published material about his condition, which affects more than 2 million Americans. He's been heartened to see how much research energy is being devoted to this vexing heart problem.
NEWS
January 27, 2010 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For selected patients with an increasingly common heart-rhythm disorder, destroying the heart's faulty electrical pathways is far more effective than drugs, an international study shows. The disorder, atrial fibrillation, is an irregular, fast heartbeat that causes palpitations, breathlessness, and fatigue. It raises the risk of stroke, heart failure, and sudden death. Anti-arrhythmic drugs are the first line of treatment, but they don't always work, or stop working, and have many side effects.
SPORTS
December 9, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Penguins owner-captain Mario Lemieux, whose career has included an uncommon sequence of medical misfortune, was released yesterday from a Pittsburgh hospital after being admitted fewer than 24 hours before with a rapid heartbeat. The condition, known as atrial fibrillation, is commonly treated with medication and is not expected to end his career or alter his life. Lemieux, 40, could be working out again within a week, after doctors determine how much medication he needs, and he could return to the ice not longer after that.
SPORTS
October 2, 2005 | By Tim Panaccio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On a night when Peter Forsberg finally made his Flyers' preseason debut, Mike Knuble was resting comfortably in Philadelphia awaiting a stress test tomorrow to rule out serious heart trouble. According to the 33-year-old winger, a large Diet Coke triggered an erratic heartbeat and palpitations during the first period of Friday's game against the Devils. The condition is known as atrial fibrillation, said trainer Jim McCrossin. "I don't drink coffee, but I do drink 20 ounces of Diet Coke before every game and I think that triggered it," Knuble said yesterday morning, when he was medically cleared - pending the stress test - of any serious cardiological problems.
NEWS
December 8, 2004 | By Alison Young INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
After a delay of more than a year, the Food and Drug Administration has approved publication of new patient warnings for a potentially risky heart drug that millions of Americans are taking. Patients taking the drug, amiodarone, can read the new warnings online at www.wyeth.com beginning next week and will soon start receiving paper copies when they get or refill prescriptions. Amiodarone, also sold under the brand names Cordarone and Pacerone, has numerous serious and fatal side effects, including lung toxicity, thyroid problems and liver damage.
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