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NEWS
October 26, 2010 | By Larry King, Tom Infield, Cynthia Burton, and Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Staff Writers
Turn on your TV, fellow voter. Look, there's dastardly Dan Onorato, who seemingly has turned thousands of Pittsburghers into unemployed zombies. And dirty Jon Runyan, who appears to help fist-shaking foreigners in their oil fields by opposing clean-energy jobs in New Jersey. And that shifty Mike Fitzpatrick, who allegedly pulled a midnight deal in Harrisburg just so he could keep raising Bucks County property taxes - all while stuffing an extra $20,000 into his own pockets.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
WASHINGTON - Already, both sides in the presidential race have loosed the electronic dogs of war. On TV sets in Pennsylvania and other battleground states, it already looks like the first week of October, as the candidates and free-spending super-PACs working on their behalf launch attacks and counterattacks unprecedented in size, cost, and negativity for so early in the campaign. The strategic aim, of course, is to define your opponent before he can define himself, to begin hardening unflattering perceptions that can be reinforced by the onslaught to come.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Julie Pace and David Espo, Associated Press
PUEBLO, Colo. - Mitt Romney and President Obama both deplored the pervasive presence of televised attack ads in the race for the White House on Thursday, though neither acknowledged being helped as well as harmed. Each blamed his foe. Romney went first, saying of the president's campaign, "They just blast ahead" with ads that have been judged false by independent fact checkers. "I don't know whatever happened to a campaign of 'hope and change,' " he said, a mocking reference to the spirit of optimism that Obama evoked during his successful run for the White House in 2008.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democratic heavyweights joined attorney general candidate Kathleen Kane on Monday in her attempt to beat back a series of negative campaign spots that one nonpartisan fact-checking group has described as "the most blatantly false attack ads of the political season. " Flanked by politicos such as former Gov. Ed Rendell and former Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham, Kane denied the ads' contention that she was soft on rape during her time as a prosecutor. She called on her Republican opponent, Cumberland County District Attorney David Freed, to denounce the spots.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | By Stephen Seplow, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
American voters have been telling pollsters for years that they disapprove of negative campaigning, and then - like addicts unable to control a stupid habit - electing those who practice it. But this year, the candidates are behaving as though voters have gotten serious about breaking the habit. Or at least controlling it. It's not that voters, particularly those in South Carolina, haven't seen a few million dollars worth of negative ads. It's that the majority of ads have not been negative, and when they are, they usually come couched as something else - from setting the record straight to comparing records to making sure everyone understands the treachery of the other guy's negative ads. "This is an environment where people are reasonably happy and not as angry as five years ago," said Andrew Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center in Washington, which does frequent polling about national attitudes.
NEWS
January 24, 2012 | By Steve Leblanc, Associated Press
BOSTON - Republican U.S. Sen. Scott Brown and his chief Democratic rival, Elizabeth Warren, have signed a pledge to curb political attack ads by outside groups in their Massachusetts Senate race. Under the terms of the deal, each campaign would agree to donate half the cost of any third-party ad to charity if that ad either supports their candidacy or attacks their opponent by name. At least one outside group that has targeted Warren immediately raised objections to the deal, while two outside groups that have targeted Brown said they were inclined to respect the deal, with one pledging to suspend its advertising.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
If you think that Marty Weinberg's TV ads about John Street are harsh, you should see what he's sending out in the mail. "Protect your family. Elect Marty Weinberg mayor. Not John Street!" says the full-color flier mailed to a number of Philadelphia homes yesterday, paid for by the Weinberg campaign. The flier, which highlights Weinberg's endorsement in the Democratic mayoral primary by the Fraternal Order of Police, features a picture of a bullet on the cover. "John Street would be a disaster when it comes to fighting crime," it says, accusing the former City Council president of backing legislation to give free drugs to addicts, voting to cut funding for abused children and voting against full disability pay for cops.
NEWS
August 16, 2001
While New Jersey takes the spotlight with one of only two governor's races nationwide this year, the election for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court shouldn't get lost in the dark. It's likely to be an expensive, special-interest slug-fest that taints well-qualified candidates and erodes respect for a court that doesn't have any respect to spare. If that happens, the election could be another example of why the state's highest judges should be appointed on merit. The usual drill is for judicial candidates to pass the tin cup to fellow lawyers, labor unions (usually pro-Democrat)
NEWS
April 24, 2007 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia mayoral campaign entered a combative and costly phase yesterday, as all five major candidates launched new television ads after a weekend debate peppered with attacks on the front-runner. Two of the ads - from State Rep. Dwight Evans and U.S. Rep. Bob Brady - take aim at the leader in the polls, businessman Tom Knox, who is running as an outsider bent on stopping City Hall corruption. Those messages, in turn, prompted the Knox campaign to cue up a counterattack in an ad saying his rivals "ought to be ashamed" of their last-minute tactics.
NEWS
February 28, 1996 | By Steven Thomma, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Steve Forbes won Arizona and a shot at the label of "comeback kid" by abandoning attack ads and focusing his campaign on his status as an outsider and a detailed explanation of what he wants to do as president. The New Jersey magazine publisher, given up for politically dead after disappointing finishes in Iowa and New Hampshire, won Arizona by appealing to voters who want their candidate to have a clear vision of the future and voters who want a flat tax to replace the current federal tax system.
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NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrats' latest attack on a South Jersey Republican congressional candidate takes him to task for a legal dispute that pulled in his former insurance company - a year after he left it. The attack ad, produced by national Democrats, prompted a threat of a lawsuit Monday and a demand that it be pulled off TV. The campaign fight hinges on a television ad the Washington-based Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) began running on cable Sunday hammering Tom MacArthur, the Republican in a surprisingly close House race against Democrat Aimee Belgard.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | BY BRANDON BAILEY, San Jose Mercury News
ESCALATING one of tech's biggest rivalries, Microsoft Corp. is accusing Google Inc. of compromising the privacy of Gmail users - leveling the charge in an unusual, in-your-face ad campaign that it hopes will resonate with consumers even if some analysts call it alarmist and irresponsible. The public attacks - in print, television and billboard messages that warn consumers about the supposed dangers of being "Scroogled," or mistreated by Google - marks a strategic shift in a clash of Internet titans, under the guidance of a bare-knuckle political-campaign strategist.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathleen Kane holds a 20-point lead in her bid to become the first woman and first Democrat to be elected Pennsylvania's attorney general, according to the latest Inquirer Pennsylvania Poll. But with barely a week remaining before next Tuesday's vote, nearly half of those surveyed said neither Kane nor her Republican rival, David Freed, had made much of an impression yet. The new numbers come as both candidates have launched the first television ads of their fall race, hoping to overcome that name-recognition gap. "My guess is that each side takes their share of the undecided voters, but we will still have our first Democratic attorney general," predicted Jefrey Pollock, president of the Democratic firm Global Strategies Group, which helped conduct the bipartisan poll.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kathleen Kane holds a 20-point lead in her bid to become the first woman and first Democrat to be elected Pennsylvania's attorney general, according to the latest Inquirer Pennsylvania Poll. But with barely a week remaining before next Tuesday's vote, nearly half of those surveyed said neither Kane nor her Republican rival, David Freed, had made much of an impression yet. The new numbers come as both candidates have launched the first television ads of their fall race, hoping to overcome that name-recognition gap. "My guess is that each side takes their share of the undecided voters, but we will still have our first Democratic attorney general," predicted Jefrey Pollock, president of the Democratic firm Global Strategies Group, which helped conduct the bipartisan poll.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
With less than three weeks before Election Day, the two candidates vying to become Pennsylvania's top prosecutor continue to wage their campaign in relative obscurity. In fact, the most dynamic figure to emerge in the race is not even on the ballot. As Democrat Kathleen Kane and Republican David Freed grapple to fix themselves in voters' minds, both have seized upon the last man elected attorney general - Gov. Corbett - as a foil in defining their own personas. "It's hard to find that crack and get the attention span of voters," said Christopher Borick, a political scientist and pollster at Muhlenberg College.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democratic heavyweights joined attorney general candidate Kathleen Kane on Monday in her attempt to beat back a series of negative campaign spots that one nonpartisan fact-checking group has described as "the most blatantly false attack ads of the political season. " Flanked by politicos such as former Gov. Ed Rendell and former Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham, Kane denied the ads' contention that she was soft on rape during her time as a prosecutor. She called on her Republican opponent, Cumberland County District Attorney David Freed, to denounce the spots.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By Julie Pace and David Espo, Associated Press
PUEBLO, Colo. - Mitt Romney and President Obama both deplored the pervasive presence of televised attack ads in the race for the White House on Thursday, though neither acknowledged being helped as well as harmed. Each blamed his foe. Romney went first, saying of the president's campaign, "They just blast ahead" with ads that have been judged false by independent fact checkers. "I don't know whatever happened to a campaign of 'hope and change,' " he said, a mocking reference to the spirit of optimism that Obama evoked during his successful run for the White House in 2008.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Cory Booker must feel like the halfback who finally gets to play in the big game — and fumbles the football. But he will get other chances. The Newark mayor's inarticulate handling of a Meet the Press question Sunday about Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's prior career with the Bain Capital private equity firm was painful to watch, but not fatal. Since he was President Obama's surrogate, it was surprising that Booker seemed to defend Romney, saying he disagreed with Obama ads that appear to equate private equity firms with evil incarnate.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
WASHINGTON - Already, both sides in the presidential race have loosed the electronic dogs of war. On TV sets in Pennsylvania and other battleground states, it already looks like the first week of October, as the candidates and free-spending super-PACs working on their behalf launch attacks and counterattacks unprecedented in size, cost, and negativity for so early in the campaign. The strategic aim, of course, is to define your opponent before he can define himself, to begin hardening unflattering perceptions that can be reinforced by the onslaught to come.
NEWS
April 10, 2012
MITT ROMNEY's presidential campaign asked TV stations across Pennsylvania to pull an attack ad against rival Rick Santorum that was scheduled to begin running Monday, in light of the serious illness of Santorum's 3-year-old daughter. "We have done this out of deference to Sen. Santorum's decision to suspend his campaign for personal reasons," said Andrea Saul, press secretary for the Romney campaign. Santorum was planning private campaign meetings Monday but canceled them because his daughter Bella, who has the genetic disorder Trisomy 18, is hospitalized.
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