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Auditors

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NEWS
September 6, 1991 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials have blamed the financial crisis for a lot of things, but they can't use money as an excuse for dirty offices and hallways in the City Council wing at City Hall. Council is paying six janitors an estimated $157,000 a year, more than double the amount necessary for the space they are responsible for cleaning, according to a recent city controller's report. What's more, the auditors found, Council's janitorial staff is required to work just 5 1/2 hours a day despite being paid on a full-time basis.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2001 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil complaint yesterday, charging three auditors for the now-defunct Allegheny health system with participating in a "fraudulent scheme" to hide the hospital network's declining finances. William F. Buettner, Mark D. Kirstein and Amy S. Frazier were named by the SEC in the complaint filed in federal court in Philadelphia. The three were executives at Coopers & Lybrand - now PricewaterhouseCoopers - who served as the independent accountants for Allegheny as the health system spiraled into bankruptcy in 1997 and 1998.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. could save up to $169 million a year by making a raft of changes in its operations, according to an auditors' report released yesterday, and the utility largely agreed. The management audit, by the consulting firm of Ernst & Young, recommended 251 ways PE could save money. One of the largest areas for improvement: compensation - both pay and benefits - for management and rank and file. The auditors said PE's compensation was higher than industry averages.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Political watchers in Bensalem have grown impatient for a response to this question: Is the township's Board of Auditors going to surcharge former and current officials to pay for a $1.5 million jury award levied against the municipality last month? The government watchdog, Common Cause of Bensalem, put the question in a Dec. 20 letter to the auditors, a board with limited powers that formally meets once a year in early January. And since the letter, another question has emerged: Did the people it was sent to ever see it?
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Noel Mattiello, Special to The Inquirer
Professional auditors are examining Pennsbury's financial records for the first time this year, and the township supervisors expect to learn from the experience. "Since this is a first-time use, we want you to give us some guidance if we're remiss in anything," Supervisor George Asimos told James Powers, a representative of Maillie Falconiero Co., certified public accountants of West Chester, Monday night. Powers attended the supervisors' meeting to explain how his firm would handle the examination of last year's accounts and file the township's annual financial report required by the state.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1984, within a week after FBI agents searched the desks of auditors in the Philadelphia Revenue Department looking for evidence of longstanding corruption, one dishonest city employee knew what he had to do. Elvin Steinberg, a city revenue examiner for 18 years, met with FBI agent Steven Irons, confessed he'd taken about $35,000 in bribes, and fingered 14 other corrupt city auditors, 21 private accountants who had paid them bribes and 60...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Congressional auditors, citing a long history of mismanagement and financial fumbling at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, yesterday urged lawmakers to create stronger safeguards against continued laxity at the agency. Testifying before a House subcommittee, officials of the General Accounting Office said HUD's internal financial controls began "disintegrating" in 1974. That was long before the onset of various scandals in which former high- ranking HUD officers and politically connected developers and consultants won fat contracts and fees by bypassing regular channels and appealing to the agency's higher-ups.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Republican mayoral candidate Joseph M. Egan was president of the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., federal auditors twice accused the agency of overstating the number of jobs it had created, and of failing to urge companies here to hire poor and middle-income people. In 1986 and 1988, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development asked the Goode administration to suspend the economic-development programs run by PIDC until the problems cited by HUD auditors were corrected.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
After 42 years as Doylestown Township auditor, Joseph P. Hart was ready to call it quits in l989 when his term expired. Township officials told the lifelong resident that he should run again. But Hart said, "I'm 82 years old. I think I ought to step aside and let somebody else do it. " But nobody else ran for township auditor in the November election and 29 people cast write-in votes for Hart. "I didn't do anything," said Hart. "On election night they called and said, 'You got more than 10 votes so you're elected auditor.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Defense Department auditors have found routine overcharges by military contractors totalling almost $800 million, the New York Times reported today. Citing what it said was a confidential report by the Defense Department Inspector General's office, the newspaper said a review of $54.3 billion worth of contracts from 95 suppliers showed almost half were "overpriced. " The overcharges totaled $788.9 million, or 1.5 percent of the total value of the contracts audited, and represented 365 of 774 items, the report said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 24, 2016 | By Martha Woodall and Karen Langley, STAFF WRITERS
HARRISBURG - The state's largest cyber charter school paid millions of taxpayer dollars to a management company, an arts center, and other entities tied to the school's founder, according to Pennsylvania's fiscal watchdog, who called again for an overhaul of what he called the nation's worst charter law. Auditor General Eugene A. DePasquale on Thursday detailed what his office found in a sweeping performance audit of the Pennsylvania Cyber Charter...
NEWS
September 12, 2016
Auditor general a rare, untainted official Numerous state officials have been indicted, convicted, and imprisoned, or have resigned under the threat of criminal charges. Our state budget is balanced only on paper. Full privatization of alcohol and property-tax relief remain impossible. State pension funds are out of balance by as much as $65 billion. One department to be proud of is the Office of Auditor General, headed by Eugene DePasquale. Throughout his government service, DePasquale has been a man of honor, integrity, and an innovator - one who supported legislation that would provide a public benefit.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania has done a poor job informing local law enforcement agencies about new requirements to report the number of untested rape kits, the state auditor general said Wednesday. Eugene DePasquale said confusing information from the state Department of Health and other agencies may have contributed to incomplete reporting on a testing backlog that critics have said could stifle sex-assault investigations. "This inadequate communication contributed to a low participation rate by law enforcement agencies, which in turn caused an undercounting of kits awaiting testing," he said at a news conference.
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Grace Toohey, Staff Writer
When Pennsylvania's auditor general released a report last week highlighting what he called a lack of state oversight of millions of dollars in lease reimbursements for charter schools, his message wasn't exactly new. Some of the data cited by Auditor General Eugene DePasquale mirrored an identical warning he issued in 2013. But that was partly the point. Three years had passed, DePasquale said, and the state had done nothing to address the issue, possibly paving the way for millions of dollars in wasteful, if not improper, spending.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
By 2021, the Philadelphia School District will have a $600 million budget deficit, City Controller Alan Butkovitz said Wednesday - and he's asking Mayor Kenney to give his office more auditing authority over the district to "avoid fiscal calamity. " Under current rules, Butkovitz said, his office can review only the district's financial statements. He wants to be able to conduct performance reviews, and look more closely at how the district spends money and grants contracts. "We just need the authorization to cut through the red tape and inspect all of the pages in their books," the controller said in the statement.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's fiscal watchdog on Wednesday questioned millions of public dollars paid to charter school landlords and called for the state to monitor such lease payments more closely. At a Capitol news conference, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale highlighted more than $2.5 million in lease reimbursements to nine charter schools, including the Propel Charter School System in Allegheny County, the Chester Community Charter School in Delaware County, and School Lane Charter School in Bucks County.
NEWS
July 27, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - State examiners will launch a fresh look at the pension systems that manage about $78 billion in assets for hundreds of thousands of public employees and retirees, the state's top auditor said Monday. Auditor General Eugene DePasquale told reporters that he is particularly interested in fees paid to outside investment managers. "We're paying them a lot of money," DePasquale said in a conference call. "What are we getting in return?" He announced the planned audits days after federal prosecutors filed false-statement charges against former state Treasurer Barbara Hafer and fraud counts against a Philadelphia-area businessman, Richard Ireland, over contracts he arranged for the management of state money.
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Emily Babay, Staff Writer
THE PENNSYLVANIA Department of Revenue says it is contacting hundreds of taxpayers whose personal information was on a laptop that was stolen last month. The computer was stolen in late June when department auditors were in San Francisco to conduct a routine audit. Someone smashed the windows of the auditors' rental vehicle and took four laptops, which have not been recovered, the department said. The data on one of the computers may not have been secure, the department said, meaning personal information from some taxpayers may have been compromised.
NEWS
May 14, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania school districts may be spending millions too much on busing, the state auditor general said Tuesday. Examinations by his office found 19 school districts in 11 counties paid a total of $54.8 million more for transportation during select periods between 2004 and 2014 than what the state determined was the maximum amount it would consider for the calculation of reimbursements, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said. Only one of those districts had competitively bid transportation services during the audit periods, according to DePasquale.
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