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NEWS
September 6, 1991 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
City officials have blamed the financial crisis for a lot of things, but they can't use money as an excuse for dirty offices and hallways in the City Council wing at City Hall. Council is paying six janitors an estimated $157,000 a year, more than double the amount necessary for the space they are responsible for cleaning, according to a recent city controller's report. What's more, the auditors found, Council's janitorial staff is required to work just 5 1/2 hours a day despite being paid on a full-time basis.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2001 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil complaint yesterday, charging three auditors for the now-defunct Allegheny health system with participating in a "fraudulent scheme" to hide the hospital network's declining finances. William F. Buettner, Mark D. Kirstein and Amy S. Frazier were named by the SEC in the complaint filed in federal court in Philadelphia. The three were executives at Coopers & Lybrand - now PricewaterhouseCoopers - who served as the independent accountants for Allegheny as the health system spiraled into bankruptcy in 1997 and 1998.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1991 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. could save up to $169 million a year by making a raft of changes in its operations, according to an auditors' report released yesterday, and the utility largely agreed. The management audit, by the consulting firm of Ernst & Young, recommended 251 ways PE could save money. One of the largest areas for improvement: compensation - both pay and benefits - for management and rank and file. The auditors said PE's compensation was higher than industry averages.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Political watchers in Bensalem have grown impatient for a response to this question: Is the township's Board of Auditors going to surcharge former and current officials to pay for a $1.5 million jury award levied against the municipality last month? The government watchdog, Common Cause of Bensalem, put the question in a Dec. 20 letter to the auditors, a board with limited powers that formally meets once a year in early January. And since the letter, another question has emerged: Did the people it was sent to ever see it?
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Noel Mattiello, Special to The Inquirer
Professional auditors are examining Pennsbury's financial records for the first time this year, and the township supervisors expect to learn from the experience. "Since this is a first-time use, we want you to give us some guidance if we're remiss in anything," Supervisor George Asimos told James Powers, a representative of Maillie Falconiero Co., certified public accountants of West Chester, Monday night. Powers attended the supervisors' meeting to explain how his firm would handle the examination of last year's accounts and file the township's annual financial report required by the state.
NEWS
June 14, 1986 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1984, within a week after FBI agents searched the desks of auditors in the Philadelphia Revenue Department looking for evidence of longstanding corruption, one dishonest city employee knew what he had to do. Elvin Steinberg, a city revenue examiner for 18 years, met with FBI agent Steven Irons, confessed he'd taken about $35,000 in bribes, and fingered 14 other corrupt city auditors, 21 private accountants who had paid them bribes and 60...
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Congressional auditors, citing a long history of mismanagement and financial fumbling at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, yesterday urged lawmakers to create stronger safeguards against continued laxity at the agency. Testifying before a House subcommittee, officials of the General Accounting Office said HUD's internal financial controls began "disintegrating" in 1974. That was long before the onset of various scandals in which former high- ranking HUD officers and politically connected developers and consultants won fat contracts and fees by bypassing regular channels and appealing to the agency's higher-ups.
NEWS
September 1, 1991 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Republican mayoral candidate Joseph M. Egan was president of the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp., federal auditors twice accused the agency of overstating the number of jobs it had created, and of failing to urge companies here to hire poor and middle-income people. In 1986 and 1988, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development asked the Goode administration to suspend the economic-development programs run by PIDC until the problems cited by HUD auditors were corrected.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, Special to The Inquirer
After 42 years as Doylestown Township auditor, Joseph P. Hart was ready to call it quits in l989 when his term expired. Township officials told the lifelong resident that he should run again. But Hart said, "I'm 82 years old. I think I ought to step aside and let somebody else do it. " But nobody else ran for township auditor in the November election and 29 people cast write-in votes for Hart. "I didn't do anything," said Hart. "On election night they called and said, 'You got more than 10 votes so you're elected auditor.
NEWS
August 9, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Defense Department auditors have found routine overcharges by military contractors totalling almost $800 million, the New York Times reported today. Citing what it said was a confidential report by the Defense Department Inspector General's office, the newspaper said a review of $54.3 billion worth of contracts from 95 suppliers showed almost half were "overpriced. " The overcharges totaled $788.9 million, or 1.5 percent of the total value of the contracts audited, and represented 365 of 774 items, the report said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the 1980s into the 2000s, Samuel Erlick spoke about his World War II experiences to students at high schools in South Jersey. "He was invited to do that," and brought not only his medals, but a map so the students could follow where he had served, his wife, Sandra, said. Through his own experiences, she said, he hoped "to give them a history of World War II. " On Monday, Feb. 2, Mr. Erlick, 90, of Cherry Hill, who retired in January 1994 as an auditor for the Philadelphia regional office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, died at Voorhees Care & Rehabilitation Center.
NEWS
January 31, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey's decision to invest $15 million with a venture-capital firm tied to Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker did not violate pay-to-play laws, even though Baker contributed $10,000 to the New Jersey GOP months earlier, the state Treasury Department's chief auditor said in a report released Thursday. The department released the report, dated Nov. 20, after a daylong meeting of the State Investment Council, which oversees the management of the $82 billion pension fund for public workers.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometime Tuesday, when his successor is inaugurated in Harrisburg, James F. Cawley, 45, now Pennsylvania's lieutenant governor, will be unemployed - the first time he's ever been fired - voted out of office Nov. 4. "It was an interesting situation," he said. "When I woke up on the morning of Nov. 5, I kind of said to myself, 'OK, now what?' It was exciting, but also a little scary. " Cawley didn't have to wonder long. On Jan. 13, he was tapped to head the United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey, one of the area's largest nonprofits, with annual revenue of $67.9 million.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Saddled with escalating debt and declining enrollment, Cheyney University - the nation's first college for black people - is in dire straits that will worsen unless the state takes "drastic action" to rescue the school, the state auditor general said Wednesday. The school's expenses exceeded its revenue in four of the last five years, and its deficit, already $12 million, will grow by an additional $5 million this academic year, Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said in a report.
NEWS
October 4, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said Thursday that he was initiating another audit of the state Department of Education to review oversight of contractors and consultants, including a former adviser to Gov. Corbett who allegedly was a "ghost" employee. Ron Tomalis resigned his $140,000-a-year job as a higher-education adviser to Corbett in August amid accusations that he had done little to earn the money, but DePasquale said the controversy "was not the only factor in the undertaking of the audit," his second of the department.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local Veterans Affairs employees were told to falsify appointment dates to "game" the system, a VA audit has found, raising fresh questions about officials' denials that staffers schemed to hide delays in responding to veterans. At the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, nearly a third of schedulers interviewed by auditors this spring said they had been instructed not to enter the actual appointment dates veterans had requested, but instead log different dates. Similar manipulations were encouraged at the clinic in Horsham, auditors found.
NEWS
May 24, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Incomplete, inaccurate, or nonexistent data on privately contracted demolitions suggest that the city is not any safer than it was on June 5, when the collapse of a Center City building being razed resulted in the deaths of six people, the City Controller's Office announced Thursday. In a 31-page audit of the Department of Licenses and Inspections, Controller Alan Butkovitz slammed the agency for what he described as an ongoing "culture of informality" that "jeopardizes public safety.
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oversight of charter schools in Pennsylvania is "a mess," state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale has concluded, based on a series of public meetings across the commonwealth. To help clean it up, DePasquale called Monday for creating an independent charter oversight board, restoring charter reimbursements for school districts, and requiring the state to pick up the tab for cyber charter schools. DePasquale, a Democrat, said taxpayer-funded charter schools, which enroll 120,000 students across the state, are here to stay.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA State Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said Thursday his office had begun an audit of the Philadelphia School District to examine finances, school safety, academics, and the impact the loss of state charter-school reimbursement funds had on the district's bottom line. Superintendent William R. Hite Jr., who joined DePasquale for the announcement at district headquarters, said he welcomed the review. "When you are challenged financially, like we are, obviously, here," Hite said, "it is extremely important to get as much information from independent third parties as possible about how effectively we are able to use the funds we have at our disposal.
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