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Audrey Ii

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NEWS
August 22, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The version of Little Shop of Horrors at Bucks County Playhouse proves that this funny, funky little musical of delights is a show to be savored, even if the production is not as piquant a theatrical repast as one might hope. It is a meal in which some of the ingredients are not quite right, although the service, in general, is satisfactory enough. Eating, of course, is what Little Shop of Horrors is all about. The hungry character is Audrey II, a person-eating plant, that during the course of the show grows from a cute little pod in a pot to an imposing, demanding maw with an insatiable appetite for human flesh.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What we're talking about here is world conquest. Bop-shi-bop. World conquest of the most insidious sort. Bop-shi-bop. You say the subject isn't being taken seriously enough? After all, world conquest, especially the insidious variety, is no laughing matter. Ordinarily this would be true, but this view does not take into consideration a film/Broadway/film project called Little Shop of Horrors, where laughter is the whole point. You start out with this itsy-bitsy plant.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of Little Shop of Horrors is affectionate and fun, and you and I both know why. No, the show doesn't have any of its contemporaries' trademarks: not Sondheim's sophisticated lyricism, Webber's puffed-up self-importance, Kander and Ebb's slickness, or Ahrens and Flaherty's jaunty appeal. Nonetheless, it's a closet favorite in the hearts of several recent generations of musical-theater lovers. Maybe you first saw or performed it onstage as a kid, watched the Frank Oz-directed film featuring Rick Moranis and Steve Martin, or caught the Roger Corman original and spotted a young Jack Nicholson.
NEWS
March 17, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Audrey is back in town, and boy, is he ever in full bloom. Well, I guess he is the right pronoun. I'm no expert on sexing plants, but since this one has a man's voice and exhibits aggressively voracious behavior typically associated with males, he seems to fit better than the alternative. By now you may have guessed who (what?) is under discussion. You'll have recalled that Audrey is the name of the man-eating plant that is the central character of Little Shop of Horrors. The current touring version of the Broadway revival of the musical comedy is at the Merriam Theater through Sunday.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By RENEE V. LUCAS, Daily News Staff Writer
All right, I'll admit it. By the time the stage production of "Little Shop of Horrors" opened last night at the Theatre of the Living Arts, I had seen the movie. Twice. I knew the idiosyncrasies of each character. I knew all the great lines. I knew when it was time to laugh. I had also bought the soundtrack album, and could go note for note on every solo - including the plant's. (OK, you wrenched it out of me . . . I'd even played the album as late as last night.) So when I got to the theater, I was in a Clint Eastwood frame of mind.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The end is nigh. Audrey II is back in town, looking meaner, hungrier and stronger than before. The feeding has begun at the Theater of the Living Arts on South Street, and there is no telling where it will end. Center City, of course, will go first. But no neighborhood is safe, not Fishtown, not Mount Airy, not even Chestnut Hill. Sooner or later, they will all disappear into the giant red maw of Audrey II and they will go laughing because the production of The Little Shop of Horrors that opened last night is irresistible fun. Another version had a six-week run three years ago at the Shubert Theater, but it did not have the necessary blood thirst.
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That mean, man-eating plant called Audrey II has been repotted, and the entire show she's in, Little Shop of Horrors, has been transplanted. Like all plants, now that she's in new soil, Audrey II is growing a little differently. This Little Shop opened in Norristown, and after a break the coproduction between Theater Horizon and 11th Hour Theater Company - a cross-pollination, they're calling it - has moved to Center City. It's got a new leading lady, the perky Melinda Bass, who replaced Maggie Lakis after Lakis was tapped for the Off-Broadway production of Avenue Q. The show's character now blooms in a different way. At Norristown, Theatre Horizon's turf, it was a dark Little Shop, rich and distinctive because the musical is usually played as a cartoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Someone has been dragging sacks of Miracle-Gro into the Little Shop of Horrors - enough to sprout two different regional productions of the funny, bloodthirsty stage musical about a rampant plant. The first, a nice rendition underscoring the show's comic-book sensibility, opened Thursday at the Devon Theater on Frankford Avenue in the Northeast - the beginning of that theater's first full season, in a renovated movie house restored to neighborhood-landmark status. The second, a coproduction from Theater Horizon and 11th Hour Theatre Company, opens at Centre Theater in Norristown this week.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 17-year-old actress looked sleek and elegant up on the stage earlier this week as she prepared to slip into her costume - a life-sized plant named "Audrey II. " Once she crawled into the monstrosity, however, she was anything but elegant. "Ow!" came Lindsay Taylor's barely audible voice from deep inside the costume as she shuffled backward to her seat on the stage. "I just slammed my foot down on the edge of the pot. " Taylor is part of the Highland Underground Players, an acting troupe from the regional high school, which will be performing the musical, Little Shop of Horrors, next weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1986 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Little Shop of Horrors," a musical starring Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene, Vincent Gardenia and Steve Martin. Directed by Frank Oz. Screenplay and lyrics by Howard Ashman. Music by Alan Menken. Running time: 89 minutes. A Warner Brothers release. At area theaters. Trivia question: Before "Little Shop of Horrors," what was the only movie based on a stage musical that itself was based on a non-musical movie? (Answer at the end of this review. Anyone able to come up with another example gets the most trivial prize I can think of - a prepublication copy of Vanna White's upcoming memoirs.
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NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Bristol Riverside Theatre's production of Little Shop of Horrors is affectionate and fun, and you and I both know why. No, the show doesn't have any of its contemporaries' trademarks: not Sondheim's sophisticated lyricism, Webber's puffed-up self-importance, Kander and Ebb's slickness, or Ahrens and Flaherty's jaunty appeal. Nonetheless, it's a closet favorite in the hearts of several recent generations of musical-theater lovers. Maybe you first saw or performed it onstage as a kid, watched the Frank Oz-directed film featuring Rick Moranis and Steve Martin, or caught the Roger Corman original and spotted a young Jack Nicholson.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is absolutely no scientific evidence that teenage boys are crazy about carnivorous plants. Even so, Brandon Huber - at 23, not that many years beyond adolescence - swears it's true. "Guys at that age, they want to grow plants but they want to grow cool plants. You certainly don't want to be known as a gardener growing flowers," he says, faking horror over those last three words. There's also Mike Kratz, general manager of Rhoads Garden Nursery in North Wales, who's noticed the teenage boys lusting after these botanical oddities - and has his own experience to draw on: "Having been one of those [teenage boys]
NEWS
December 8, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That mean, man-eating plant called Audrey II has been repotted, and the entire show she's in, Little Shop of Horrors, has been transplanted. Like all plants, now that she's in new soil, Audrey II is growing a little differently. This Little Shop opened in Norristown, and after a break the coproduction between Theater Horizon and 11th Hour Theater Company - a cross-pollination, they're calling it - has moved to Center City. It's got a new leading lady, the perky Melinda Bass, who replaced Maggie Lakis after Lakis was tapped for the Off-Broadway production of Avenue Q. The show's character now blooms in a different way. At Norristown, Theatre Horizon's turf, it was a dark Little Shop, rich and distinctive because the musical is usually played as a cartoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Feed me! That's what the bloodthirsty, other-worldly plant named Audrey II implores, then demands, in Little Shop of Horrors. Well, she got what she asked for. Two of the region's smaller professional stage companies - Theatre Horizon and 11th Hour Theatre Company - have banded together to produce the musical, and they've not only heartily fed the maniacal plant, they've re-seeded and carefully tended the show itself. Their gleefully sassy production puts a fine point on every caricature it draws and treats each song by Howard Ashman and Alan Menken like a show-stopper.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Someone has been dragging sacks of Miracle-Gro into the Little Shop of Horrors - enough to sprout two different regional productions of the funny, bloodthirsty stage musical about a rampant plant. The first, a nice rendition underscoring the show's comic-book sensibility, opened Thursday at the Devon Theater on Frankford Avenue in the Northeast - the beginning of that theater's first full season, in a renovated movie house restored to neighborhood-landmark status. The second, a coproduction from Theater Horizon and 11th Hour Theatre Company, opens at Centre Theater in Norristown this week.
NEWS
March 17, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Audrey is back in town, and boy, is he ever in full bloom. Well, I guess he is the right pronoun. I'm no expert on sexing plants, but since this one has a man's voice and exhibits aggressively voracious behavior typically associated with males, he seems to fit better than the alternative. By now you may have guessed who (what?) is under discussion. You'll have recalled that Audrey is the name of the man-eating plant that is the central character of Little Shop of Horrors. The current touring version of the Broadway revival of the musical comedy is at the Merriam Theater through Sunday.
NEWS
July 4, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 17-year-old actress looked sleek and elegant up on the stage earlier this week as she prepared to slip into her costume - a life-sized plant named "Audrey II. " Once she crawled into the monstrosity, however, she was anything but elegant. "Ow!" came Lindsay Taylor's barely audible voice from deep inside the costume as she shuffled backward to her seat on the stage. "I just slammed my foot down on the edge of the pot. " Taylor is part of the Highland Underground Players, an acting troupe from the regional high school, which will be performing the musical, Little Shop of Horrors, next weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What we're talking about here is world conquest. Bop-shi-bop. World conquest of the most insidious sort. Bop-shi-bop. You say the subject isn't being taken seriously enough? After all, world conquest, especially the insidious variety, is no laughing matter. Ordinarily this would be true, but this view does not take into consideration a film/Broadway/film project called Little Shop of Horrors, where laughter is the whole point. You start out with this itsy-bitsy plant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
The Lord of the Rings, the holiday show that arrived at the Annenberg Center yesterday, is puppet theater but puppet theater on a production scale seen today mostly in Broadway musicals - and perhaps in some of the hi-tech illusions at Disneyland. The musical adaptation of the J.R.R. Tolkien fantasy about questing Hobbits is unsparingly spectacular in the production from Montreal's Theatre sans Fil (Theater Without String). Creatures of ghastly forms and shapes materialize - a giant red man-eating spider; an enormous fat hand with four fingers grasping hungrily in all directions like the monster plant, Audrey II, in Little Shop of Horrors; squads of warriors with stoplight eyes doing battle with flashlight-eyed enemies; a tree with eyes and a protective nature.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The version of Little Shop of Horrors at Bucks County Playhouse proves that this funny, funky little musical of delights is a show to be savored, even if the production is not as piquant a theatrical repast as one might hope. It is a meal in which some of the ingredients are not quite right, although the service, in general, is satisfactory enough. Eating, of course, is what Little Shop of Horrors is all about. The hungry character is Audrey II, a person-eating plant, that during the course of the show grows from a cute little pod in a pot to an imposing, demanding maw with an insatiable appetite for human flesh.
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