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Audubon Park

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NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
If you live in Audubon Park, your neighbors are probably "the people you grew up with," says Mary Stokes, who moved there with her parents in 1941. Stokes is 74 now, and she and other residents love the villagelike coziness of this unusual Camden County municipality. Audubon Park is a single square mile between Nicholson Road, the Black Horse Pike, and Peter's Creek. It has no stores, schools, or churches, and the real estate is collective property. "There were supposed to be Audubon Parks all over America," says Kristin M. Szylvian, whose book The Mutual Housing Experiment - New Deal Communities for the Urban Middle Class was published in July by Temple University Press.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | By Jane Lenel, Special to The Inquirer
The Audubon Park Council decided this week to delay renting the borough's new multipurpose building to Archway Systems for use as a daytime activity center for medically handicapped senior citizens until bids are received for construction of a small addition to the building. The 15-by-35-foot addition, which would provide space for a nursing station, office and storage, is required by state law for the facility's proposed use. At a meeting Monday, the council voted 3-2 to delay Archway's occupancy to be sure that construction bids do not exceed the established $30,000 budget for the project, said Mayor William Cullen.
NEWS
September 5, 2010
An Audubon Park woman was arrested Saturday and charged with murder after her boyfriend was fatally stabbed at her home, police said. Paige Pfefferle, 19, who lives in the first block of Pelican Court, is accused of stabbing Matthew Hus, 21, of Audubon, about 2 a.m. during an argument, authorities said. Hus was pronounced dead at 4 a.m. at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden. - Chelsea Conaboy
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
Walk down Pelican Drive in Audubon Park, and you'll hear tell of a flap about birds. Look around, and you'll see why. Jean and Bob DuCoin have a penchant for feeding fowl - particularly pigeons, which leave their calling cards on car hoods, rooftops and the street. And the neighbors are squawking. Citing health hazards, the local housing corporation asked the DuCoins in a letter three weeks ago to stop feeding the birds. "It sounds like a stupid problem, doesn't it," Jean DuCoin said.
NEWS
April 3, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
The Audubon Park Board of Education unanimously approved a $581,235 budget at a public hearing Tuesday. The budget represents a decrease in spending of $24,765. The budget reduces the school debt owed by property owners from $119,000 to $68,000, meaning that the annual payment per household would drop from $238 a year to $135. Audubon Park is owned by an association of homeowners and does not levy taxes to support the school budget. Instead, the portion not covered by federal or state aid is divided evenly among the borough's 499 homes.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Lewis R. Sipple, 83, Audubon Park's first paid police chief, died Monday at West Jersey Hospital-Voorhees. An Audubon Park resident for the last 52 years, he was born in Newark. He served as Audubon's chief of police for a quarter of a century. Mr. Sipple was hired as the department's first paid police officer and its chief in 1948. Prior to that, he had worked at the old New York Shipyard in Camden. But police work wasn't totally new to him. Chief Sipple was a second-generation police officer.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
Audubon Park Mayor William Cullen confidently leaned back in his chair and lit another cigarette. A wave of smoke trailed through his gray hair as he contemplated the borough's latest pile of correspondence. Slowly, Cullen leaned forward, elbows resting on the sprawling desk blotter that designates the mayor's spot at the dais during council meetings. The six- member council that flanked his central seat barely moved, awaiting direction. Running this community of 1,274 residents has become second nature after serving 18 years in the mayoral post, Cullen noted.
NEWS
March 20, 1986 | By Marybeth Farrell, Special to The Inquirer
The Audubon Park Borough Council Monday unanimously approved a 1986-87 budget of $234,334. The budget will raise property taxes by about 17 percent. Residents will pay $2.74 per $100 of assessed property value, an increase of 41 cents, borough officials said. That means the owner of a home assessed at $50,000 will pay $1,370 in municipal taxes, about $190 more than last year. The 1986 budget represents a 6 percent increase over last year. The main reasons for the increase were higher insurance costs, which rose to $20,000 from $11,000, police salaries and general operating expenses, Mayor William Cullen said.
NEWS
October 30, 1994 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With Democratic candidates running unopposed for mayor and two Borough Council seats, it's politics as usual in this tiny town. In Audubon Park, Democratic candidates usually run unopposed, and Republicans, who are outnumbered by more than 8-1, usually don't even bother to file. The last Republican to hold office in the borough was Mayor Ralph Epperson, who was defeated in 1978 by William Cullen. In the 16 years since Cullen has been mayor, no Republicans have run for any office.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
Two officials in the tiny borough of Audubon Park announced Thursday that they had switched their party affiliation from Democratic to Republican, putting a small crack in the Democratic stronghold that is Camden County. The shift by Mayor Larry Pennock increases from two to three the number of GOP mayors in county municipalities with partisan elections. He was joined by Councilman John Carpinelli. Pennock said he registered as a Republican more than two months ago in advance of New Jersey's June 7 primary.
NEWS
February 7, 2016
Founder and director Nancy Welsh likes to say that Almost Home Animal Shelter is where "little miracles happen every day. " But Almost Home is almost broke. And it may take a miracle for the somewhat makeshift facility - envisioned as temporary when it opened in a Pennsauken warehouse a decade ago - to survive. "It's very emotional for everyone," says Welsh, 56, of Collingswood. "This is a labor of love. We love what we do for the animals, and for people, too. " Having lost the last of its six municipal service contracts at the end of 2015, Almost Home stopped accepting new animals on Dec. 31. It may be forced to close at the end of March.
NEWS
August 31, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
If you live in Audubon Park, your neighbors are probably "the people you grew up with," says Mary Stokes, who moved there with her parents in 1941. Stokes is 74 now, and she and other residents love the villagelike coziness of this unusual Camden County municipality. Audubon Park is a single square mile between Nicholson Road, the Black Horse Pike, and Peter's Creek. It has no stores, schools, or churches, and the real estate is collective property. "There were supposed to be Audubon Parks all over America," says Kristin M. Szylvian, whose book The Mutual Housing Experiment - New Deal Communities for the Urban Middle Class was published in July by Temple University Press.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald M. Pennock, 80, mayor of Audubon Park for three terms, from January 1995 through December 2006, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Sunday, Aug. 24, at the Elmwood Hills Healthcare Center in Blackwood. His son Larry, the present mayor of the Camden County borough, said his father also was a member for 54 years of the Audubon Park Volunteer Fire Company. Donald Pennock was its president for 12 years and its chief for 25 years, though not in consecutive years.
NEWS
December 4, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Peters Creek is turning into the swamp it's always wanted to be. Owned by the blue-collar Camden County boroughs of Audubon Park and Oaklyn, this placid waterway meanders between them for less than a mile before flowing into the Newton Creek near the Black Horse Pike. Peters Creek was dredged and, in effect, widened decades ago. But like the Newton, which also has been altered, the stream bed is inexorably filling with sediment. This marshification has yielded bumper crops of spatterdock and other aquatic plants, a development local environmentalists are inclined to accept and at least some nearby residents . . . aren't.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN An Audubon Park woman was sentenced Friday to 30 years in prison without parole for stabbing her boyfriend to death during an argument in 2010. Paige Pfefferle, then 19, and Matthew Hus, 21, of Audubon, had argued Sept. 4, 2010, over whether she should live on campus at La Salle University, where she was studying criminal justice and psychology, or at home. She stabbed Hus in the chest in her parents' kitchen with an 81/2-inch knife. She put the bloody knife back into the butcher block, and crime photos showed that the scene and Hus' chest had been mostly cleaned up, Superior Court Judge Samuel D. Natal said in recounting the facts of the case.
NEWS
September 28, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
AUDUBON PARK A jury in Camden County found a 22-year-old Audubon Park woman guilty Thursday of killing her boyfriend nearly three years ago. Paige Pfefferle, a La Salle University student, stabbed Matthew Hus, 21, of Audubon, with a butcher knife Sept. 4, 2010, during an argument, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said. After a two-week trial, the jury deliberated for three hours before reaching the guilty verdict on murder, weapons, and hindering charges. Pfefferle's attorney, Jamie Kaigh, said he planned to appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Kellie Patrick Gates, For The Inquirer
Hello there In 2008, Wednesdays were CJ's favorite day of the week. He was a medical case manager at Mazzoni Center, a health center for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people - the same place Alison did mental-health assessments for those beginning hormone treatment. Usually, CJ and Alison worked in separate buildings. On Wednesdays, they shared an office. CJ would tell Alison he needed to talk about a client, even when he had the needed info. "It was a convenient way to follow her around, like a little puppy," he admits.
NEWS
September 8, 2010 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Matthew Christopher Hus deeply loved Paige Pfefferle from the time the Camden County couple met at her Sweet 16 party three years ago, relatives said. With a muscular 6-foot-2 frame, Hus played football and baseball. Pfefferle was the petite cheerleader watching her guy from the sidelines. Both came from families who have lived in the area for generations. They talked of marriage. On Tuesday, Pfefferle, 19, who lives on a quiet cul-de-sac in Audubon Park, was arraigned on a murder charge.
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