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Aung San Suu Kyi

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NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press
OSLO, Norway - Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi declared Saturday that the Nobel Peace Prize she won while under house arrest 21 years ago helped shatter her sense of isolation and ensured that the world would demand democracy in her military-controlled homeland. Suu Kyi received two standing ovations in Oslo's city hall as she gave her long-delayed acceptance speech to the Norwegian Nobel Committee in front of Norway's King Harald, Queen Sonja, and about 600 dignitaries.
NEWS
May 4, 1996 | By Dennis Bernstein and Leslie Kean
In Burma these days, wild elephants are captured and used for forced labor. Often, they're treated better than the more than one million humans subjected to the same fate by the country's ruling generals. The beasts are shot with tranquilizers at the time of capture. But men, women and children receive nothing to dull the pain as, shackled and beaten, they forcibly labor for tourism and infrastructure development. The same goes for political prisoners, who languish in Burma's prisons, some of them chained to military dog cells and fed food that animals refuse to eat. Burma's struggle for human rights exploded into world headlines in 1988, when thousands of peaceful demonstrators were massacred by the military.
NEWS
December 23, 2005
If President Bush's family was in the rice business I'm sure our troops would be in Burma rather then Baghdad. At least if the troops were in Burma they would be helping people who understand and deserve democracy. Aung San Suu Kyi, the nations democraticly elected leader whose NLD party won 85 percent of the vote, is still under house arrest while a miltary dictator rules the country with an iron fist. Do you think Bush really cares about democacy? Don Gallagher Philadelphia
NEWS
November 22, 2011
Statue of Reagan unveiled in Poland WARSAW, Poland - Former Polish president and anticommunist leader Lech Walesa unveiled a statue of Ronald Reagan near the U.S. Embassy in Warsaw, honoring the late U.S. president for inspiring Poland's toppling of communism. Though Reagan's legacy is mixed in the United States, he is considered by many in Eastern Europe as the greatest American leader in recent history for challenging the Soviet Union. "I wonder whether today's Poland, Europe, and world could look the same without President Reagan," Walesa said.
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Cheering crowds welcomed Aung San Suu Kyi home Saturday from her triumphant tour of Europe, where she won enthusiastic support for her role in Myanmar's democratic transition and was celebrated like a head of state. Thousands of jubilant supporters packed into Yangon's airport and lined the roads outside waving opposition party flags and holding banners, including one that said: "We are proud of you Mother Suu!" Others were clearly impressed by the honorary doctorate degree she was awarded at Oxford University, shouting: "Long Live Dr. Aung San Suu Kyi!"
NEWS
September 25, 2007 | Inquirer wire services
The protests in Myanmar began Aug. 19 after the government in one of Asia's poorest countries sharply raised fuel prices. But the protests are also based in deep-rooted dissatisfaction with the military government. Since the military crushed a peaceful nationwide uprising in 1988, killing an estimated 3,000 civilians, the country has sunk further into poverty and repression. The current discontent mirrors that of the 1988 uprising - anger over a brutal government that has turned one of Southeast Asia's best-endowed and most-sophisticated nations into one of its most repressed and destitute.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Aung Gyi, 93, a senior army officer who served briefly in Myanmar's postcoup military junta, but later became a founder of the country's pro-democracy movement, died Thursday of cardiac arrest. Brig. Gen. Aung Gyi was second in command in the army, then in the junta set up after Gen. Ne Win seized power in a 1962 coup. But the next year, Mr. Gyi's public comments about the coup and economic policies led to his ouster. He was imprisoned in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s for his continuing criticism, but his open letters to Ne Win about economic reform were a catalyst for the failed 1988 mass pro-democracy uprising that toppled his former superior.
NEWS
September 27, 2007
For the suffering people of Myanmar, the nation once known as Burma, 88 is an unlucky number. But it also represents the Burmese craving to bring down the repressive government that has ruled the country. The memory of the brutal suppression of pro-democracy protesters in 1988 has been vividly revived with recent demonstrations in the former capital of Yangon led by the Southeast Asian nation's Buddhist monks. For more than a week, the revered monks largely had been left alone by the military junta.
NEWS
April 5, 2012 | By Matthew Lee, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration said Wednesday that it would soon nominate an ambassador to Myanmar and ease some travel and financial restrictions on the formerly military-run Southeast Asian nation following historic elections that saw opposition gains in parliament. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton announced the steps at the State Department, calling Sunday's election a "dramatic demonstration of popular will that brings a new generation of reformers into government" that deserved recognition.
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NEWS
September 23, 2013 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
How do you get from Philadelphia to Myanmar? It's easy, Jim Connor says: Turn left at Thailand. The hard part comes once you're there, trying to work with and around a slowly, slowly opening government that's not used to outsiders and is particularly suspicious of social workers. Connor, 40, spent the last decade on the contentious Thailand-Myanmar border, his Whispering Seed project providing housing, education, and job skills to orphans and to children from displaced families.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Aye Aye Win, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Aung San Suu Kyi was selected Sunday to continue as head of Myanmar's main opposition party, keeping her leadership post even as the party undergoes a makeover to adjust to the country's new democratic framework. The Nobel laureate was named chairwoman of the National League for Democracy's new executive board on the final day of a landmark three-day party congress attended by 894 delegates from around the country. The congress also expanded the group's Central Executive Committee from seven members to 15, in a revitalization and reform effort ahead of Myanmar's 2015 general election.
NEWS
November 21, 2012 | By Jim Kuhnhenn and Julie Pace, Associated Press
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - For all the attention wrenched elsewhere in recent days - on violence in the Middle East, the fiscal cliff back home - President Obama's speedy trip to Southeast Asia achieved a major goal: It was clearly seen in the region as a validation of Asia's strategic importance as the United States refocuses its foreign policy to counter China's clout. It wasn't easy. Even in a Buddhist monastery in Thailand, Obama could not escape the budget woes waiting for him back home.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Julie Pace, Associated Press
YANGON, Myanmar - Launching a landmark visit to long- shunned Myanmar, President Obama said Monday that he came to "extend the hand of friendship" to a nation moving from persecution to peace. But his praise and personal attention came with an admonition to those in charge: The work of ensuring and protecting freedoms has just begun. On an overcast and steamy day, Obama touched down Monday morning, becoming the first U.S. president to visit the Asian nation also known as Burma. Tens of thousands of people packed the streets to see his motorcade speed through the city.
NEWS
November 17, 2012
By Patricia DeBoer On Monday, President Obama is expected to become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar (Burma), the strongest endorsement yet of the country's reform efforts. There is no doubt that tremendous political change has taken place in Myanmar, including the election of opposition party members - among them Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi - to the new government. Washington has lifted long-standing sanctions and normalized relations with the once-isolated country.
NEWS
October 27, 2012
Aung Gyi, 93, a senior army officer who served briefly in Myanmar's postcoup military junta, but later became a founder of the country's pro-democracy movement, died Thursday of cardiac arrest. Brig. Gen. Aung Gyi was second in command in the army, then in the junta set up after Gen. Ne Win seized power in a 1962 coup. But the next year, Mr. Gyi's public comments about the coup and economic policies led to his ouster. He was imprisoned in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s for his continuing criticism, but his open letters to Ne Win about economic reform were a catalyst for the failed 1988 mass pro-democracy uprising that toppled his former superior.
NEWS
September 26, 2012 | By Tom Coyne, Associated Press
FORT WAYNE, Ind. - Thousands of elated supporters greeted Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi with cheers, tears, and a standing ovation Tuesday as she took to the stage at the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum in Fort Wayne, Ind., home to one of the largest Burmese communities in the United States. Among them was Myo Myint, who, like Suu Kyi, was imprisoned in Myanmar in 1989. But Myint, who spent 15 years as a political prisoner and wants to return home, said he doesn't believe Suu Kyi will be able to help him do so. That's because he says he's too well-known for working against the junta, having been featured in an HBO documentary called Burma Soldier.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Charles Wilson, Associated Press
FORT WAYNE, Ind. - Eight thousand miles separate southeast Asia from the American Midwest, but when Myanmar democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi visits an Indiana city on Tuesday, it will be a kind of homecoming. Fort Wayne, home to one of the United States' largest Burmese populations, has become an unlikely base for opposition to the country's former military regime. Here, Suu Kyi's followers meet regularly, criticizing what's happening in their homeland through Voice of America broadcasts and YouTube videos, lobbying Congress for continued economic sanctions, and raising money for the opposition in Myanmar, also known as Burma.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Emily Wax, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The elder stateswoman of the human-rights struggle sat on stage in pearls and a floor-length traditional skirt, pink roses pinned in her chignon. The shaggy performance artist whose punk-rocker wife sits in a Moscow jail rose with the couple's 4-year-old daughter, who placed a bouquet in Aung San Suu Kyi's lap. On Thursday, 400 young activists gathered in Washington at the Newseum and applauded. A generation and a continent apart, the understated Suu Kyi, one of the world's most famous political prisoners until her release in Myanmar in 2010, briefly shared the spotlight with friends and family of the feminist culture warriors known as Pussy Riot, three of whose members are serving two years in prison for an anti-Kremlin stunt in a Moscow cathedral.
NEWS
September 20, 2012 | By Matthew Pennington, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Lawmakers united by their respect for Myanmar democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi presented her with Congress' highest civilian honor in a ceremony Wednesday in the Capitol Rotunda, ahead of a meeting with President Obama. Suu Kyi called it "one of the most moving days of my life. " She was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2008 while under a 15-year house arrest for her peaceful struggle against military rule. Her long-awaited visit to America finally provided an opportunity for her to receive the honor in person in Congress' most majestic setting, beneath the dome of the Capitol and ringed by marble statues of former presidents.
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