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Aura

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1991 | By Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
If the city is heading to hell on a handrail, maybe it should follow Rome's example. No, not set the city on fire, but get new advisers. After all, Rome flourished for centuries, and its emperors relied on seers whose advice was based on reading animal entrails. Well, we passed on the greasy gopher guts. But to check on the city's aura and figure out where we're at on the official Daily News Psych-o-Meter, we solicited a squadron of soothsayers who provided a paranormal peek into the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Lena Dunham's film debut, "Tiny Furniture," explores the ennui that haunts recent college graduates armed with nothing but a liberal arts degree and a sense of entitlement. Dunham wrote, directed and starred in "Tiny Furniture," and the character Aura mirrors Dunham's own life, which explains how she was able to eerily capture Aura's aimlessness, even as she lives rent-free in Manhattan. Aura is a recent graduate of an Ohio college (Dunham graduated from Oberlin in 2008) who moves back into her family's stark white Tribeca loft with no ambition or desire to leave the apartment.
NEWS
August 23, 1986
To maintain the aura tourists look for if travelers are to bring money to this city, attention must be paid to NewMarket, which is beginning to look depressingly like a ghost town. Empty stores and neglect do not bring tourists. Rents are high and storekeepers are probably not finding it viable. For the good of the city, rent subsidies should be considered for NewMarket, where rents are formidably high. Either shut it down or make some pragmatic efforts to maintain it - by the city government, if trade is to flourish.
NEWS
November 3, 1990 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
Petite and pouty, with a head too big for his body and a body teetering on sky-high heels, Prince is sort of the Pee-wee Herman of sex symbols. This Minnesota rock star is a batty-eyed narcissist whose forays into filmdom - 1984's Purple Rain and 1986's Under the Cherry Moon (there also was a concert pic in '87) - have been, depending on one's frame of mind, gloriously enjoyable howlers or just plain dogs. Graffiti Bridge, which arrives not-so-hot-on-the-heels of Prince's mid- summer album of the same name, is a real fox terrier - a dark-blue haze of a movie in which Prince resurrects his Purple Rain protagonist, The Kid, and again does battle with Morris Day, his cartoonish nemesis and leader of the funk group The Time.
SPORTS
September 5, 1991 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Last week's arrest of two star Notre Dame players has overshadowed the seventh-ranked Fighting Irish's first meeting on the football field in 33 years with downstate rival Indiana. Now the real fun begins. Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz has made an art form of turning adversity to his own advantage, and his circle-the-wagons approach to the events of last Friday evening, when quarterback Rick Mirer and linebacker Demetrius DuBose were arrested for drunken and disorderly behavior at an off-campus party, offers college football's most famous amateur magician an unexpected opportunity to levitate his team going into its season opener (Channel 3, 1:30 p.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2011
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You'll make big plans because you realize that without them you'll be reacting to life instead of creating it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Realizing that people want what they cannot have, you'll use reverse psychology. You'll make sure that what you offer has an aura of exclusivity about it. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You can take care of yourself. You'll remind everyone where your personal boundaries lie. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You may feel something you want slipping away.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2010
OFTEN, THE times can influence how we define someone as much as the person themselves. In the case of actress Pam Grier, she rode a wave of black nationalism and feminist passions all the way to superstar status during the blaxploitation era of the 1970s. The karate-kicking, high-heel-wearing characters Grier portrayed in cult classics such as "Coffy" and "Foxy Brown" were fierce, independent and sexy. They hunted down bad guys and dealt their own brand of street justice. This was a novel concept at the time because it happened during a period in American cinema when it was more common for actresses to portray damsels in distress or the beautiful sidekick than to drive a narrative the way Grier's characters did. Audiences loved watching Grier beat people up on-screen while also flashing a little skin.
NEWS
January 4, 1988 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Anything can happen in a county courthouse, particularly in South Florida. When you think of all the oddballs and riffraff that clot the main arteries of criminal justice, you just don't get too excited when, say, some woman refuses to pass through a security checkpoint for fear of damaging her personal aura. Let's say you were the Broward County sheriff. Say you'd set up a walk- through metal detector at the threshold of the jail to screen for weapons. And maybe this woman walked up and - not wanting to create havoc in the eight- foot aura enveloping her body - opted against entering.
SPORTS
January 13, 1994 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They still talk with awe about the time the amazing Steve Carlton got hit in the neck by a line drive and never changed expression. They still speak with shock about how mysterious it was that the most unhittable pitcher they'd ever seen never threw a no-hitter. And the people who played alongside Steve Carlton still get chills when they think about the euphoric feeling before Game 6 of the 1980 World Series, knowing they were going to win - because The Great Left One was pitching.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1989 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
The message of the new Rolling Stones album, "Steel Wheels": If you don't have steel body parts for support, you'll never survive a relationship, a long hard, torturous roller-coaster ride. You simply won't survive the trip. Written, recorded and mixed in just six months, "Steel Wheels," which hit record stores earlier this week, sometimes feels skittish, slapdash. Especially at the album's outset, with "Sad, Sad, Sad," and "Mixed Emotions" (the first single released from the album)
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NEWS
November 11, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Lady Gaga is a mess. That's hardly an insult. Everyone loves a good mess. Lady Gaga knows. For Gaga - crafty songwriter and powerhouse singer - a holy mess is a fallback position. Even at her most focused, empowered, sexually driven, and aware, she can break down into schizophrenic absurdity (or downright awkwardness) - with matching costumes that make David Bowie seem buttoned-down. Now we have the new Gaga CD, titled ARTPOP (Interscope ***). ARTPOP makes a mess - then cleans it up, and just barely triumphs over the disarray.
SPORTS
September 1, 2013 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOUTH BEND, Ind. - Not long after Temple's plane landed Friday, first-year coach Matt Rhule ordered the buses to take a quick swing by Notre Dame Stadium, which is expected to be sold out (80,795) on Saturday for the 234th consecutive game. "I want them to get to see the stadium, to see Touchdown Jesus," Rhule said earlier this week. "Get an appreciation for history and then move on, because we've got a game to play. " That game is finally here Saturday, on national television (NBC10, 3:30 p.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2011
ARIES (March 21-April 19). You'll make big plans because you realize that without them you'll be reacting to life instead of creating it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Realizing that people want what they cannot have, you'll use reverse psychology. You'll make sure that what you offer has an aura of exclusivity about it. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You can take care of yourself. You'll remind everyone where your personal boundaries lie. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You may feel something you want slipping away.
NEWS
July 31, 2011
Pop Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns (New West ***1/2) "I got me a deuce and a quarter, babe / She will ride you right," John Hiatt boasts on "Detroit Made," singing of General Motors' Buick Electra 225. The celebration of automotive style, craftsmanship, and durability is fitting, since these qualities continue to mark the work of the 58-year-old Indiana-born singer and songwriter. Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns shows Hiatt's muse to be as sharp as ever. Amid another earthy amalgam of rock, soul, blues, and country, Hiatt still writes about restless, haunted, and on-the-edge souls with the penetrating power of someone who's been there.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2011
Music Yes/Styx. When classic rock bands from the '70s hit the road, die-hard fans are often quick to question which of the original members are in or out. Not that it really matters when it comes to Yes and Styx, the two prog-rock stalwarts headlining Monday's Let Freedom Rock Fest in Camden. The two bands' July Fourth show marks the start of their joint 22-date tour. Fans can expect to hear all the bombastic biggies - from Yes' "Roundabout" to Styx's "Come Sail Away" - along with newer material from Yes' soon-to-be released Fly From Here album and Styx's still-in-production Regeneration, Volume 2, a collection of rerecordings of hits including "Renegade" and "Blue Collar Man. " - Nicole Pensiero With guest Them Bones at the WMGK Let Freedom Rock Fest, 7 p.m. Monday, at the Susquehanna Bank Center, 1 Harbour Blvd., Camden.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
On a good night, opera soprano Michelle Johnson is the bullfighter and the audience is the bull - there to be teased, attracted, provoked, and (pleasurably) slain. Though plenty of fine artists have come out of Philadelphia's Academy of Vocal Arts, few command the stage as completely as Johnson - not just with her voice but with an aura that rarely registers in photographs or the handful of live-performance videos on YouTube. And during rehearsals for the academy's forthcoming production of Don Giovanni , opening Saturday with Johnson, 28, as Donna Anna, even keen observers might not square her stage presence with the bubbly young woman from Pearland, Texas, who greets you offstage.
NEWS
February 17, 2011 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
The revolution has galvanized a wave of national pride, and Egyptians have lost their fear of rulers. A2.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2010 | By MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
Lena Dunham's film debut, "Tiny Furniture," explores the ennui that haunts recent college graduates armed with nothing but a liberal arts degree and a sense of entitlement. Dunham wrote, directed and starred in "Tiny Furniture," and the character Aura mirrors Dunham's own life, which explains how she was able to eerily capture Aura's aimlessness, even as she lives rent-free in Manhattan. Aura is a recent graduate of an Ohio college (Dunham graduated from Oberlin in 2008) who moves back into her family's stark white Tribeca loft with no ambition or desire to leave the apartment.
NEWS
August 5, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Wilson Hughes, 90, of Aura, a longtime farmer and agriculture advocate who served his community as a firefighter, deputy mayor, and school board member, died after a stroke on Friday, July 30, at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Voorhees. Mr. Hughes, who was born in Hardingville and was a lifelong resident of the rural town of Aura, grew up helping his father on the family farm and sometimes went with him on weekends to the Dock Street markets in Philadelphia to sell their produce.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2010
OFTEN, THE times can influence how we define someone as much as the person themselves. In the case of actress Pam Grier, she rode a wave of black nationalism and feminist passions all the way to superstar status during the blaxploitation era of the 1970s. The karate-kicking, high-heel-wearing characters Grier portrayed in cult classics such as "Coffy" and "Foxy Brown" were fierce, independent and sexy. They hunted down bad guys and dealt their own brand of street justice. This was a novel concept at the time because it happened during a period in American cinema when it was more common for actresses to portray damsels in distress or the beautiful sidekick than to drive a narrative the way Grier's characters did. Audiences loved watching Grier beat people up on-screen while also flashing a little skin.
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