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NEWS
October 10, 2003 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Austria revives memories with a coin honoring the Marshall Plan. The last of an eight-coin series, "Austria Through the Ages," the 20-euro silver piece marks postwar Austria's emergence from four-power governance from 1945 to 1955. The coin shows soldiers from the four nations riding in a jeep. Banners depicting agriculture and reconstruction hang below the letters ERP (for European Recovery Program) and "Marshall-Plan. " Austria's eagle is on the reverse, along with the 2003 date.
SPORTS
February 20, 1992 | Compiled from Daily News wire services
Petra Kronberger of Austria became a double gold medalist today by winning the slalom. First-run leader Julie Parisien of the United States faded badly in the afternoon and finished fourth. Annelise Coeberger gave New Zealand its first winter sports medal by rallying from eighth place to second, and Blanca Fernandez Ochoa of Spain was third. Kronberger completed two runs in 1 minute, 32.68 seconds, .42 faster than Coeberger and .67 ahead of Ochoa. Meanwhile, Evgeni Redkine of the Unified Team won the men's 20-kilometer biathlon race today.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | By Steve Twomey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kurt Waldheim easily won a six-year term as Austria's president yesterday, as voters shrugged off months of allegations that the former secretary-general of the United Nations covered up his service in Adolf Hitler's army and approved or knew about Nazi atrocities. With all votes tabulated, Waldheim, the candidate of the conservative People's Party, had captured 53.9 percent of the 4.7 million ballots cast in a runoff election with Socialist Kurt Steyrer, according to the Interior Ministry.
SPORTS
July 4, 2008 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just about two years ago, Eliza Hastings picked up an oar for the first time. Later this month, the Agnes Irwin senior will be representing the United States at the Junior World Rowing Championships in Austria. The Berwyn resident was among 18 young women selected for the U.S. team that will be competing July 22-27 in Linz/Ottensheim. She's now training with the U.S. team at Princeton University. Hastings went through two weeks of selection camp in New London, Conn., to make the team.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Clara Husak, 90, a native of Austria who immigrated to Philadelphia in 1910, died Friday at her home in Rhawnhurst. Mrs. Husak was born Likeria Cherkas in Vikno, Austria. At age 10, she left Austria with two of her eight siblings and sailed to the United States, eventually arriving in the port of Philadelphia. The family settled in Brewerytown. It was there, in 1918, that she met and married Alexander Husak. The couple had four children. While raising the family, Mrs. Husak also worked at the former Lincoln Liberty Building at Broad and Chestnut Streets as a maintenance employee.
NEWS
September 13, 2002 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
The euro, beginning as circulating coinage, is steadily gaining collectors' versions as members of the European Union expand their nationalistic identities in metal. Austria has just issued its first silver 20-euro coin celebrating the Renaissance. The coin is the fifth in a series that began in 2000 with schilling denominations. The next four coins in this "Austria through the ages" series will have euro valuations. All coins are struck in .900 fine silver. The new silver proof coin depicts Ferdinand I, the first of the Hapsburgs.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2014 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
ST. ANTON, Austria - In a remote alpine valley in western Austria, a local cheese farmer named Hannes Schneider opened a ski school in the 1920s. Soon people all over the world were learning his "Arlberg" technique, and modern skiing, as we know it, was born. The Arlberg region, named after the mountain range that stretches between Vorarlberg and Tyrol in Austria, is more than just a ski destination, it's a pilgrimage to a holy land. This terrain is some of the most challenging in the world for skiing.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | BY EDGAR M. BRONFMAN, From the New York Times
Now that Kurt Waldheim has been elected president of Austria, the international community must, sadly, heed the observation of Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan that his election amounts to an act of symbolic amnesty for the Holocaust. The Austrian presidency is largely an honorary position. It is supposed to represent high moral ground, to be above politics, to be a voice of conscience that rises above ordinary political considerations. But the election of Mr. Waldheim as head of state means that the currency of this office has been debased - and, further, that it will remain so for the six years he is expected to occupy it. To their credit, some 46 percent of the electorate did not vote for him. Yes, Kurt Waldheim did win nearly 54 percent of the votes cast.
SPORTS
July 6, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Ben Johnson of Canada yesterday ran his best time in a 100-meter race since returning to competition after the expiration last September of his two-year ban for steroid use. His time of 10.31 seconds placed him sixth at an international meet in Linz, Austria. American Dennis Mitchell won in 10.03 seconds, the victory following his triumph over Olympic gold medalist Carl Lewis in Lille, France, on Monday. Jamaican Ray Stewart was second in 10.18. U.S. runners dominated the track events.
NEWS
February 21, 2006 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
British historian David Irving was sentenced to three years in prison yesterday on charges that he denied the Holocaust, just hours after admitting he had been wrong to doubt the systematic murder of millions of Jews. To supporters, and even some critics, the other crime on trial was the oppression of free speech. "The way the law is written, I didn't have any other choice but to plead guilty," Irving said. He had faced as much as 10 years in prison. Irving, 67, heads to prison for statements he made during a lecture in Austria in 1989, when he said that the gas chambers of Auschwitz were a fairy tale.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
The woman in gold in the true story Woman in Gold was Adele Bloch-Bauer, a patron of the arts in turn-of-the-century Vienna, a regal beauty who posed for Gustav Klimt. Her portrait hung in the family's apartment on the Elisabethstrasse until March 1938, when Hitler's Third Reich annexed Austria. The lives of the city's thriving Jewish community were forever changed, and the Klimt, along with other artwork, jewelry, and valuables belonging to the Bloch-Bauers, was seized by the Nazis.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
George E. Ehrlich, 85, of Philadelphia, an internationally renowned rheumatologist and adviser to the World Health Organization, died Friday, Feb. 28, of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Arden Courts in King of Prussia. Dr. Ehrlich made his mark in Philadelphia as the director of rheumatology and chief of the Arthritis Center at Einstein Medical Center and Moss Rehabilitation Hospital from 1964 to 1980. But his influence went further. An international authority on rehabilitative management of rheumatic conditions, Dr. Ehrlich was trained in the post-World War II era, when the field of rheumatology was focused on discovering the cause of damage to the joints.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2014 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
ST. ANTON, Austria - In a remote alpine valley in western Austria, a local cheese farmer named Hannes Schneider opened a ski school in the 1920s. Soon people all over the world were learning his "Arlberg" technique, and modern skiing, as we know it, was born. The Arlberg region, named after the mountain range that stretches between Vorarlberg and Tyrol in Austria, is more than just a ski destination, it's a pilgrimage to a holy land. This terrain is some of the most challenging in the world for skiing.
SPORTS
December 31, 2013 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
VANCOUVER - To say December has been a big month for Michael Raffl would be an enormous understatement. Three days ago, Michael Raffl received the biggest phone call of his season - from Manny Viveiros, coach of the Austrian national team, letting him know that he was picked to represent his country in the upcoming Olympics. About 3 weeks before that, Raffl was notified by the Flyers that he would be sticking around for a while - he could finally select an apartment in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The silver candlesticks with trumpet bases may be slender and simple, but they have a hefty tale to tell. Come Wednesday at sundown, the start of the Jewish high holy days, those candlesticks will speak volumes when they are center stage on Jeffrey and Barbara Kutscher's holiday table in Moorestown. When Rosh Hashanah comes around next year, the candlesticks will be in a home in Bucks County, or possibly in the Baltimore area. In each new place, their impact will be deeply felt.
NEWS
June 22, 2013 | By Summer Ballentine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a painful past marked by time in Nazi labor and concentration camps, relatives said, Peter Siegler's warm and humorous personality never hardened. Dr. Siegler, 89, of Haverford, died Wednesday, June 5, of heart disease at his Naples, Fla., townhouse. The Hungarian native's first impression of America came in 1945, when he was starving and sick after spending about six months in a concentration camp in Austria during his 20s. He was liberated by soldiers, and when he asked for a smoke, a GI handed him not just one cigarette but a pack of Camels.
NEWS
May 10, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lewis Terry Hatcher, 90, of West Chester, who as a pilot flew 24 bombing missions over Europe during World War II, died Friday, May 3, at Paoli Memorial Hospital. Mr. Hatcher enlisted in November 1942 and trained as a B-17 pilot. He served with the 15th Air Force, at one point from a base in Foggia, Italy. He and his fellow airmen completed 24 bombing missions over Germany, Austria, Poland, Yugoslavia, and Italy. But it was the 19th mission, on March 16, 1945, in which he bombed the Schwechat oil refinery in Austria, that he called his "longest day. " The plane took off early that morning with a 6,000-pound payload.
SPORTS
February 7, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
LINDSEY VONN will head home for surgery in Colorado next week after tearing two ligaments in her right knee and breaking a bone in her lower leg in a crash at the world championships in Austria. Vonn said Wednesday that she plans to compete in the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics, which start in 12 months. She was released from the hospital late Tuesday and returned to the team hotel. "I am grateful to my fans for the outpouring of support, which has really helped me stay positive," Vonn said in a statement.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2012
Looking for the best ski destinations around the world? U.S. News & World Report offers this list on its website http://travel.usnews.com . 10. Munich, Germany 9. Lake Tahoe, Calif. 8. Calgary, Canada 7. Vancouver, Canada 6. Telluride, Colo. 5. Zurich, Switzerland 4. Vail, Colo. 3. Aspen, Colo. 2. Banff, Canada 1. Innsbruck, Austria
SPORTS
March 20, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
LINDSEY VONN topped the Alpine World Cup prize money list after capturing 12 events to win her fourth women's overall title. The American earned $608,000, finishing ahead of Marcel Hirscher , of Austria. The men's overall champion won nine times to receive $509,000. The International Ski Federation published the money list yesterday, a day after the season ended at Schladming, Austria. FIS requires minimum prize money of $110,000 per race. Soccer *  A friend of Fabrice Muamba told the Associated Press that the Bolton midfielder has started speaking again, 2 days after his cardiac arrest during a match.
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