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NEWS
February 18, 2001
Readers often ask us about the backgrounds of the opinion writers whose work appears on the Commentary Page. Many of these writers belong to interest groups, think tanks and opinion mills. Sorting out the political stances, allegiances and aims of these organizations can be confusing. But readers are sharp: They want to know where writers and their support groups stand. So we've set up a Web site titled "Sources of Authority. " You can visit it at http://home.phillynews.com/inquirer/opinion/archive/tanx.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester Redevelopment Authority Board appointed the Rev. Thomas Jackson as its permanent executive director at a meeting on Monday. Mr. Jackson, a former federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) management official, had served since March 18 as the authority's temporary executive director. He is the pastor at Chester's Calvary Baptist Church. He will be paid $60,000 a year. Mr. Jackson was hired to replace former board chief Willie Mae Wells, who was laid off in March after Chester's City Council seized the authority's bank accounts and cut off its money.
NEWS
May 16, 2005
IN HIS MAY 12 letter, David Lee asks why the local minimum-wage legislation does not cover all Philadelphians. The simple answer is that City Council does not have the authority to raise the minimum wage across the board in Philadelphia. That's why I am joining the lobby to raise the state minimum wage to create the maximum benefit for Philadelphia's working poor. I applaud Mr. Lee's compassion for the low-income citizens of this city. We must band together to lobby the state Legislature to raise the state minimum wage.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington City Housing Authority will receive bids Friday on an ambitious plan to completely refurbish the authority's 17 buildings at a cost of more than $1 million. The project, funded by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, will provide for renovations on all 90 units owned by the authority. Work should begin in about five weeks, said Joseph Badame, the architect overseeing the project. Through the extensive plan, each apartment will be redone from floor to ceiling.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | By Marc Duvoisin and Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Dan Meyers contributed to this article
Local political leaders have found much to bicker about since the city's chronic fiscal problems reached crisis proportions last summer. But there is one thing on which almost all of them agree: Philadelphia will be insolvent in July, or soon thereafter, unless the state legislature creates an authority to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars in the city's behalf. The question now is: Can that be done soon enough to make a difference? Cash projections indicate that the city treasury will be virtually empty on June 30. Major debt-service payments are due the next day and throughout July and August.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The selection of a new chairman and, possibly, a new executive director is expected to top the agenda at tonight's reorganization meeting of the Deptford Township Municipal Utilities Authority. Two top MUA officials resigned last month, and a third member of the authority is expected to be replaced because his reappointment was ruled invalid after he voted for himself. Gary Covely, an MUA member, is considered a leading candidate for the chairmanship. "He would do an excellent job as chairman, and he knows as much as anyone about the MUA," Township Solicitor Eugene McCaffrey Jr. said.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Two Bristol Township officials overstepped their authority by trying to negotiate with a businessman whose company is suing the township, three other officials say. The three, in interviews last week, said that Councilman Vince Lattanzi and Solicitor Clyde Waite had no right in a Feb. 7 meeting with businessman Gary Roberts to try to negotiate an end to a suit filed by Waste Alternatives Inc. in November. "Holding a private, nonadvertised meeting in a developer's place of business is inappropriate," Councilman Robert Lewis said.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Central Chester County Recycling Authority is considering three sites for a new processing center for recyclable materials, according to Emil Meyer, the authority's president. Meyer said at the authority's meeting Tuesday night that three sites were under consideration, two of which are owned by Lukens Steel Co. in Coatesville. Meyer said that Lukens had expressed an interest in selling the land, but that the authority wanted a donation. Meyer said the third site was on Valley Road in Valley Township and would be leased.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sea of red ink that has engulfed the balance sheets of the Chester County Solid Waste Authority for the last several years is departing. According to audited financial statements released last week, the authority's accumulated deficit dropped by more than $6 million last year, the result of revised engineering estimates on the costs of closing parts of the authority's Lanchester Landfill. As of the end of 1995, that deficit stood at $754,409, down from $6,775,000 at the beginning of the year.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority is continuing to keep a lid on all information concerning two multimillion-dollar consultant contracts. Developer Willard G. Rouse 3d, chairman of the authority, declined yesterday to discuss any aspect of the contracts, maintaining a nearly five- month public silence on an issue that has generated much controversy because of the anticipated cost to the city, the companies chosen and the lack of competition. Several Council members, at a public hearing in September, told Rouse that the authority should seek prices from other firms before making a final decision on the contracts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Given the Philadelphia Parking Authority's apparently ample time for gratuitous enforcement, ride-share crackdowns, and reality television, Jim Kenney's impulse to find more for the agency to do is understandable. The Democratic mayoral nominee, who recently suggested that the authority's ruthless army of meter monitors be mobilized to enforce construction codes and more, isn't the first to wonder whether its shock-and-awe strategy could be applied to matters more pressing than, well, parking.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News
TWO AUTHORS dominate the beer section of my bookshelf: the late-British newspaperman Michael Jackson, and Randy Mosher, the Chicago-based author whose Radical Brewing and Tasting Beer are bibles for any beer enthusiast. When Mosher stopped in town last week with his latest, Beer for All Seasons (Storey), I couldn't pass up a chance to sit down for a couple of beers. Here's an edited excerpt of our conversation. Q: Your latest book looks at the tradition of seasonal beers.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AFTER MONTHS of contentious negotiations over health care and seniority rules, members of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia last night authorized a strike if no resolution can be reached with the owner of the city's two daily newspapers and their website. "Striking is a last resort, and we certainly hope it doesn't come to that," Guild president Howard Gensler said at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel in Center City, where paper ballots were cast. "If it does, it's because the company forced the membership's hand.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Members of the largest union representing employees at The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com voted Wednesday evening to authorize strike preparations as ongoing contract negotiations have yielded no breakthroughs. The vote - 263-19 in the main unit and 24-7 in the unit representing Philly.com employees - authorized the executive board of the Newspaper Guild of Greater Philadelphia to plan for a strike by 445 employees at the city's two largest newspapers and their companion website.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jean Barr was the chief social worker when Dr. Ross V. Speck was the director of the department of social psychiatry at Hahnemann Medical College from 1964 to 1970. "There weren't many that would tackle the kinds of things that he would," Barr recalled. "Who else would go into these communes," in college neighborhoods such as Powelton in West Philadelphia, "and work with kids? "We would go for two or three hours in the evenings and get to know them pretty well," talking about their addictions.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
By late July, drivers in Philadelphia will be able to pay for parking with their cellphones and other mobile devices, under a contract announced Thursday by the Philadelphia Parking Authority. The PPA selected Pango USA, an American subsidiary of an Israeli company, to create a parking mobile-payment system that will allow users to pay by using a PPA smartphone app, visiting a PPA website, or calling an interactive voice system. Users will be required to pay a "convenience charge" of 1 cent per transaction, and there may be additional "minor" fees, PPA spokesman Martin O'Rourke said Thursday.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, DANA DiFILIPPO, REGINA MEDINA, DAVID GAMBACORTA & WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writers bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
A LONG, GRAY day of digging through the twisted-metal jigsaw-puzzle wreckage of Amtrak Train 188 in an industrial no man's land in Frankford yielded the first but hardly the last answer to what caused the worst Northeast Corridor rail accident in nearly three decades: Speed killed. Robert Sumwalt, of the National Transportation Safety Board, said at a news conference that data showed the train had hit 106 mph - more than double the 50 mph speed limit for the sharp left curve at Frankford Junction - right as the engineer hit the emergency brake, to no avail, in the derailment at 9:21 p.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
May 15, 2015
THE PHILADELPHIA Parking Authority is a fountain of new ways to be obdurate. This is about three T's - technology, testimony and ticking off a PPA parking enforcement officer. The technology and testimony I can prove. Incurring the wrath of an officer is supposition, but let's go for a ride. Brian Carroll, 38, carpools daily to his job in Newark, Del., where he is an engineer for an electric company. In February he got a ticket in the mail for making a "prohibited stop" on Jan. 30 at 5:24 p.m. in the 300 block of Catharine Street in Queen Village.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
THINK OF ALL the stupid - and criminal - things you did as a teen: Drinking in the woods with your friends. Smoking marijuana. Fistfighting. Or worse, stealing. Was it wrong? Yes. Did you get caught? If you grew up in white suburbia, probably not. But think about what could have happened if you grew up poor in a black or Latino neighborhood, where the "War on Drugs" felt like a war on you; where police officers routinely targeted you, just because you looked like you might be up to no good.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I have just one ground rule when I visit book clubs," novelist Nomi Eve said. "My standard phrase is, 'I have a thick skin, but it's not that thick, so please be nice to me.' " It's just as well that Eve's fans take her words to heart. Over the last six months, the lifelong Elkins Park resident has visited 90 book clubs to discuss her latest novel, Henna House . "I go into so many people's living rooms, and if they beat up on me, I'll come home every night crying," said Eve, who turned 47 last month.
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