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NEWS
February 18, 2001
Readers often ask us about the backgrounds of the opinion writers whose work appears on the Commentary Page. Many of these writers belong to interest groups, think tanks and opinion mills. Sorting out the political stances, allegiances and aims of these organizations can be confusing. But readers are sharp: They want to know where writers and their support groups stand. So we've set up a Web site titled "Sources of Authority. " You can visit it at http://home.phillynews.com/inquirer/opinion/archive/tanx.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester Redevelopment Authority Board appointed the Rev. Thomas Jackson as its permanent executive director at a meeting on Monday. Mr. Jackson, a former federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) management official, had served since March 18 as the authority's temporary executive director. He is the pastor at Chester's Calvary Baptist Church. He will be paid $60,000 a year. Mr. Jackson was hired to replace former board chief Willie Mae Wells, who was laid off in March after Chester's City Council seized the authority's bank accounts and cut off its money.
NEWS
May 16, 2005
IN HIS MAY 12 letter, David Lee asks why the local minimum-wage legislation does not cover all Philadelphians. The simple answer is that City Council does not have the authority to raise the minimum wage across the board in Philadelphia. That's why I am joining the lobby to raise the state minimum wage to create the maximum benefit for Philadelphia's working poor. I applaud Mr. Lee's compassion for the low-income citizens of this city. We must band together to lobby the state Legislature to raise the state minimum wage.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington City Housing Authority will receive bids Friday on an ambitious plan to completely refurbish the authority's 17 buildings at a cost of more than $1 million. The project, funded by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, will provide for renovations on all 90 units owned by the authority. Work should begin in about five weeks, said Joseph Badame, the architect overseeing the project. Through the extensive plan, each apartment will be redone from floor to ceiling.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | By Marc Duvoisin and Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Dan Meyers contributed to this article
Local political leaders have found much to bicker about since the city's chronic fiscal problems reached crisis proportions last summer. But there is one thing on which almost all of them agree: Philadelphia will be insolvent in July, or soon thereafter, unless the state legislature creates an authority to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars in the city's behalf. The question now is: Can that be done soon enough to make a difference? Cash projections indicate that the city treasury will be virtually empty on June 30. Major debt-service payments are due the next day and throughout July and August.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The selection of a new chairman and, possibly, a new executive director is expected to top the agenda at tonight's reorganization meeting of the Deptford Township Municipal Utilities Authority. Two top MUA officials resigned last month, and a third member of the authority is expected to be replaced because his reappointment was ruled invalid after he voted for himself. Gary Covely, an MUA member, is considered a leading candidate for the chairmanship. "He would do an excellent job as chairman, and he knows as much as anyone about the MUA," Township Solicitor Eugene McCaffrey Jr. said.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Two Bristol Township officials overstepped their authority by trying to negotiate with a businessman whose company is suing the township, three other officials say. The three, in interviews last week, said that Councilman Vince Lattanzi and Solicitor Clyde Waite had no right in a Feb. 7 meeting with businessman Gary Roberts to try to negotiate an end to a suit filed by Waste Alternatives Inc. in November. "Holding a private, nonadvertised meeting in a developer's place of business is inappropriate," Councilman Robert Lewis said.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Central Chester County Recycling Authority is considering three sites for a new processing center for recyclable materials, according to Emil Meyer, the authority's president. Meyer said at the authority's meeting Tuesday night that three sites were under consideration, two of which are owned by Lukens Steel Co. in Coatesville. Meyer said that Lukens had expressed an interest in selling the land, but that the authority wanted a donation. Meyer said the third site was on Valley Road in Valley Township and would be leased.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sea of red ink that has engulfed the balance sheets of the Chester County Solid Waste Authority for the last several years is departing. According to audited financial statements released last week, the authority's accumulated deficit dropped by more than $6 million last year, the result of revised engineering estimates on the costs of closing parts of the authority's Lanchester Landfill. As of the end of 1995, that deficit stood at $754,409, down from $6,775,000 at the beginning of the year.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority is continuing to keep a lid on all information concerning two multimillion-dollar consultant contracts. Developer Willard G. Rouse 3d, chairman of the authority, declined yesterday to discuss any aspect of the contracts, maintaining a nearly five- month public silence on an issue that has generated much controversy because of the anticipated cost to the city, the companies chosen and the lack of competition. Several Council members, at a public hearing in September, told Rouse that the authority should seek prices from other firms before making a final decision on the contracts.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Judging by the plummeting value of taxi ownership and robust demand for transportation alternatives, Philadelphians want ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft to be in business here as they are in much of the state and nation. So why is the city's traveling public financing an expensive campaign to keep the companies illegal? The Philadelphia Parking Authority has spent more than half a million dollars on a firm that has been lobbying legislators to keep Uber, Lyft, and the like out of Philadelphia, the Daily News' William Bender reported last week - effectively using parking fines and other revenue collected from those who live, work, and travel in the city to limit the same public's transportation options.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Emails between the Philadelphia Parking Authority and taxi owners about legislation to limit ride-sharing services in the city are evidence of the PPA actively fighting against cab competitors, rather than just regulating, Uber representatives said Friday. "The PPA is unelected, unaccountable, and now we know untrustworthy as well," Jon Feldman, Uber's Pennsylvania general manager, said at a news conference Friday afternoon. The parking authority has authority over taxis in Philadelphia, and receives money from the industry in the form of medallion sales and licensing fees.
NEWS
January 29, 2016
ANN RICHARDS, former governor of Texas, became famous for one quip about George H.W. Bush by saying, "He was born with a silver foot in his mouth. " You have to admit it was amusing. OK, you don't have to, but a lot of people enjoyed the viper-like humor. Ann's daughter Cecile, president of Planned Parenthood, has carried on the tradition of joking about body parts. Well, not Cecile herself, but some of the people who work for her. There is no one with a pulse who hasn't seen or heard of the undercover videos filmed by David Daleiden and the Center for Medical Progress, in which Planned Parenthood employees are seen munching on salad and chuckling about how they could perform abortions in such a way as to preserve the choicest organs.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Parking Authority officials have publicly portrayed themselves as unbiased enforcers in the war between the flailing taxi industry and insurgent ride-sharing companies like UberX and Lyft. You might have heard their standard line: PPA is simply enforcing state law by cracking down on transportation network services, which use mobile apps to connect drivers and riders but are not licensed to operate within city limits. But emails obtained by the Daily News show that the parking authority has teamed with the taxi industry that it regulates in an effort to ensure that ride-sharing services remain illegal in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Parking Authority has received a $121,742 rebate from Peco Energy Co. for installing 1,400 energy-efficient LED lights on the terminal arrivals roadway at Philadelphia International Airport between Terminals A to F. The new lights, which replaced high-wattage conventional lighting, are estimated to save the Parking Authority $120,000 a year in energy costs. The parking authority owns and operates the Philadelphia airport parking garages. The rebate is part of Peco's "smart equipment incentives" program that gives small businesses, commercial and industrial customers, and government institutions financial rebates for energy-efficiency upgrades, said Peco spokesman Ben Armstrong.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday upheld the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's authority to manage demand response, the market for compensating electricity customers who reduce their power consumption during peak demand hours. Big electricity generators, who compete with demand response in power markets, had challenged FERC's authority. They argued that the federal agency may only regulate wholesale sales of electricity, and that demand response intrudes on the retail market, which is the sole province of state regulators.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
The groups that would like to develop the eastern end of the Navy Yard known as Southport include a real estate group funded by the California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS), a local Philadelphia refinery, and the politically connected but unsuccessful bidder for Philadelphia Gas Works, Liberty Energy Trust. The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority, which owns the land and plans to lease it, on Tuesday eliminated one of the seven original proposals. Six groups will now be asked to submit financial and development plans.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Peggy Anderson, 77, a longtime Philadelphia writer who penned a national best-seller about the life of a big-city hospital nurse, died Sunday, Jan. 17. Ms. Anderson, a former Inquirer writer and copy editor, was in Penn Medicine's hospice unit in Center City. She had been diagnosed with lung cancer nearly seven years ago. It went into remission, but returned last year and spread, said Mary Walton, a longtime friend. In 1978, Ms. Anderson achieved great success with her book Nurse . Ms. Anderson, whose mother was a nurse, spent two months trying to find someone who would best serve as the focus of her book.
NEWS
January 8, 2016
Lev Golinkin: "A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka" 3 p.m. Sunday at Gratz College, 7605 Old York Rd., Melrose Park. Admission: Free. Information: 215-635-7399 or http://onebook.jewishlearningventure.org
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Everyone knows the Soviet Union was an ugly, intolerant place for its Jewish citizens. It's common knowledge that prejudice and discrimination had been entrenched in the region since the time of the tsars. We all know it, but it's an entirely different thing to read about it from someone who lived through it, as did Lev Golinkin, author of A Backpack, a Bear, and Eight Crates of Vodka , his acclaimed memoir about escaping life in the USSR. It's this year's selection for Philadelphia's One Book One Jewish Community, a citywide literary outreach program from the Jewish Learning Venture.
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