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NEWS
February 18, 2001
Readers often ask us about the backgrounds of the opinion writers whose work appears on the Commentary Page. Many of these writers belong to interest groups, think tanks and opinion mills. Sorting out the political stances, allegiances and aims of these organizations can be confusing. But readers are sharp: They want to know where writers and their support groups stand. So we've set up a Web site titled "Sources of Authority. " You can visit it at http://home.phillynews.com/inquirer/opinion/archive/tanx.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester Redevelopment Authority Board appointed the Rev. Thomas Jackson as its permanent executive director at a meeting on Monday. Mr. Jackson, a former federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) management official, had served since March 18 as the authority's temporary executive director. He is the pastor at Chester's Calvary Baptist Church. He will be paid $60,000 a year. Mr. Jackson was hired to replace former board chief Willie Mae Wells, who was laid off in March after Chester's City Council seized the authority's bank accounts and cut off its money.
NEWS
May 16, 2005
IN HIS MAY 12 letter, David Lee asks why the local minimum-wage legislation does not cover all Philadelphians. The simple answer is that City Council does not have the authority to raise the minimum wage across the board in Philadelphia. That's why I am joining the lobby to raise the state minimum wage to create the maximum benefit for Philadelphia's working poor. I applaud Mr. Lee's compassion for the low-income citizens of this city. We must band together to lobby the state Legislature to raise the state minimum wage.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington City Housing Authority will receive bids Friday on an ambitious plan to completely refurbish the authority's 17 buildings at a cost of more than $1 million. The project, funded by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, will provide for renovations on all 90 units owned by the authority. Work should begin in about five weeks, said Joseph Badame, the architect overseeing the project. Through the extensive plan, each apartment will be redone from floor to ceiling.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | By Marc Duvoisin and Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Dan Meyers contributed to this article
Local political leaders have found much to bicker about since the city's chronic fiscal problems reached crisis proportions last summer. But there is one thing on which almost all of them agree: Philadelphia will be insolvent in July, or soon thereafter, unless the state legislature creates an authority to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars in the city's behalf. The question now is: Can that be done soon enough to make a difference? Cash projections indicate that the city treasury will be virtually empty on June 30. Major debt-service payments are due the next day and throughout July and August.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The selection of a new chairman and, possibly, a new executive director is expected to top the agenda at tonight's reorganization meeting of the Deptford Township Municipal Utilities Authority. Two top MUA officials resigned last month, and a third member of the authority is expected to be replaced because his reappointment was ruled invalid after he voted for himself. Gary Covely, an MUA member, is considered a leading candidate for the chairmanship. "He would do an excellent job as chairman, and he knows as much as anyone about the MUA," Township Solicitor Eugene McCaffrey Jr. said.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Two Bristol Township officials overstepped their authority by trying to negotiate with a businessman whose company is suing the township, three other officials say. The three, in interviews last week, said that Councilman Vince Lattanzi and Solicitor Clyde Waite had no right in a Feb. 7 meeting with businessman Gary Roberts to try to negotiate an end to a suit filed by Waste Alternatives Inc. in November. "Holding a private, nonadvertised meeting in a developer's place of business is inappropriate," Councilman Robert Lewis said.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Central Chester County Recycling Authority is considering three sites for a new processing center for recyclable materials, according to Emil Meyer, the authority's president. Meyer said at the authority's meeting Tuesday night that three sites were under consideration, two of which are owned by Lukens Steel Co. in Coatesville. Meyer said that Lukens had expressed an interest in selling the land, but that the authority wanted a donation. Meyer said the third site was on Valley Road in Valley Township and would be leased.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sea of red ink that has engulfed the balance sheets of the Chester County Solid Waste Authority for the last several years is departing. According to audited financial statements released last week, the authority's accumulated deficit dropped by more than $6 million last year, the result of revised engineering estimates on the costs of closing parts of the authority's Lanchester Landfill. As of the end of 1995, that deficit stood at $754,409, down from $6,775,000 at the beginning of the year.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Convention Center Authority is continuing to keep a lid on all information concerning two multimillion-dollar consultant contracts. Developer Willard G. Rouse 3d, chairman of the authority, declined yesterday to discuss any aspect of the contracts, maintaining a nearly five- month public silence on an issue that has generated much controversy because of the anticipated cost to the city, the companies chosen and the lack of competition. Several Council members, at a public hearing in September, told Rouse that the authority should seek prices from other firms before making a final decision on the contracts.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Close calls don't count in sports retailing, and that helps explain why it will soon be lights out for the Sports Authority store in Cherry Hill. The field is crowded - Dick's Sporting Goods (the 800-pound gorilla because of its scale), Modell's, REI, Cabela's, and Bass Pro Shops are among the players vying for the sporting dollar. There's also Schuylkill Valley Sports, an employee-owned firm with 18 stores in the Philadelphia region, and City Sports, an East Coast chain that tanked and is being revived by two Wharton-trained brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
A LARGE group of people who create books for children and teenagers are hoping to send a message to adults in North Carolina. Nearly 270 authors and illustrators have signed a letter calling on the state to repeal a new law preventing specific anti-discrimination rules for LGBT people for public accommodations and restroom use. The letter, which was posted on the School Library Journal website, said the 269 signees are "disappointed and angered by...
NEWS
April 3, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
James McBride: "Kill 'Em and Leave" 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Free Library of Philadelphia, 1901 Vine St. Admission: Free Information: 215-686-5322 or www.freelibrary.org
BUSINESS
April 1, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania American Water announced it has signed an agreement to acquire the wastewater assets of the Scranton Sewer Authority for $195 million. The company, a subsidiary of American Water of Voorhees, already provides water service to the sewer system's 31,000 customers. The transaction, which went through a 10-month bidding process, requires the approval of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, the state Public Utility Commission and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
NEWS
March 11, 2016
The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority Board on Wednesday selected Gregory Heller as its new executive director. Heller, CEO of the Baltimore-based nonprofit development corporation American Communities Trust, will fill the vacancy left by Brian Abernathy, who is now the first deputy managing director. Prior to working at American Communities Trust, Heller worked for Philadelphia-based Econsult Solutions and the Enterprise Center Community Development Corp. in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
City officials have begun steps to seize access to a strip of waterfront land from a Fishtown business for completion of a planned 3.3-mile bike and walking trail along the Delaware River. The Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority is in the process of getting an appraisal for an easement to the land behind the Henry Stewart Co. wire rope business between Penn Treaty Park and SugarHouse Casino, agency spokesman Paul Chrystie said Thursday. The city expects to acquire the easement within eight weeks, he said.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
Authorities on Wednesday night were trying to locate a 14-year-old boy who disappeared Tuesday afternoon from a facility in Chester County for children with developmental disabilities. John Thomas Parker was last seen walking away from the Devereux Leon Kanner Learning Center in West Whiteland Township about 2:30 p.m. Police said it was possible that Parker walked to a nearby train station to leave the area. His family lives in Washington Township. Parker is black, 5-feet 7-inches tall and about 110 pounds.
NEWS
February 8, 2016
Deana Vega lives with her mother and five younger siblings in a two-bedroom apartment above a passport photo store in Fairhill. The view through the steel bars covering the windows is bleak. The fading sun and palm tree adorning the hollowed-out remains of the La Terraza restaurant across the street. The corner boys. The evidence everywhere of drugs, violence, and hopelessness. But Deana sees past what lies outside. To the future she sees for herself. To a college classroom. To a job as a social worker.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Judging by the plummeting value of taxi ownership and robust demand for transportation alternatives, Philadelphians want ride-sharing services such as Uber and Lyft to be in business here as they are in much of the state and nation. So why is the city's traveling public financing an expensive campaign to keep the companies illegal? The Philadelphia Parking Authority has spent more than half a million dollars on a firm that has been lobbying legislators to keep Uber, Lyft, and the like out of Philadelphia, the Daily News' William Bender reported last week - effectively using parking fines and other revenue collected from those who live, work, and travel in the city to limit the same public's transportation options.
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