CollectionsAuthority
IN THE NEWS

Authority

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 18, 2001
Readers often ask us about the backgrounds of the opinion writers whose work appears on the Commentary Page. Many of these writers belong to interest groups, think tanks and opinion mills. Sorting out the political stances, allegiances and aims of these organizations can be confusing. But readers are sharp: They want to know where writers and their support groups stand. So we've set up a Web site titled "Sources of Authority. " You can visit it at http://home.phillynews.com/inquirer/opinion/archive/tanx.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
David Lapp is the director of policy research at Research for Action, a Philadelphia-based education organization ( www.reserachforaction.org ) A good charter school law must ensure that authorizers have actual authority over their charter schools. That's the conclusion to be gleaned from a recently released "performance" audit of the School District of Philadelphia's Charter School Office by state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale. The report finds the district compliant with state law "in all significant respects" on charter authorization, but suggests changes are needed to ensure quality.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester Redevelopment Authority Board appointed the Rev. Thomas Jackson as its permanent executive director at a meeting on Monday. Mr. Jackson, a former federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) management official, had served since March 18 as the authority's temporary executive director. He is the pastor at Chester's Calvary Baptist Church. He will be paid $60,000 a year. Mr. Jackson was hired to replace former board chief Willie Mae Wells, who was laid off in March after Chester's City Council seized the authority's bank accounts and cut off its money.
NEWS
May 16, 2005
IN HIS MAY 12 letter, David Lee asks why the local minimum-wage legislation does not cover all Philadelphians. The simple answer is that City Council does not have the authority to raise the minimum wage across the board in Philadelphia. That's why I am joining the lobby to raise the state minimum wage to create the maximum benefit for Philadelphia's working poor. I applaud Mr. Lee's compassion for the low-income citizens of this city. We must band together to lobby the state Legislature to raise the state minimum wage.
NEWS
June 15, 1988 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
The Burlington City Housing Authority will receive bids Friday on an ambitious plan to completely refurbish the authority's 17 buildings at a cost of more than $1 million. The project, funded by the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, will provide for renovations on all 90 units owned by the authority. Work should begin in about five weeks, said Joseph Badame, the architect overseeing the project. Through the extensive plan, each apartment will be redone from floor to ceiling.
NEWS
March 5, 1991 | By Marc Duvoisin and Thomas Turcol, Inquirer Staff Writers Inquirer staff writer Dan Meyers contributed to this article
Local political leaders have found much to bicker about since the city's chronic fiscal problems reached crisis proportions last summer. But there is one thing on which almost all of them agree: Philadelphia will be insolvent in July, or soon thereafter, unless the state legislature creates an authority to borrow hundreds of millions of dollars in the city's behalf. The question now is: Can that be done soon enough to make a difference? Cash projections indicate that the city treasury will be virtually empty on June 30. Major debt-service payments are due the next day and throughout July and August.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The selection of a new chairman and, possibly, a new executive director is expected to top the agenda at tonight's reorganization meeting of the Deptford Township Municipal Utilities Authority. Two top MUA officials resigned last month, and a third member of the authority is expected to be replaced because his reappointment was ruled invalid after he voted for himself. Gary Covely, an MUA member, is considered a leading candidate for the chairmanship. "He would do an excellent job as chairman, and he knows as much as anyone about the MUA," Township Solicitor Eugene McCaffrey Jr. said.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Two Bristol Township officials overstepped their authority by trying to negotiate with a businessman whose company is suing the township, three other officials say. The three, in interviews last week, said that Councilman Vince Lattanzi and Solicitor Clyde Waite had no right in a Feb. 7 meeting with businessman Gary Roberts to try to negotiate an end to a suit filed by Waste Alternatives Inc. in November. "Holding a private, nonadvertised meeting in a developer's place of business is inappropriate," Councilman Robert Lewis said.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | By Bill Tyson, Special to The Inquirer
The Central Chester County Recycling Authority is considering three sites for a new processing center for recyclable materials, according to Emil Meyer, the authority's president. Meyer said at the authority's meeting Tuesday night that three sites were under consideration, two of which are owned by Lukens Steel Co. in Coatesville. Meyer said that Lukens had expressed an interest in selling the land, but that the authority wanted a donation. Meyer said the third site was on Valley Road in Valley Township and would be leased.
NEWS
April 30, 1996 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sea of red ink that has engulfed the balance sheets of the Chester County Solid Waste Authority for the last several years is departing. According to audited financial statements released last week, the authority's accumulated deficit dropped by more than $6 million last year, the result of revised engineering estimates on the costs of closing parts of the authority's Lanchester Landfill. As of the end of 1995, that deficit stood at $754,409, down from $6,775,000 at the beginning of the year.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2016
Angela Richman, Death Investigator, Book 1 By Elaine Viets Thomas & Mercer. 320 pp. $15.95 Reviewed by Oline H. Cogdill Best known for her humorous, light mysteries, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., author Elaine Viets confidently strides into darker terrain with Brain Storm , the launch of a new series about death investigator Angela Richman. Angela is doing quite well at her job investigating any death that doesn't happen under a doctor's care in wealthy Choteau County, Mo., near St. Louis.
NEWS
August 12, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey was furious. In May 2012, top officials at the bistate agency lashed out at a processor of imported vehicles that operated at Port Newark and owed $2.8 million in rent and fees. The agency warned Foreign Auto Preparation Service (FAPS) that if it did not take remedial action quickly, it would be in violation of its lease. "For years, FAPS has failed to meet its financial responsibilities as a tenant at our port, and this practice stops today," then-Deputy Executive Director Bill Baroni said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
This election season, the American people are caught in the middle of a battle for two very different visions of our nation. Lorrie Kim, a West Philadelphia writer and confirmed Harry Potter superfan, thinks it's not unlike the battle between Potter and the Death Eaters, led by the creepy Lord Voldemort. (Author J.K. Rowling has likened the villain to Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump but hedged: "Voldemort was nowhere near as bad. ") In the face of all that, Kim says, the only hope is if we, the voters, invoke our inner Severus Snape.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Standard & Poor's Global Ratings cut the Philadelphia Housing Authority's credit rating by one notch, to A+ from AA-, citing three consecutive years of operating losses. The outlook is stable. PHA's operating loss for the 12 months ended March 31, 2015, the latest audited financial information available, was $37.9 million on $368 million in operating revenue, most of it from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. S&P attributed the financial weakness to declining federal subsidies, though federal revenue increased 5 percent in fiscal 2015 from the year before.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
THEODORE J. BERRY, 98, a Main Line physician, author, and educator, died Thursday, July 14, of pneumonia at his home in Naples, Fla. Dr. Berry lived in Villanova and then Bryn Mawr before moving to Naples in 1999. He was a prominent figure at Bryn Mawr Hospital for 45 years, practicing internal medicine and serving for a time as chief of staff. He retired in 1993 as director of medical education. Although Dr. Berry was hard-driving and productive, he also was very genial. Quietly and discreetly, he was physician and friend to the Main Line's elite families.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
It was the start of the 2016 ESPY Awards and there were four superstars onstage - LeBron James, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade and Chris Paul - standing extra tall as they spoke out against police brutality and called on their fellow athletes to do the same. It was a powerful moment. All those multi-millionaire athletes. Each his own mega-brand. Standing up for something besides just getting richer and winning NBA championships. My favorite part was when James, dressed in a classic black tuxedo, gazed into a camera and said, "It's time to look in the mirror and ask ourselves, 'what are we doing to bring about change?
NEWS
July 14, 2016 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Just grow up. Those are three words you will never hear at Christopher Phillips' dinner table, not even if everyone is grumpy or the girls are squabbling or someone topples her juice. That's because Phillips - longtime Philadelphia resident, author, and creator of the Socrates Café - believes we'd all be better off if adults worked harder to retain the best qualities of children: curiosity, forgiveness, empathy, flexibility, and hope. He details that conviction in his new book, The Philosophy of Childing: Unlocking Curiosity, Creativity, and Reason through the Wisdom of Our Youngest . It's dense with philosophers', psychologists', and artists' takes on childhood - from Aristotle's belief that children are small brutes incapable of reasoning to Picasso's oft-quoted declaration that "every child is an artist.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The uproar over whether the Camden County prosecutor's draconian "Always call 911" mandate should apply even in cases that teachers, principals, or parents once had the power to resolve has become quite an educational experience for Collingswood. Among the lessons so far: Straightforward, unambiguous and unequivocal face-to-face and written communication - particularly among borough, school, and law enforcement officials - is essential. So is straightforward, unambiguous, and unequivocal communication with those they serve, in this case, parents and students.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
Authorities are seeking new clues in the suspicious death of Stephanie Rosado, whose remains were found along the Delaware River after she disappeared in 2009. Rosado, who went by the nickname Star, lived in the 1000 block of South Merrimac Road in Camden, and was last seen April 12, 2009. The Camden County Prosecutor's Office did not disclose when or where along the Delaware Rosado's remains were discovered. Anyone with information on Rosado's case is urged to call Camden County Prosecutor's Office Det. Sgt. Paul Audino at 856-225-8449, or Camden County Police Sgt. Janelle Simpson 856-757-7042.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|