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NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
Even as a toddler, Timothy Denevi showed signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. By sixth grade, his angry tantrums had turned into physical fights with schoolmates. ADHD was not only affecting his mood, but threatening to compromise his academic record. But about 20 years later, Denevi has overcome his symptoms. He graduated from the University of Iowa with an M.F.A. degree in nonfiction and is now a visiting writer at George Mason University. "I'm very lucky," he said.
NEWS
January 8, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
Decades after dilapidated buildings filled with crime and drugs drove tenants to file a class-action lawsuit against the Chester Housing Authority, the agency has been released from federal receivership. The move, announced Monday, marks the completion of an overhaul of the public housing agency, which had been under the oversight of a federal judge since 1994. While under the guidance of District Judge Norma L. Shapiro, the authority razed and rebuilt most of its buildings and started its own police force.
NEWS
January 7, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Considering the Delaware River Port Authority's well-documented failings, reform legislation proposed by a bipartisan, bistate group of officials last year might seem mild to most observers. But it's too strong for Steve Sweeney. The New Jersey Senate president quickly declared the bill unnecessary, and as The Inquirer's Andrew Seidman reported this week, it has gone nowhere ever since. As much as Gov. Christie's recent veto of legislation to reform another bistate transportation agency, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, Sweeney's inaction represents a resounding vote for the status quo. Like its bridge-blocking big brother up north, the DRPA is a governmental backwater vulnerable to corruption, waste, and incompetence.
SPORTS
January 3, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
What Howie wants, Howie gets. There is no other conclusion to draw from the Eagles' dismissal of Tom Gamble, formerly their vice president of player personnel, formerly the man in the franchise's front office whom Chip Kelly respected most, formerly a thorn who apparently pricked general manager Howie Roseman one too many times. For years now, there really has been no other conclusion to draw about the power structure within the Eagles organization. Roseman has owner Jeffrey Lurie's ear. Lurie trusts him. Lurie puts him first.
NEWS
January 1, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey hired a consulting firm for $1 million to help a panel convened by the states' two governors analyze the embattled agency. The contract with Promontory Financial Group L.L.C. raises the price tag of the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, which already had saddled taxpayers and toll-payers with millions of dollars in legal fees. Gov. Christie of New Jersey and Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York released the panel's 103-page report on the future of the Port Authority late Saturday in a joint news release in which they announced they had vetoed a proposed legislative overhaul of the agency.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The governors of New Jersey and New York late Saturday vetoed legislation passed unanimously by each state's legislature to overhaul the operations of the Port Authority, and instead endorsed their own plan to revamp the troubled bistate agency. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a Democrat, had until Saturday to take action on the legislation, which needed the signature of each state's governor. About 6 p.m., Cuomo and Gov. Christie, a Republican, jointly released and endorsed a 103-page report compiled by a special panel the governors convened in May in the aftermath of the George Washington Bridge scandal, which laid bare cross-Hudson rivalries among leaders of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
This is the time when many of us pledge to do better in the new year. Among the top resolutions routinely are to lose weight and get more exercise. Before joining the health club or buying fitness equipment, you may want to read a provocative new book, Exercise Will Hurt You: Concussion, Traumatic Brain Injury, and How the Dangers of Sports and Exercise Can Affect Your Health. The author is Steven Barrer, director of the Neurosciences Institute and former chief of the division of neurosurgery at Abington Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
David Samson, the former chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey and a close ally of Gov. Christie, has dropped a lawsuit that sought to block a state ethics probe into alleged conflicts of interest between his role in a public office and the private business interests of his law firm. Samson and his firm, Wolff & Samson, withdrew their lawsuit Wednesday, court records show. Casey Woods, legal specialist for the state Ethics Commission, confirmed that the suit had been dropped but said he could not "comment on any open investigations.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsbury, with its vaunted ground-and-pound offensive attack, has had some top-notch rushers over the years. Kervin Michaud, Jackson Fagan, and Brandon Pepper are a few of the ballcarriers who have stood out since Galen Snyder took over the program in 2002. This season, Charles Snorweah, with his quickness and strength, set a new standard while sparking the Falcons to a 13-2 record and their first PIAA District 1 Class AAAA title since 2006. The 5-foot-10, 175-pound senior dynamo, a threat to go the distance on every touch, carried 309 times for a single-season school record of 2,774 yards and 38 touchdowns.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The on-again, off-again reopening of the Franklin Square PATCO station is on again. The Delaware River Port Authority board on Wednesday approved $500,000 in the agency's 2015 capital budget to examine reopening the "ghost station," closed since 1979. The long-range DRPA budget estimates the total cost of reopening the station beneath Sixth and Race Streets at $12 million. No date was set for reopening it. The rebirth of the once-seedy Franklin Square park above the station and new development nearby has brought renewed bustle to the area and renewed interest in again using the station.
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