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NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
State judicial authorities moved Wednesday to sanction two Philadelphia Municipal Court judges caught up in the corruption scandal that sent one of their colleagues to federal prison this year. The Judicial Conduct Board filed seven ethics counts against Judges Dawn Segal and Joseph O'Neill, and moved to suspend them for improper conversations with Judge Joseph C. Waters Jr. about cases before their courts. Waters, 61, was sentenced in January to two years in prison after admitting he used his influence to try to fix cases before his colleagues on behalf of political supporters and friends.
NEWS
March 11, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
After failing to sell any taxi medallions for new wheelchair-accessible cabs, the Philadelphia Parking Authority will slash the starting bid price to $50,000. The authority first put the new medallions up for auction at $475,000 last October, then cut the price to $350,000 in January, without attracting any buyers. The new weekly auctions will start May 6, PPA general counsel Dennis Weldon said Monday. The price for regular taxi medallions has slipped from about $500,000 to $400,000 in recent months, amid market uncertainty and the arrival of ride-share operators such as Uber and Lyft.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Detective Joe Murray was home on the couch when he saw the tweet. It was from Sarah Baicker. She covers the Flyers for CSNPhilly.com. She and Joe are Twitter friends. They both really like coffee and the movie Dirty Dancing. This tweet was about something serious, though. A GoFundMe account for a South Philly bike mechanic named Dom who got locked up trying to recover his friend's stolen bike. He had spotted it locked to a railing. The guy said he bought it on Craigslist. The guy gave him the bike back.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
THE Northeast's own Duane Swierczynski has a special place in the literary canon: He's the first guy to drop an F-bomb in an Archie comic. No, Swierczynski is not sullying the Riverdale gang with foul language. Instead, he's the author of "The Black Hood," the first in Archie's Dark Circle imprint of comics, out on Wednesday. "I'm sure my parents are very proud of that," he said. "If I had known that [milestone] before, I would have had Archie meet Samuel L. Jackson. " "The Black Hood," first created in 1940, centers on a cop who is horrifically wounded in a gunfight, leading him to become a vigilante crusading for his own brand of justice.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
James F. Kenney's resignation from Philadelphia City Council, after 23 years in which he sponsored hundreds of bills, has placed several of his would-be laws in legislative limbo. With almost a year until his seat is filled, Kenney said, he hopes his colleagues see some of his ideas through. As it stands, bills that he introduced that didn't make it out of committee died with his departure. Among the casualties are bills banning most parking on the City Hall apron, expanding the Historical Commission, making permanent the Inspector General's Office, and prohibiting deposits in certain banks.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane said in legal papers Wednesday that the special prosecutor who built a criminal case against her lacked any legal authority and that his work should be discarded as unlawful. Her lawyers noted that the state law authorizing the appointment of special prosecutors expired a dozen years ago. Under current law, they said, only the attorney general can lead a statewide investigative grand jury. This, they said, rendered invalid the decision by a Montgomery County Court judge to appoint lawyer Thomas E. Carluccio as a special prosecutor to investigate whether Kane illegally leaked secret material in an apparent bid to embarrass a critic.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, For The Inquirer
Tonya Bolden, a critically acclaimed author, still fondly remembers her "little book fair buddy," a young boy named Edward who refused to leave her side, year after year, at the African American Children's Book Fair when it first began in 1992. Edward has since grown up, but thousands of other children, parents, teachers, readers, and authors like Bolden keep visiting the fair. This year, the 23d African American Children's Book Fair will be held at the Community College of Philadelphia at 1 p.m. on Saturday.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Give credit to scrappy open-Internet advocates, Silicon Valley start-ups, and the everyday Internet users that HBO comedy-news host John Oliver summoned into an army of four million commenters to the Federal Communications Commission. Together, they turned the tide on one of the most arcane topics ever to stir the public: Net neutrality. With their help, the big story Thursday will likely be that FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler has moved to strengthen the agency's authority over broadband.
NEWS
February 1, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
You know a genre of music has become a deeply ingrained part of the culture when it becomes a featured night on American Idol . So it is with the American Songbook, a genre of music and a cultural movement that, beginning in the mid-1920s, defined American tastes in music, theater, movies, and even fashion for three decades. Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, and George Gershwin were its principal writers, and Ella Fitzgerald, Fred Astaire, Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, and Louis Armstrong the musicians and singers who interpreted their work.
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