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NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsbury, with its vaunted ground-and-pound offensive attack, has had some top-notch rushers over the years. Kervin Michaud, Jackson Fagan, and Brandon Pepper are a few of the ballcarriers who have stood out since Galen Snyder took over the program in 2002. This season, Charles Snorweah, with his quickness and strength, set a new standard while sparking the Falcons to a 13-2 record and their first PIAA District 1 Class AAAA title since 2006. The 5-foot-10, 175-pound senior dynamo, a threat to go the distance on every touch, carried 309 times for a single-season school record of 2,774 yards and 38 touchdowns.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The on-again, off-again reopening of the Franklin Square PATCO station is on again. The Delaware River Port Authority board on Wednesday approved $500,000 in the agency's 2015 capital budget to examine reopening the "ghost station," closed since 1979. The long-range DRPA budget estimates the total cost of reopening the station beneath Sixth and Race Streets at $12 million. No date was set for reopening it. The rebirth of the once-seedy Franklin Square park above the station and new development nearby has brought renewed bustle to the area and renewed interest in again using the station.
NEWS
December 2, 2014
WHEN TOM WOLF becomes governor next month, guess what changes will take place at the Philadelphia Parking Authority? None. Sorry, that's tough to take on a Monday. To supplement the bad news, let me offer a PPA primer for past, present and future victims. Think of this as a visit to the sausage factory. The reason there will be no changes: Although the governor appoints all six members of the PPA board, they get 10-year terms and none is up in the first four years of the Wolf administration (or regime, as Rush Limbaugh likes to say)
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
The live-in caregiver of an elderly East Frankford woman was being held on assault charges after the woman in her care was found starving, covered in filth, and suffering from festering, maggot-infested sores. She later died in what city prosecutors Monday called one of the most horrific cases of elder abuse their office has ever seen, and prosecutors are now weighing a murder charge. Plane Paciunas, 89, died Nov. 15, about a week after she was found "barely alive" in her living room, wrapped in a quilt on a bed covered with trash bags, prosecutors said in an interview Monday.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers voted unanimously Sunday to authorize a strike, which could take effect this year or early in 2015. The voting took place in a huge Columbus Boulevard meeting hall packed with hundreds of SEPTA union members. "There wasn't a nay in the room," said Willie Brown, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. "Members don't want to strike, but they are willing to fight for what we need. " Among the sticking points, he said, is a disagreement between the union and management about the size of pension fund contributions.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite a threat by the Philadelphia Parking Authority to impound cars and fine drivers, the low-cost UberX ride-sharing service began operating in the city Friday night. UberX, which runs in 110 cities across the country, is offering service free in Philadelphia this weekend "up to three trips, up to $20 each," said Uber Technologies spokesman Taylor Bennett. By midafternoon Saturday, the Uber app was showing "No UberXs available for Philadelphia. " "Demand is the through the roof," Bennett said.
NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA bus drivers, subway and trolley operators, and other transit workers will vote Sunday afternoon on authorizing a strike this year or early next year. No strike appears imminent, said officials for the union and the transit authority. Transport Workers Union Local 234 is the largest of SEPTA's 17 unions, representing about 5,000 drivers, operators, mechanics, cashiers, and other workers. They have been working without a contract since the previous five-year pacts expired in March and April, and union president Willie Brown has said a strike is all but certain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Use native plants or you're going to hell," is how Rick Darke recalls the native-plant message in the 1980s and '90s, when the movement was positioning itself yet again as the morally superior alternative to roses bred in China and "exotics," or nonnatives. Those all-or-nothing voices are still out there, but the narrative may be changing: You will hear less preachy imperative and defensive insistence that indigenous plants can be just as decorative as nonnatives, which are bred to be big-blossomed and colorful.
NEWS
October 14, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THREE DAYS in October will define the rest of Steven L. Pratt's life. The first day was Oct. 11, 1984, when Pratt was just 15 and put a bullet in his next-door neighbor's brain in Atlantic City after a fight his mother, Gwendolyn Pratt, had broken up earlier in their apartment there. The second day, Friday, held out hope for promise because Pratt was released from Bayside State Prison after serving almost exactly 30 years for that murder. But on the final day, yesterday, authorities say Pratt killed his mother.
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