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Autism

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NEWS
April 14, 2010 | By Amy Kelly
Autism is an extremely frustrating disorder. There is no known cause, no known cure, and no precise treatment once it's diagnosed. That's why the national symbol of autism is a puzzle piece: It truly is a puzzle. As a mother of three - two typical boys, who are 6 and 9 years old, and a daughter with autism, who is 8 - I live with autism's torturous puzzle every day. Not that there aren't as many rewards as there are frustrations, but when you live with autism, you live with the unknown and the uncontrollable.
NEWS
May 3, 2010
MY HEART goes out to letter-writer Charlene Wilsey, the woman with an autistic child. I have a beautiful 8-year-old grandson who is autistic. And you're right. There isn't enough education on autism. My daughter went to a march in Washington to try to make a difference in the lives of so many children with this growing affliction. It hurts me to see other children who can talk and do other things my grandson can't. There is still ignorance about autism. Sometimes when I have my grandson at the store or restaurant, he shouts or he might jump up and down, and the reaction from some people is unreal.
NEWS
January 26, 2004 | By Paddy Noyes FOR THE INQUIRER
Five-year-old Kyshawn has been diagnosed with autism, like one of every 500 children in this country. Fortunately, he has received services that have allowed him to blossom. Kyshawn attends a special-education program where, since there are just three students in the classroom, he receives a lot of individual attention. His school day includes physical, occupational and speech therapy. Although he still doesn't speak much, his verbal skills are improving. "He is able to let you know what he needs," his social worker says.
NEWS
April 1, 2004 | By Bob Holt
Many parents feel that the most beautiful thing about their child is a wide imagination. Whether he or she is pretending to be a cowboy, firefighter or superhero, when parents watch their child at play they realize that the potential is unlimited. Just imagine how you would feel if your child were suddenly shut off from that vast land of dreams and possibilities and simply retreated into his own world of solitary confinement. That's not imagination; that's the reality for parents of children with autism.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | By Amy Silverman, Special to The Inquirer
The successes and failures of several drugs used to treat autism in children were described to parents, researchers and teachers at a conference sponsored by the Devon-based Devereux Foundation. "We don't believe in anything, except in God, but we have to study drugs," Dr. Magda Campbell told about 200 people assembled Friday at the American College in Bryn Mawr. Campbell was among several speakers at the day- long conference on autism. Campbell, who works with autistic children at Bellvue Hospital in New York, discussed the test results of three drugs given to young children who have been diagnosed with the disorder.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Freelance
Autism has become a household word in America, in part due to extensive awareness efforts over the last several years and mainly because of the sheer magnitude of the autism health crisis in this country. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in every 88 children is now diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. If you don't personally know someone affected by autism yet, you probably will soon.   All of this awareness has been helpful in spurring research, focusing attention on the need for greater resources and services for people with autism, and helping to end the stigma long associated with this disorder.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Andrew Kitchenman, NJ SPOTLIGHT
Studying and treating autism poses daunting challenges - but the difficult task could made easier if researchers and health-care providers who work with autistic children coordinate their efforts. New Jersey officials and health-care leaders credited the new Montclair State University Autism Center for Excellence for emphasizing such an approach, as new grants were announced by the state council that funds autism research. The center, launched last year, encourages health-care providers and autism researchers to work together to speed up development of new treatments.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Parents in a community next door to Toms River think they have found another cluster - this time of autism, a childhood developmental problem with no clear cause. Federal agencies are investigating what parents say is an extremely high rate of autistic children in Brick Township - and whether the cases might have environmental roots. But the "autism cluster" theory faces some problems going in. First, federal health officials say environmental exposures have never been linked to autism.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | By Sherry Wolkoff
Jewish Family and Children's Service of Southern New Jersey and the Katz Jewish Community Center will sponsor their third annual community conference on autism and the lesser known Asperger's syndrome from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 18 at the center in Cherry Hill. The conference, open to the public, is in response to the growing number of requests for more information from individuals and families in South Jersey who are affected by these relatively unfamiliar disorders. Nearly six decades after autism was formally recognized, doctors still really don't know what causes it, how to prevent it, or how to cure it. We do know that autism is a developmental disability.
NEWS
March 12, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Danish scientist involved in two major studies that debunked any linkage of vaccines to autism is suspected of misappropriating $2 million in U.S. grants at his university in Denmark. Poul Thorsen, a medical doctor and Ph.D., was an adjunct professor at the Drexel University School of Public Health for several months before resigning Tuesday. On Jan. 22, Aarhus University said that it had uncovered a "considerable shortfall" in grant money from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for a research program that Thorsen had directed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2016 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Zahmir is an endearing 11-year-old with dark curly hair and big brown eyes. Fond of music, he delights in playing with his many musical toys. However, his interest in music goes beyond toys. He now enthusiastically plays the piano and looks forward to his weekly lessons. Other favorite pastimes include riding on his rocking horse and watching his favorite programs on television, including SpongeBob and a variety of shows on Animal Planet. He also enjoys playing outdoors, where he spends many happy hours digging in the dirt, rolling in the leaves, and running around.
NEWS
August 2, 2016
Suzanne Wright, 69, a cofounder of the advocacy group Autism Speaks, died of pancreatic cancer Friday at her home in Fairfield, Conn., an organization spokeswoman said. She helped build the group into one of the leading voices for people with the developmental disorder. She and her husband, former NBC Universal CEO Bob Wright, founded Autism Speaks in 2005 after their grandson's diagnosis. The New York-based organization funds research, raises awareness, and spotlights the needs of people with autism and their families.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
More children are being diagnosed with and treated for autism spectrum disorder due to state mandates requiring commercial health insurers to provide services to these children, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. Still, they found, far too few children who need help are getting it. The study results were published Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. Researchers found that from January 2008 to December 2012, states that required private insurers to cover care had higher rates of diagnoses: 1.8 per 1,000 children, on average, as opposed to 1.6 per 1,000 in states without a mandate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
_ VH1 HIP HOP HONORS: ALL HAIL THE QUEENS. 9 p.m. Monday, VH1. Awards show returns after a six-year absence, with an emphasis this year on rap's female players. Philadelphia's Eve (above) hosts and honorees include Queen Latifah, Missy Elliott, Lil' Kim and Salt-N-Pepa. _ MAYA & MARTY. 10 p.m. Tuesday, NBC10. Maya & Marty. 10 p.m. Tuesday, NBC. South Jersey's Kelly Ripa will be interviewed by Martin Short's Jiminy Glick in the season finale of the summer variety show. Other guests include Steve Martin, Emma Stone and Sean Hayes.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I wrote you more than four years ago about my energetic young boys, 4 and 6, one of them with autism, and my critical mother-in-law, "Milly. " After I wrote that letter in 2011, Milly continued to criticize our parenting (a lot) whenever we visited. I asked her again (politely) to please stop. She apologized (again), but went back to criticizing the next time we saw her. My husband and I decided it was too draining to spend so much time with her, so we cut back on frequency and length of visits.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
An online project aims to gather DNA and other information from 50,000 people with autism and their family members. Though the cause of the social communication disorder is unknown and believed to be a mix of environmental and genetic factors, scientists have identified 50 to 70 genes that may play a role in the condition. Some estimate that a total of 350 or more could be involved. The long-term study involves researchers from more than 21 medical institutions; find information at sparkforautism.org.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Rita Giordano, Staff Writer
Officers with the Camden County Police Department on Thursday became the first to take part in a yearlong effort to train law enforcers how to deal effectively and safely with situations involving people on the autism spectrum. The training is being offered by Bancroft, a nonprofit based in South Jersey that provides specialized services for individuals with brain injuries, autism, and intellectual disabilities. While officers with the county force were the initial trainees, Bancroft officials say they have invited departments from the 15 communities the organization serves to learn how to de-escalate budding problems and foster better understanding.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
'Give me a broken system, and I see the problem really easily," says Mark Jessen , a Palo Alto, Calif.-based IT technology consultant for global business-software maker SAP , on a visit last week to the company's North America headquarters in Newtown Square. Jessen is one of 100 people SAP has hired in its Autism at Work program since 2012. The first few hires were in India. SAP says it has developed supports to help autistic people cope with office demands they may find stressful, so they can apply their abilities to fixing software errors and other tasks.
NEWS
February 21, 2016 | By Shefali Luthra, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Sparking strong reaction from doctors and child-development experts, an influential task force says there's insufficient evidence to argue definitely that the benefits of screening all young children for autism outweigh the harms. "There's not enough evidence for us to recommend for or against screening in children for autism under 30 months," said David Grossman, a Seattle pediatrician who is vice chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. "Clinicians need to make a judgment on their own about whether to screen.
NEWS
February 20, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
After years of chronicling the dismal outcomes for people with autism who have grown too old for school-based services, Paul Shattuck grew frustrated at how slowly things were changing. The Drexel University researcher approached leaders at the school about a more active approach. This week, Drexel announced that it had received an anonymous $3.5 million donation from a family foundation to develop and evaluate ways to help young people with autism transition into the adult world of work or college.
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