CollectionsAutism
IN THE NEWS

Autism

NEWS
January 13, 2003 | By Susan FitzGerald INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major new government study has found a much higher prevalence of autism than studies done in the 1980s and early 1990s. The findings, though, still don't answer an important question: Is autism truly on the rise? Anecdotal reports from schools, doctors, service agencies and parent groups suggest a dramatic increase in children with the neurological disorder. But some experts say that could simply be a result of growing awareness of the condition: More children are being diagnosed because more people know about it. The new study, done in the Atlanta area, found that 34 of every 10,000 children had autism or a related condition - compared with a rate of 4 to 5 per 10,000 reported in previous studies conducted elsewhere in the last two decades.
NEWS
September 16, 2005 | By Wendy Ruderman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gloucester County now has the land, the financing and the blueprint for a new $14 million school for students with autism. If all goes as planned, freeholders announced yesterday, about 140 students - ages 3 to 21, most with autism - will enter the Deptford facility in fall 2007. For the first time since it was proposed in the spring, freeholders provided details about how and when the 46,200-square-foot school will take shape. "We are going to build the type of facility that will give these type of children the maximum opportunity to learn," Freeholder Director Stephen Sweeney said during a news conference in Washington Township.
NEWS
March 25, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
If you're the parent of a child with autism, it's hard to go places where the entire family can have fun without being worried about the child's behavior and other people's reactions. Autism is a developmental disorder that affects verbal and nonverbal communication skills and social skills. But the Garden State Discovery Museum in Cherry Hill is undaunted. Four times a year, the museum's Open Arms program invites families with autistic children for a free night of fun and learning - and networking with other parents and resource groups.
NEWS
April 20, 2008 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine for a moment that you're an autistic child. You have trouble processing the sights and sounds obvious to other youngsters. Shades of meaning and facial expressions that others use to navigate social situations are lost on you. With no way to manage unstructured time, your anxiety skyrockets. You might even throw a tantrum. "It's as if someone dropped you off in Tokyo, with only the street signs to go on," autism expert Judy Horrocks said. "After a while, if it's too overwhelming, you don't bother to look at the street signs anymore.
NEWS
February 22, 2009 | By Cynthia Henry INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Betsy Smetona of Haddon Heights quit her job last summer to stay home with her children. Her 23-year-old twins, Megan and Michael, have graduated from the Bancroft School in Haddonfield and can't be left alone. Both have autism, although in different degrees. "It's a big shock to the system when they graduate," Smetona said. "Their schooling was everything to them. It met their social and extracurricular needs. It's hard to find something in the community for Michael and Megan to do. " For the Smetonas and other New Jersey families in a similar situation, help could be on the way. Gov. Corzine signed laws in 2007 and 2008 that are now taking effect to enable early diagnosis of autism, develop screening guidelines for physicians, create a statewide patient registry, and educate emergency responders to recognize developmental disabilities.
NEWS
January 15, 2009 | By John Timpane INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When news came that Temple Grandin was coming to my house for an interview, I was scared. Grandin was coming to discuss her new book, Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals, which continues her quest to explain animals to people and people to themselves. She had been giving a reading nearby, in New Jersey, and said, why not? She is perhaps the best-known person with autism in the United States. Even without that distinction, hers is a singular story: Ph.D.
NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John T. Neisworth, a professor emeritus at Pennsylvania State University and a prominent authority on autism and early-childhood education, has been charged with 25 counts of child sexual abuse and is scheduled to stand trial in a Maryland courtroom April 19. Neisworth, 67, retired from his full-time professorship in 2002, but he continues to teach a distance-education course on behavior analysis through the university's outreach program, Penn...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
PHILLY-BORN AND -RAISED comedian Craig Shoemaker is retiring from the stage for good. But for his next trick, he'll bring a little Philly to the West Coast. "I've decided to say goodbye to my stand-up career and move on to more purposeful things," Shoemaker said. Before he says goodbye to the bright lights once and for all, Shoemaker will play two shows (one is sold out) at the Sellersville Theater on Saturday. So what are these purposeful things Shoemaker speaks of? The L.A.-based comic will open three locations of Tony Luke's in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2010
9 tonight COMEDY Jon Stewart hosts this special fund-raiser for autism. It includes sketches, short films and performances by Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Tina Fey, Jimmy Fallon, Ricky Gervais, Sarah Silverman and Chris Rock (right), among many others.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question : A friend of mine advised me not to give my baby the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine because of a link between it and autism. My nephew is autistic, and I don't want to do anything that might cause harm to my son. What advice can you give me on this difficult decision? Answer: Rest assured that the vaccine is safe. The MMR vaccine will protect your son against three serious infectious diseases, and will not cause him to develop autism. The controversy came about as a result of a 1998 research study published in the prestigious British journal The Lancet citing a new syndrome of autism and an inflammatory bowel condition in 12 children who had recently received the MMR vaccine.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|