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Auto Mechanic

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NEWS
September 16, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Bailey McBurnette Sr., an ace auto mechanic who was still advising on how to fix cars until two weeks ago, died Sunday. He was 82 and lived in the Elmwood section of Southwest Philadelphia. Born in Leesville, S.C., McBurnette dropped out of school at 11 to help support his large family. He came to Philadelphia in 1929 and began what would be a lifelong career as an auto mechanic. He worked for Pollow Chevrolet, Yellow Cab Co. and the Hog Island Lumber Co., and then became an auto mechanic supervisor for the U.S. Postal Service.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK TORPEY JR. had a busy life, as a carpenter and auto mechanic, not to mention husband and father of four - but his first love was music. More specifically, singing. Frank was a tenor who sang with local doo-wop groups, some that cut a few records that got local airplay, and were featured on Jerry Blavat's former TV show and with Georgie Woods on Channel 17. He was also a Navy veteran of the Vietnam War and was rated 100 percent disabled due to a back injury and exposure to Agent Orange while serving in Vietnam.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CLARENCE QUEEN was a man of many talents. He could restore an antique car, remodel a house, sing professionally and make unique sculptures that won prizes. Clarence used his knowledge of auto mechanics and auto restoration to create sculptures out of auto parts and other discarded material, which were exhibited in Philadelphia and New York City galleries. "I fell in love with his art when I first saw it," said Marilyn Kai Jewett, who worked with Clarence to promote his art. "I had never seen anything like it. Clarence was a very unique sculptor.
NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
At the moment, the only sound in Patrice Banks' auto repair shop in Upper Darby is the click of her trademark strappy red heels across the floor. Soon, though, if her plan pans out, the place will resound with revving engines, lug-nut guns, and blow dryers, while in the air the scents of 10W-30 motor oil and fresh nail polish commingle. Garages, almost always, are shrines to the Y chromosome. But Banks' vision for the Girls Auto Clinic and So Clutch Beauty Bar is XX: car care for women, by women.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | BY LARRY MCMULLEN
Sixteen-year-old Nicole Siligrini was sobbing last night for her brother, Anthony, who was lying in a room in the trauma center at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where he was being prepared for his seventh operation in the last 10 days. Nicole, a student at St. Maria Goretti High School, had just come from visiting with Anthony. She had been asked to be brave for her brother. "She didn't cry in front of him," said Nicole's mother, Linda Siligrini, as she cradled her daughter in her arms to comfort her. An aunt was kneeling on the floor in the waiting room, praying aloud to God to spare her nephew.
NEWS
June 27, 1999 | By Barbara Boyer, Oshrat Carmiel and John Way Jennings, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
James D. Gunning was a friendly, outgoing man, neighbors said. He held a job for more than six years as an auto mechanic in Feasterville. And he and his wife of six months seemed happy in their new Huntingdon Valley home. By all appearances, Gunning's life was going well until last month, when he was charged with aggravated assault in Mercer County. Then authorities upgraded it to attempted murder as police said they began uncovering a completely different side of Gunning. Authorities charged him last week with two other attempted murders in Camden County and said he was a suspect in the killings of 10 young blonde women in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York, all of them thought to be prostitutes.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Brenda J. Payton Hill, singer and producer, died Sunday. She was 46 and lived in the city's Germantown section. Raised in North Philadelphia, Hill started singing at the age of 5 in the choir of Polite Temple Baptist Church. By age 14, she was singing with the group, The Joylets. The family said she was discovered by Deejay Georgie Woods and through the 1960s and 1970s, Brenda and the Tabulations recorded records such as "The Touch of You," "Where There's A Will, There's A Way," and "It Was Right On The Tip Of My Tongue.
NEWS
May 8, 1998 | by Tom Schmidt and Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writers
Alfonso Cruz had made a new life for himself, as a family man and auto mechanic, in Paterson, N.J. He was working at his job at a Goodyear Service Center there yesterday when FBI agents arrested him as a fugitive in the slaying 20 years ago of a South Philadelphia woman, Mary Dupoldt. Philadelphia police said Cruz fell victim to the computer age. A police spokesman said investigators, who had a couple of boxes filled with information on Cruz, scanned the name of the fugitive through a new software package called Fast Track, and found that he worked at the service center.
NEWS
August 10, 2011
A Gloucester County man has been charged with stealing more than $22,000 from the Clayton Little League while serving as its treasurer, officials announced Wednesday. Joseph A. Schlosser, 47, of Clayton, was charged with third-degree theft. The money was taken over two years, according to the county Prosecutor's Office. Schlosser was arrested late Tuesday after a two-month investigation. The missing funds came to light in late spring after vendors reported nonpayment of bills and bounced checks.
NEWS
May 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Angelo J. Pennacchia, 85, of Springfield, Delaware County, a mechanic and decorated World War II Army veteran, died of renal cell cancer Wednesday, May 18, at home. Mr. Pennacchia grew up in West Philadelphia and trained as an auto mechanic. During World War II, he drove tanks and motorcycles in the 773d Tank Destroyer Battalion under Gen. George S. Patton's command in northern France and central Europe. He was wounded during the Battle of the Bulge and was awarded a Purple Heart.
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NEWS
August 15, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella, Staff Writer
At the moment, the only sound in Patrice Banks' auto repair shop in Upper Darby is the click of her trademark strappy red heels across the floor. Soon, though, if her plan pans out, the place will resound with revving engines, lug-nut guns, and blow dryers, while in the air the scents of 10W-30 motor oil and fresh nail polish commingle. Garages, almost always, are shrines to the Y chromosome. But Banks' vision for the Girls Auto Clinic and So Clutch Beauty Bar is XX: car care for women, by women.
NEWS
June 8, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Funeral services will be held Wednesday, June 8, for Hubert Joseph "Bud" DiGiacomo, 90, a retired Navy Reserve officer and Philadelphia Water Department foreman, who died Saturday, May 28. Mr. DiGiacomo, of Rhawnhurst, died of complications of Alzheimer's disease at St. John Neumann Nursing Home on Roosevelt Boulevard. Born and reared in Kensington, Mr. DiGiacomo attended Ascension of Our Lord grade school and Northeast Catholic High School for Boys. He left high school in September 1943 to join the Navy and fight in World War II. After training at boot camp in Sampson, N.Y., he was deployed to New Orleans in 1944 to serve as a motor machinist's mate aboard the LCT-742 (a landing craft for tanks)
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
SURROUNDED BY FAMILY in her Plymouth Meeting living room, Dara Arline puffed on a Newport and talked about the coping skills she wishes she had. "I think about him at least 20, 30 times a day because he was such a gentle spirit," she said. "None of my children have ever been in a fistfight. He was never suspended from school. . . . " That gentle spirit - her oldest child, Shakoor Arline - died in the most violent way, in a lurid and still-unsolved slaying early last Nov. 6. That's when someone pumped a barrage of bullets into him and Lisa Smith, the woman he was with, in an SUV parked near Lemon Hill Mansion in Fairmount Park.
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HOW MANY PEOPLE living in North Philadelphia knew they were living with royalty? They might have known their neighbors as Franklin and Elvira Gibson, but to the people of Ghana, they were Nana Kofi Yeboah II and Queen Mother Nana Akosua Akyaamaah. The couple had been "enstooled" by the people of Bosofour, Ghana, in 2000, which means they were given the titles of royalty for the many services they rendered to the West African nation. The impressive ceremony had the couple seated on elaborately carved wooden stools while the incantations were entoned.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CLARENCE QUEEN was a man of many talents. He could restore an antique car, remodel a house, sing professionally and make unique sculptures that won prizes. Clarence used his knowledge of auto mechanics and auto restoration to create sculptures out of auto parts and other discarded material, which were exhibited in Philadelphia and New York City galleries. "I fell in love with his art when I first saw it," said Marilyn Kai Jewett, who worked with Clarence to promote his art. "I had never seen anything like it. Clarence was a very unique sculptor.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The legal problems just keep mounting for reputed mob associate Ronald Galati Sr. Already under arrest in a murder-for-hire plot in Philadelphia, and under scrutiny from a Pennsylvania grand jury probing insurance fraud, the 63-year-old auto mechanic now faces federal charges alleging that he offered to pay three men to kill the boyfriend of his daughter Tiffany, 33. In an indictment unsealed Thursday, federal prosecutors in Camden accused Galati...
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA A Southwest Philadelphia auto mechanic who admitted killing a SEPTA trolley driver on orders of the driver's jilted girlfriend was sentenced Wednesday to 30 to 60 years in prison. Miguel Gonzalez, 39, said nothing before Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Benjamin Lerner sentenced him in the May 31, 2012, shooting of Aaron Hayes Sr. The sentence was negotiated by Assistant District Attorney Gail Fairman and defense attorneys Susan Ricci and Francis Carmen as part of Gonzalez's guilty plea to third-degree murder and conspiracy.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the next year or so, a car or truck dealership somewhere is going to be very happy to see Jillian Lukatchik, now 20, walking in the door. "You know you are going to be working your butt off," Lukatchik said cheerfully. She's on the road to graduate from the Universal Technical Institute (UTI) in Exton with a specialty in Cummins engines for diesel trucks. At the Philadelphia Auto Show at the Convention Center, it's all about the bling - the latest models, the latest engineering, the latest automotive loveliness.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FRANK TORPEY JR. had a busy life, as a carpenter and auto mechanic, not to mention husband and father of four - but his first love was music. More specifically, singing. Frank was a tenor who sang with local doo-wop groups, some that cut a few records that got local airplay, and were featured on Jerry Blavat's former TV show and with Georgie Woods on Channel 17. He was also a Navy veteran of the Vietnam War and was rated 100 percent disabled due to a back injury and exposure to Agent Orange while serving in Vietnam.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Keleshian, 90, of Broomall, a World War II gunner who received the coveted French Legion of Honor 67 years after seeing action in the skies over Europe, died Tuesday, Feb. 26, of respiratory failure at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Last February, during ceremonies at the French Embassy in Washington, Mr. Keleshian was named one of 24 "chevaliers of the Legion of Honor," France's highest civilian award, said his daughter Janice M. The medal, reserved for U.S. servicemen who helped liberate France from the Nazis, is similar to the U.S. Medal of Honor.
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