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NEWS
January 9, 1993 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Four years after Sears, Roebuck & Co. said it planned to close its Northeast Philadelphia distribution center, there may at last be a buyer for part of the landmark Roosevelt Boulevard site. Government officials confirmed yesterday they are working with a local privately owned employer, Cardone Industries Inc., to push a deal through. Cardone, a remanufacturer of auto parts in Philadelphia, has its main plant at Rising Sun and Adams avenues in Northeast Philadelphia. The 120-acre former Sears site at Adams Avenue, for 70 years a regional distribution center for the retailer, has been on the market since 1989.
NEWS
October 22, 1994 | By Daniel Rubin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Michael Cardone Sr., 78, a coal miner's son who came to Philadelphia in 1934 as a mechanic and built an auto parts company into the city's largest private manufacturer, died Wednesday in his Huntingdon Valley home. Cardone Industries, whose products are distributed under the name A-1 Remanufacturing, employs more than 2,200 people at several sites in North and Northeast Philadelphia. "A real Horatio Alger story," said Common Pleas Court Judge Joseph C. Bruno, who knew Mr. Cardone for 58 years.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edgar Rose, 90, who overcame the odds during the Great Depression and started an auto retail supply business that flourished with a successful chain of stores, died of respiratory failure Wednesday at Lankenau Hospital. He lived in Lower Merion. Mr. Rose had completed four years of a five-year engineering program at Drexel University when he was forced to leave school in the early 1930s to help his family financially. He had paid his way at Drexel by managing a garage owned by his father, Harry, at Eighth and Vine Streets in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 19, 2001 | by Dana DiFilippo, Daily News Staff Writer
Police raided a Southwest Philadelphia junkyard Wednesday morning and discovered more than $100,000 in alleged stolen-car parts. Police immediately ordered Little Frankie's Salvage Yard closed. Cops spent yesterday - and likely most of today - taking inventory of the 9.3-acre yard for more stolen goods. No arrests were made, but police are investigating who owns the yard, on Essington Avenue near Passyunk, and how much the owners and operators knew about the stolen-parts' origin, said Sgt. Fritz Brennan, of the major-crimes division's auto squad.
NEWS
December 8, 1990 | By Cheryl W. Thompson, Los Angeles Daily News
The FBI confiscated $50 million in counterfeit auto parts and accessories in a series of raids in 15 states, officials announced. Other than seizures related to drugs, this was the biggest such operation in FBI history, agents said yesterday. The seizure of the parts is the culmination of a three-year undercover investigation called "Operation Partsman," which looked into the manufacturing, importation and distribution of the bogus parts, said Lawrence Lawler, a special agent with the FBI's Los Angeles office.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1986 | By Ken Fireman, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Japanese government yesterday agreed to hold a new round of trade talks with U.S. officials this year that could increase the shipment of American auto parts and other transportation equipment to Japan, State Department officials said. They said the talks, which could begin as early as next month, will focus on reducing trade barriers in two areas: the sale of U.S. parts to Japanese automakers for use in new cars and the "after-sale" used-car-parts market. State Department officials said the talks were most likely to produce progress in the used-car-parts market because the biggest barrier there is the behavior of government-employed vehicle inspectors, who often reject any car with parts not made by the original manufacturer.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Stephen Mosteller reported for his usual 7 a.m. shift one November day in 1991 at Lignotock Corp., a Mount Holly auto parts supplier, he did not know that his whole approach to manufacturing was about to be transformed. Three executives from Toyota's North American headquarters in Georgetown, Ky., also showed up for the morning shift. They were invited by Lignotock's senior management, which was eager to learn Toyota's manufacturing process before beginning production for a five-year contract.
NEWS
March 26, 2006 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Salsa music blares from a factory boom box as Akouvi Tokoni grabs a used Honda Civic distributor from a milk crate. The 32-year-old immigrant from Togo checks the metal casting to make sure that it can be rebuilt to the correct specifications. Satisfied that it can, she inserts bushings and seals, sprays the part with compressed air, and screws in wire harnesses before passing the partially built distributor to a coworker. By the end of Tokoni's shift, Cardone Industries Inc. will convert more than 1,500 used distributors into good-as-new parts ready to ship to wholesalers, repair shops and auto dealers across the country.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1995 | By Andrew Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Gas Works officials yesterday said the utility fired four employees after uncovering a "systematic" theft of auto parts from the company's garage. Officials at the city-owned utility were vague about the thefts, but said PGW lost material valued at "thousands of dollars" over several years. The case was referred to the District Attorney's Office. "Since the investigation is ongoing, all I will say at this time is that PGW will not tolerate theft, fraud or abuse in any part of the organization," said E. Talbot Briddell, PGW's general manager.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2003 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pep Boys, the national auto-parts retailer based in Philadelphia, has hired a paratrooper from Canada as its new chief executive officer. Lawrence N. Stevenson, who will replace retiring Pep Boys CEO Mitchell Leibovitz in late May, is a graduate of Canada's Royal Military College, a former member of the Canadian Airborne Regiment, a Harvard M.B.A., a former Bain & Co. management consultant, and the builder of Canada's largest bookstore chain, Chapters Inc. "He really launched the big-box bookstore concept here in Canada," said Richard Talbot, president of Talbot Consultants International Inc., a retail consulting firm in Toronto.
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NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Franny and Jerry Weinstein were struggling to make a living selling auto parts during the great gas crisis of 1979 when the Nike swoosh changed everything. The couple had tried peddling a few close-out-brand athletic shoes to help shore up their bottom line, and before long, the Weinsteins' Automotive City gave way to a sneaker nation. "Nike and Adidas were exploding the whole industry," Franny Weinstein, 65, said. "Our sneakers starting doing better than the auto parts. " Now, the Weinsteins have made another momentous business decision, not driven by an international oil embargo, but by local competition and the Internet.
NEWS
February 16, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Wednesday's arrest of 14 people linked to the apparent theft of $1 million worth of auto parts from the Bensalem Township School District over a decade, law enforcement and school officials are trying to understand how the situation went unchecked for so long. In particular, officials wonder how Jack Myers, the former business manager, who oversaw the district's $100 million annual budget, failed to recognize any financial malfeasance. Myers was charged with theft and misappropriation of government property.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | Howard Schneider, Washington Post
The United States and China filed dueling complaints at the World Trade Organization on Monday, sharpening what has become a steady trade skirmish even as the nations' leaders pledge to expand economic cooperation between the world's two largest economies. U.S. officials accuse China of giving hundreds of millions of dollars a year in subsidies to its auto parts makers in order to boost its own exports. "Export subsidies are prohibited under WTO rules because they are unfair and severely distort international trade," U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said in a statement.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2012 | By Tom Krisher, Associated Press
DETROIT - Auto sales are growing so fast that Detroit can barely keep up. Three years after the U.S. auto industry nearly collapsed, sales of cars and trucks are surging. Sales could exceed 14 million this year, above last year's 12.8 million. The result: Carmakers are adding shifts and hiring thousands of workers around the country. Carmakers and parts companies added more than 38,000 jobs last year, reaching a total of 717,000. And automakers have announced plans to add another 13,000 this year, mostly on night shifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2011 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
On Saturday, 12 world championship high-horsepowered monster trucks that weigh more than 5 tons each will jump 125 feet, soaring up to 35 feet in the air, as they compete at the Advance Auto Parts Monster Jam at Lincoln Financial Field. The trucks, which stand 12 feet tall and 12 feet wide, can travel up to 100 m.p.h. This year's drivers include world champions from the Monster Jam World Finals XII; Tom Meents, winner of the racing competition with his Maximum Destruction truck; and Jim Koehler, who won the freestyle competition driving a truck known as the Avenger.
NEWS
May 12, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a dreary weekday afternoon inside Tacony Billiards, coffee in styrofoam cups scents the air, along with the day's special of meatball sandwiches, as legends long retired from the working class sit along the sideline like crows on a fence, lying in wait, watching a tight game of one-pocket pool. The club, a former supermarket and discount-clothing store, sits solitary, a block from I-95 in the Northeast. With 46 tables, it has a reputation for bringing out the best of the best: wily onetime hustlers, lights-out players, and gentlemen of skill.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Toyota Motor Corp. said Friday that it would maintain output at half capacity in Japan from May 10 through June 3 because of a supply crunch for auto parts after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami disaster. The world's No. 1 automaker said it remained unclear when it would return to full production in Japan. Toyota spokeswoman Shiori Hashimoto said the company was struggling to obtain about 150 types of auto parts. The magnitude-9.0 earthquake and ensuing tsunami destroyed parts factories in northeastern Japan, causing severe supply shortages for Toyota and other automakers.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2011 | By Joe McDonald, Associated Press
BEIJING - A shortage of auto parts and other components after Japan's earthquake has stirred unease about two pillars of manufacturing: the country's role as a crucial link in the global supply chain, and the concept of "just in time" production. Manufacturers worldwide over the last two decades have slashed costs by adopting Japanese-style small inventories and close links to a tight circle of suppliers. But that left them without a cushion of raw materials to ride out disruptions, forcing factories as far away as Louisiana to close when the March 11 quake and tsunami battered Japanese producers.
NEWS
October 28, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, Amy Worden, and Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writers
STATE COLLEGE - Jobs. Jobs. Jobs. Using carefully chosen, symbolic venues, the two candidates for Pennsylvania's U.S. Senate seat spent Wednesday trying to persuade voters that they know what critical switches to throw to create jobs. Each also continued to blame his opponent for helping to put the nation in its current pickle. Republican Pat Toomey, a former three-term congressman from the Lehigh Valley, took his message to the industrial heart of Central Pennsylvania, addressing a Rotary Club luncheon in York.
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