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Autobiography

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NEWS
November 20, 1992 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
The paperback version of "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" has been No. 2 on the New York Times paperback best-seller list for two weeks. But for some local booksellers, the autobiography has been hot for a long time. Dawud Hakim, owner of Hakim's Bookstore in West Philadelphia, has been selling books on African and African-American history and culture for more than 30 years. For the last three, "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" has been big, he said. Similarly, Njeri, owner of My Solitude bookstore in Germantown, said the autobiography has sold well since she opened her business more than seven years ago. Most of her customers who ask for books about Malcolm X are teen-agers and young adults.
SPORTS
April 1, 2003 | Daily News Wire Services
Pete Rose is writing another autobiography. Baseball's career hits leader, who hopes commissioner Bud Selig will end his lifetime ban, has agreed to a deal with Rodale Inc., the company said yesterday. The book will be written with Rick Hill, and is scheduled for publication in March 2004. Rose's first autobiography, "Pete Rose: My Story," was issued by Macmillan Publishing Co. in 1989, 2 1/2 months after Rose agreed to the lifetime ban following an investigation of his gambling.
SPORTS
July 19, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Vick has an autobiography coming out in September, so the Eagles quarterback and his past crimes are back in the spotlight. Vick told USA Today that he knows dogfighting is a permanent part of his story. In one excerpt of the book posted online by USA Today, Vick writes that he grew immune to the violence and crime where he grew up, in Newport News, Va., and was more dedicated to learning dogfighting than he was to playing quarterback in Atlanta. "I became better at reading dogs than reading defenses.
NEWS
July 18, 1989 | By Alexis Moore, Inquirer Staff Writer Staff writer Ann Kolson, the Washington Post, Associated Press and People magazine contributed to this report
Former President Richard Nixon says his autobiography, due next spring, will be his most personal book yet and will detail his experience of resigning the presidency. Publishers Simon & Schuster would not disclose terms of the contract, but said it plans a first printing of at least 200,000 and a major marketing campaign. The book will recount Nixon's meetings with world leaders and give advice about running for office, winning and governing. His book earnings will go to the Nixon Library in Yorba Linda, Calif.
LIVING
June 17, 1993 | By Mike Capuzzo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, Reuters and the Washington Post
When Oprah Winfrey said she liked Marianne Williamson's book Return to Love, thousands of her fans ran out to buy a copy. When she gave an hour on her show to Robert James Waller's The Bridges of Madison County, bookstores ordered several hundred thousand more copies. Now Oprah says she doesn't like a book - her own. In a dramatic move that stunned the industry, Oprah on Tuesday canceled publication of her autobiography, Oprah, just three months before it was to go on sale. "I've never seen this before in all my years in publishing - someone with a major book like this, particularly an autobiography, withdrawing it so close to publication," said Arlene Friedman, editorial director of the Literary Guild and the Doubleday Book Club, which were set to make Oprah richer than she already is. Winfrey said in a statement that it would be premature to release her book this fall.
LIVING
September 12, 1999 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Be careful when reading Been There, Done That (St. Martin's Press, $24.95). You just might come away from it feeling a little more sympathetic toward Eddie Fisher. In his autobiography, Fisher humorously recounts his life from the moment when, as a 3-year-old in South Philadelphia, he opened his mouth and a golden sound came out - a sound that would lead to a spectacular career before marital woes and drugs led to an equally spectacular fall. Fisher, who also wrote a memoir in 1981, Eddie: My Life, My Loves, said in a recent interview that he had written the new book "because I wasn't satisfied with the first one. It didn't have a lot of humor.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | BY JACK McKINNEY
Shoppers Alert. This is the time of year when most of the Sunday newspapers devote their book review sections to holiday gift recommendations, encompassing just about every heading from art to zoology. But none to date has graced its autobiography category with what may well be the most important title of the year. It is "Long Walk to Freedom" by Nelson Mandela (Little, Brown - $24.95) Surely, there's not more merit in the narcissistic reminiscences of actor Marlon Brando or trifling recollections of a colonial childhood by British novelist Penelope Lively, to name just two who have made the lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1989 | By Sherryl Connelly, New York Daily News
In her autobiography, "Marlene," Marlene Dietrich writes with that Teutonic detachment that can, at times, imbue her screen presence with an almost comic element. First she becomes a star, almost against her will. Why do people go on so about her legs? Then, all that money. What does she need it for? And the jealousy. All the time, everyone is jealous, causing her no end of problems. Jacques Feyder, the French director, was so maddened by the green-eyed monster that just before she was to be filmed naked in a bathtub, he broke down and begged her forgiveness.
SPORTS
December 20, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
MIKE TYSON has snorted enough cocaine to line a football field. Snorted it before some fights, then used somebody else's clean urine to fool the testers. Brags about it in his new book. Snorted when he was happy, snorted when he was sad, which was most of the time. That makes him an addict. A recovering addict, because he is taking it one day at a time. Mike Tyson has been drinking since he was an infant. Cheap hooch, then. He says he prefers Hennessy's now, when he topples off the wagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1991 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The little girl was so entranced by her first trip to the theater that she refused to leave her seat when the production, The Merry Widow, was over. Her mother's pleading was to no avail. Finally, a well-meaning gentleman plucked the tyke from her seat and started to carry her out. "I won't leave!" she began to scream. "I won't leave the theater!" That little girl was Helen Hayes. "And of course," she quips in her autobiography, My Life in Three Acts, "I never did. " Who better to read the audio version (abridged to three hours, $15.95)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
IT'S OFTEN said that those who claim to remember the 1960s weren't there. Well, Bill Kreutzmann was there, and he does remember them - or at least some parts thereof. Others, he admitted during a recent phone call, needed some fact-checking during the writing of Deal: My Three Decades of Drumming, Dreams, and Drugs with the Grateful Dead , released last week by St. Martin's Press. "The research took a lot of time. [Co-author Benjy Eisen] had to research a lot of information that I gave him. Some information I gave out wasn't exactly [accurate]
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
AFTER playing larger-than-life characters like Red, queen of the kitchen in "Orange Is the New Black," and Admiral Janeway in "Star Trek: Voyager," actress Kate Mulgrew has taken on a new challenge - telling her life's story in her book, Born With Teeth: A Memoir (Little, Brown & Co.). "I'll be 60 years old at the end of this month," Mulgrew said in an interview with the Daily News . "For 40 years, I've been playing other characters. I've enjoyed it. I've loved it. I've been seriously committed to it. But there comes a moment, when it comes, to step out as one's self.
SPORTS
December 20, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Staff Writer
MIKE TYSON has snorted enough cocaine to line a football field. Snorted it before some fights, then used somebody else's clean urine to fool the testers. Brags about it in his new book. Snorted when he was happy, snorted when he was sad, which was most of the time. That makes him an addict. A recovering addict, because he is taking it one day at a time. Mike Tyson has been drinking since he was an infant. Cheap hooch, then. He says he prefers Hennessy's now, when he topples off the wagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
SEX, DRUGS and rock 'n' roll? Graham Nash wrote the book, and it's out today. Wild Tales (Crown Archetype) details almost five decades of debauchery and music by Nash and the three musicians he'll always be most closely associated with: David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Neil Young. The book is a most candid tell-all. Nash spares nothing and no one as he surveys his rags-to-riches journey from being a young survivor of the Nazis' World War II Blitzkrieg campaign against England to helping create the soundtrack of the baby-boom generation - first as a co-founder of the "British Invasion" band the Hollies, later with Crosby, Stills & Nash (and sometimes Young)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
DRUMROLL, PLEASE. Philly's own Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson , the Roots' resident drummer, is writing a book. Thompson announced Wednesday that Mo' Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove will be released June 18 by Grand Central Publishing. The book includes the Grammy-winning musician/producer's run-ins with "celebrities, idols and fellow artists," including Stevie Wonder , KISS and Jay-Z . It also tackles "some of the lates, the greats, the fakes and the true originals of the music world.
SPORTS
July 19, 2012 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Vick has an autobiography coming out in September, so the Eagles quarterback and his past crimes are back in the spotlight. Vick told USA Today that he knows dogfighting is a permanent part of his story. In one excerpt of the book posted online by USA Today, Vick writes that he grew immune to the violence and crime where he grew up, in Newport News, Va., and was more dedicated to learning dogfighting than he was to playing quarterback in Atlanta. "I became better at reading dogs than reading defenses.
SPORTS
April 27, 2012 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forty-four years after he and Tommie Smith shocked the world with their black-gloved salute on the awards podium at the Mexico City Olympics, John Carlos thought it was time to explain why, and The John Carlos Story was born. "I wrote the book to give my kids and my grandkids an overview of what it was all about from my mind and heart in terms of what I perceived was happening, not what was being written," Carlos, 66, said Thursday, sitting at a table at a gate of Franklin Field signing copies with the inscription, "We live to make history.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Publisher Barney Rosset, who introduced the country to countless political and avant-garde writers and risked prison and financial ruin to release such underground classics as Tropic of Cancer and Lady Chatterley's Lover, has died. He was 89. Rosset died at a Manhattan hospital Tuesday night, said Kelly Bowen, publicity manager for Algonquin Books, which is to publish Rosset's autobiography. Rosset had recently had heart surgery. As publisher of Grove Press, Rosset was a First Amendment crusader who helped overthrow 20th-century censorship laws in the United States and profoundly expanded the American reading experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2012 | By Nekesa Mumbi Moody, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Eight years after he died of prostate cancer, Johnny Ramone's autobiography is finally being published. Commando: The Autobiography of Johnny Ramone is set for release April 2 by Abrams Image. In an interview Tuesday, his widow, Linda, described the book as "kind of his last word that he knew would be out. " "It is a really powerful book because his whole life has gone before him and he knows it's going to come to an end, and he really needs to tell everybody what he's feeling inside, so that's what makes it so amazing," she added later.
NEWS
November 13, 2011
By Michael Ondaatje Knopf. 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Paula Marantz Cohen     Readers familiar with Michael Ondaatje's novel The English Patient , for which he won the Man Booker Prize in 1992, will know that the excellent, Oscar-winning film adaptation of the book fell short of the original. Any attempt to represent visually what Ondaatje accomplishes with words inevitably flattens and reduces the effect. His latest novel, The Cat's Table , once again demonstrates his masterful literary gift.
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