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Autonomy

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NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Raphael G. Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Even as Scotland's separatist leader kicked off his party's independence campaign Friday, he also floated a compromise option that would fall short of his cherished goal of full separation from the United Kingdom. It's a proposal that's been described as "Independence Lite" - something that would give Scots control of all their affairs except foreign policy and defense, which would still be run out of London. First Minister Alex Salmond, the leader of the Scottish National Party, gave an ambiguous endorsement.
NEWS
February 14, 1986 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The Republican-controlled General Assembly yesterday approved measures, strongly opposed by labor groups, that would give state colleges greater operating autonomy. The measures now go to the Democrat-controlled Senate, where labor leaders hope to find a more sympathetic audience for their concerns that faculty members would lose their civil-service protection if the bills became law. The legislation, sponsored by Assemblyman John Rocco (R., Camden), would grant the state's nine four-year colleges greater control over hiring and their financial affairs, which the state now controls.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Amy Thomson, Bloomberg News
Former Autonomy Corp. chief executive officer Mike Lynch said the claim by Hewlett-Packard Co. that more than $200 million in improperly recorded revenue led to a $5 billion write-down does not make sense. "After being ambushed by all this yesterday, I've had a chance to look at some of the things that they're saying. It just doesn't add up," Lynch said Wednesday. "HP is looking for scapegoats, and I'm afraid I'm not going to be one of those. " Hewlett-Packard recorded an $8.8 billion write-down Tuesday and said more than $5 billion stemmed from accounting irregularities at Autonomy, which it bought last year.
NEWS
October 2, 2011
Steven Bozza is director of the Respect Life Office at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia Throughout the existence of our nation, the right of every person to act according to his or her conscience has been written into federal and state laws and upheld by the courts. Our founders recognized that authentic freedom can only be achieved when the individual is able to actively pursue the truth and act in accord with the truth he or she has discovered. Thomas Jefferson wrote, "[N]
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | By Thomas Hine, INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Most people have no idea of what the Philadelphia Art Commission does. And many of those who do know dislike it intensely. Despite its name, the responsibilities of the Art Commission go far beyond art. The unpaid commission members, appointed by the mayor, are the chief guardians of the city's public realm. The commission reviews designs for all public construction, considers private buildings in certain important areas of the city, approves signs in Center City, and has a key role in regulating what happens on and above the city's sidewalks.
NEWS
April 5, 1999
Interview with Vojislav Kostunica, and Dragomir Acovic Last of two parts. E-mail keeps coming in from Belgrade. John Timpane, editor of the Commentary Page, continues his exchange with Vojislav Kostunica, head of Serbia's Democratic Party, and Dragomir Acovic, an architect living in Belgrade. John Timpane: How should the Kosovo situation have been handled? Vojislav Kostunica: There should have been some understanding of the core of the Kosovo issue. The Kosovo Albanians' struggle, political and armed alike, is not motivated by some deprivation of their rights, but rather an aspiration to their own state.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Hewlett-Packard Co.'s $9.7 billion acquisition of Autonomy Corp. seemed like a bad idea long before Tuesday's allegations of an accounting scandal made clear it was a deal that should never have happened. It's the latest in a cavalcade of costly blunders at HP. The Silicon Valley pioneer has squandered billions of dollars on ill-advised acquisitions, compounding the challenges it faces as it scrambles to adjust to a world shifting from PCs to smartphones and tablets.
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another autonomous region has been declared in Yugoslavia: Vahdet Buric's house and garden. The 36-year-old auto mechanic is leading the world's smallest separatist movement. He took the first step in April by holding a referendum in his living room. Turnout was high and, according to Buric, 100 percent of the eligible voters - he and his wife - favored autonomy from Bosnia-Herzegovina, the ethnically mixed republic in central Yugoslavia. Buric promptly declared himself president and appointed a government, including a minister for demilitarization.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | BY VALERY CHALIDZE, From the New York Times
There is a great danger that the old prison of nations, as the Soviet Union used to be called, may be transforming itself into a new prison with separate cells. The threat is growing that the new Soviet republics will be dictatorships that suppress minorities and abuse human rights. Internation battles are becoming the rule and not the exception. We should be careful about supporting the republic leaders - even if elected by the people. Sixty years after the start of World War II, people in the West are in danger of forgetting what a tragedy it is when rights are defined by blood or ethnicity.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
A story Tuesday misstated the current position of New Jersey State Sen. Donald Norcross (D., Camden) on a proposed merger between Rutgers-Camden and Rowan University. He favors giving the Camden campus greater autonomy within the Rutgers system but keeping it independent of Rowan. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
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SPORTS
August 9, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Drexel athletic director Eric Zillmer had no doubt Thursday's vote by the NCAA Division I board of directors would grant approval for the "Power Five" conferences to gain the autonomy to chart their own course. He also has no doubt this is the wrong course for college sports. He hopes schools override the vote, as Drexel plans to do. Zillmer believes the Big Ten, Pac-12, Southeastern Conference, Atlantic Coast Conference, and Big 12 are grabbing fistfuls of more power by hiding behind what Zillmer calls "their version of enhancing student welfare.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
By Patrick Basham and John Luik Tobacco users should be required to obtain a "smoker's license" to buy cigarettes. So argues the academic Simon Chapman in the journal PLOS Medicine. He envisions a "smart card" system that would allow the government to limit smokers' cigarette purchases and encourage them to quit. Licensing is the antitobacco movement's latest proposal to "denormalize" smoking - that is, to portray smoking as unacceptable and smokers as deviants. It confirms that public-health elites suffer from Mary Poppins Syndrome: They won't rest until we're all practically perfect in every way. This kind of paternalism assumes (incorrectly)
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Michael Liedtke, Associated Press
SAN FRANCISCO - Hewlett-Packard Co.'s $9.7 billion acquisition of Autonomy Corp. seemed like a bad idea long before Tuesday's allegations of an accounting scandal made clear it was a deal that should never have happened. It's the latest in a cavalcade of costly blunders at HP. The Silicon Valley pioneer has squandered billions of dollars on ill-advised acquisitions, compounding the challenges it faces as it scrambles to adjust to a world shifting from PCs to smartphones and tablets.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Amy Thomson, Bloomberg News
Former Autonomy Corp. chief executive officer Mike Lynch said the claim by Hewlett-Packard Co. that more than $200 million in improperly recorded revenue led to a $5 billion write-down does not make sense. "After being ambushed by all this yesterday, I've had a chance to look at some of the things that they're saying. It just doesn't add up," Lynch said Wednesday. "HP is looking for scapegoats, and I'm afraid I'm not going to be one of those. " Hewlett-Packard recorded an $8.8 billion write-down Tuesday and said more than $5 billion stemmed from accounting irregularities at Autonomy, which it bought last year.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
LIFE REALLY IS FULL of delicious ironies. For example, who would have thought that the governor of the most liberal state in the nation, one that is so blue you can't tell where the land ends and the Atlantic begins, gets tapped to deliver the keynote address at the Republican National Convention? And after digesting that fact, who would have imagined that the party that says it's all about women and their dignity and independence could choose to honor a string of men who have done nothing but disrespect us during their storied political careers?
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By James Osborne and Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University trustees on Monday supported legislation proposing an overhaul of higher education in New Jersey while also expressing concern over a joint governing board controlling Rowan and Rutgers-Camden. Following a more than two-hour meeting in Glassboro, the board issued a statement endorsing cooperation between the schools as long as the agreement retained "the individual autonomy of both institutions and their respective governing boards. " "It's a question of autonomy," university spokesman Joe Cardona said.
NEWS
March 28, 2012
A story Tuesday misstated the current position of New Jersey State Sen. Donald Norcross (D., Camden) on a proposed merger between Rutgers-Camden and Rowan University. He favors giving the Camden campus greater autonomy within the Rutgers system but keeping it independent of Rowan. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Carlos Valdez, Associated Press
LA PAZ, Bolivia - Bolivia's long-downtrodden indigenous majority adored President Evo Morales as he championed a new constitution that promised the nation's 36 ethnicities unprecedented autonomy. But three years after voters overwhelmingly approved that document, making poor, landlocked Bolivia a "plurinational" republic, the country's first indigenous president is under attack for essentially ignoring it. Lowlands Indians have quit his Movement Toward Socialism over his insistence, without seeking their consent, on building a road across a virgin jungle preserve and for forging ahead with natural-gas projects on their traditional lands.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - England and Scotland work "so much better together" than apart, British Prime Minister David Cameron said Thursday, as he appealed to Scots not to break up the United Kingdom by voting for independence. In a speech in Edinburgh before talks on the ground rules for a referendum, Cameron said Britain was "a warm and stable home that billions elsewhere envy" - and dangled the prospect of more autonomy for Scotland if it chose not to leave. "I believe in the United Kingdom," he said.
NEWS
October 23, 2011 | By Raphael G. Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - Even as Scotland's separatist leader kicked off his party's independence campaign Friday, he also floated a compromise option that would fall short of his cherished goal of full separation from the United Kingdom. It's a proposal that's been described as "Independence Lite" - something that would give Scots control of all their affairs except foreign policy and defense, which would still be run out of London. First Minister Alex Salmond, the leader of the Scottish National Party, gave an ambiguous endorsement.
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