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NEWS
January 8, 1989 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
You can do a lot with a little cloth. The right tie transforms a rumpled, patches-on-the-elbow corduroy jacket into a natty statement of "lived-in" haute-iness. The wrong one makes a fellow in a $2,000 hand-tailored Italian suit look like an escapee from Podunkville. Some snappy fabric can dress up an entire community, too: For the 1984 Olympics, Los Angeles sprouted thousands of pastel canvas banners flapping in the balmy breeze on street lamps and signposts from one end of the basin to the other.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Italian Market is in the final stages of a $3 million renovation, but the butchers and cheese makers on Ninth Street say you can hardly tell the difference. "I have people come in my store and say, 'What did they do?' " said a frustrated Charlie Cannuli, who sells beef, pork and chicken. "When you walk down the street in May of 1998, it doesn't look any different from May of '95. " The city has spent at least $1.2 million on new granite curbs, concrete-paved streets, and sewer and gas pipes in an effort to spruce up the historic open-air market and attract new customers.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1997 | GEORGE MILLER/ DAILY NEWS
Afia the baby elephant and an adult pachyderm from Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus stop by the Italian Market yesterday as occupants showed off the $2.5 million in improvements that have been made at the 120-year-old South Philadelphia landmark. A repaved street and new awnings are among the improvements that are being made.
SPORTS
May 21, 1992 | For The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
There will be shade and shelter on the horse show grounds, thanks to the work of John Whartnaby of Ehmke Manufacturers, which is providing awnings for the show. Visitors are urged to travel to the Devon area by public transit, if possible, as parking is limited.
NEWS
November 19, 1989 | By Lynda Macellaro, Special to The Inquirer
High winds that ripped awnings off of three trailers at Warren Snyder Elementary School last week prompted Bristol Borough school officials to evacuate 240 students from the school wing next to the trailers. The storm, which swept through Bucks County on Thursday, struck the trailers at 9:30 a.m., causing $2,500 in damage, Superintendent James McCool said at the Thursday night school board meeting. No injuries were reported and classes were able to continue, he said. After the evacuation, 10 parents removed their children from school for the day, said Warren Snyder Elementary School Principal John Girotti.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By Kathleen Martin Beans, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Gap, a San Bruno, Calif.-based clothing retailer, has filed plans with Doylestown Borough to take over the retail space now occupied by Woolworth's on Main Street. A combination Gap and Gap Kids store is planned. "We're sorry to see Woolworth's go," said Phil Ehlinger, borough code enforcement officer. "But we're happy to have them (the Gap) in. We're going to do everything we can to welcome them here. " Borough officials and merchants have expressed concern in recent months about Doylestown losing its viability as a retail center.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
The F.W. Woolworth Co. is coming to Upper Darby's 69th Street, developer Morris S. Willner said Tuesday. The new Woolworth will move into the store formerly occupied by S.S. Kresge Co., which closed Sept. 12 after Willner terminated the store's lease. Willner told a meeting of the 69th Street Revitalization Committee on Tuesday that Woolworth had agreed to completely renovate the store at 92 S. 69th St. and to open in time for Christmas. Kresge had declined to put any money into its store, he said.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Walked down South Ninth Street in the Italian Market lately? Notice the torn-up streets? The piles of trashed boxes? Maybe the odor? By next year, all are supposed to be gone. Instead, you should see a new concrete street, new sewers, new awnings, overhauled facades, and new sidewalks with granite curbs. With receipts down and suburban shoppers who ventured into South Philadelphia a decade ago becoming scarce, market merchants have decided they need to clean up their act. And maybe, just maybe, the regular customers will be back, and then some.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
A reputed drug kingpin who thinks so highly of himself that his name is emblazoned across the awnings of his North Philadelphia lair was locked up last night on charges he murdered a rival five years ago, police said. Steve Blount, 29, of Oakdale Street near 24th, surrendered to the police Homicide Division with his lawyer around 6 p.m. He awaits arraignment on charges of murder, conspiracy, criminal solicitation, intimidating witnesses and firearms violations. Police believe Blount masterminded a ruthless dope business in the 25th and Sergeant streets area for years.
NEWS
May 20, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
SCOTT DeGIRALOMO, owner of Computer Guy on Torresdale Avenue near Disston, said he's very happy with the new, huge "Computer Guy" letters that light up in cool blue across the former Tacony post office that now houses his high-tech services business. "They replaced my hanging disaster of an old sign outside that was about to fall and crush somebody," DeGiralomo said dryly. Like Bull's Eye Dart Supplies next door, Computer Guy is one of 15 businesses along Torresdale Avenue that got a major face-lift, thanks to the Tacony Community Development Corp.
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NEWS
May 20, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
SCOTT DeGIRALOMO, owner of Computer Guy on Torresdale Avenue near Disston, said he's very happy with the new, huge "Computer Guy" letters that light up in cool blue across the former Tacony post office that now houses his high-tech services business. "They replaced my hanging disaster of an old sign outside that was about to fall and crush somebody," DeGiralomo said dryly. Like Bull's Eye Dart Supplies next door, Computer Guy is one of 15 businesses along Torresdale Avenue that got a major face-lift, thanks to the Tacony Community Development Corp.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
BRADENTON, Fla. - Beyond the left-center field wall here at McKechnie Field, more than 375 feet away from home plate, sits a lovely set of bleachers shielded from the afternoon sun by three pine-green painted awnings. It would seem an excellent spot to snag a home-run ball during batting practice, provided the hitter doesn't rocket the ball so high and so far that it lands on top of one of the awnings, which is what Darin Ruf did Friday before the game. He did it with a swing so quick and fluid that it was easy to understand, in that single moment, why Phillies manager Ryne Sandberg has insisted on writing Ruf's name on the team's lineup card so often this spring.
NEWS
February 12, 2010 | By Darran Simon INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During many a summer, James Boles perched on a bar stool in Margate, N.J., holding an old mayonnaise jar. "How about a dollar for MS?" he'd ask patrons, helping his summer employer, Gilhooley's, raise money to fight multiple sclerosis in the 1980s and '90s. But the Riverside native ran his words together sometimes. Bar patrons heard: "How about a dollar for the Mets?" Either way, patrons gave. Yesterday, stunned family and friends had to deal with Boles' sudden death.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2002 | By Thomas J. Brady INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you gotta go, go in a Krass Bros. suit. So said Ben Krass, popping up out of a coffin, in a now legendary 10-second commercial for the menswear store that he and his brothers ran for about 50 years on South Street. Now, Ben Krass himself is about to go, surely in a Krass Bros. suit. Not to the afterlife but to life after running one of the more colorful stores in Philadelphia's merchandising history. The tag line on his commercials, for example, was, "If you didn't buy your clothes at Krass Bros.
REAL_ESTATE
September 3, 2000 | By James Dulley, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: I need a movable awning for sun and rain protection over my deck and windows in summer. I still want a sky view at night and passive solar heat in the winter. What is the best type of awning to use? - Paul N. Answer: There are several types of movable awnings available, but the most convenient for your needs is a lateral-arm retractable awning. It's easy to install, open and close, and it is very durable. The only support for a retractable awning is attached to the house wall, so you eliminate the inconvenience of having awning supports at the outer corners of the deck or patio.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | By Melanie Burney, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Another small piece of the city came tumbling down yesterday: A wooden porch awning of a North Philadelphia bar and restaurant fell to the sidewalk, injuring two passersby, police said. As the nearly 300-year-old city continues to show its age with the collapse of four buildings last week, work is scheduled to begin to identify and raze unstable structures. The city will start making aerial inspections Tuesday from a police helicopter in an attempt to spot seriously deteriorated buildings.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
James P. Horneff, 80, one of the pioneers in the development of clean-room technology, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at his Moorestown home. He had lived in Moorestown since 1977, and previously resided in Cherry Hill for 27 years. He was born and raised in Camden. Mr. Horneff held two patents for refinements to clean-room technology, which provides a room free of bacteria, viruses and dust. The patents were issued in 1968 and 1974. His efforts helped make clean rooms - used at the time primarily in atomic and electronics applications - "more portable and more affordable," said Roger Horneff, his son. Mr. Horneff sold the licensing rights to his patents to a firm and then handled marketing for the company.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | By Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer
Every morning, the woman shuffled along Allegheny Avenue in the shadow of the El, carrying plastic bags filled with the secrets of her lonely life. Under 5-feet tall with short wavy gray hair, the 77-year-old Polish immigrant would stop at the corner of Emerald Street to chat with Joe "Little Joey" Toughill while he did outdoor cleaning work. Most days, she got him coffee from a nearby Burger King. Stefe Wojtasinski picked up trash and swept the porch of a rooming house at the corner of Madison and Emerald streets where she lived for 10 years.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | By Tanyanika Samuels, INQUIRER SUBURBAN WRITER
Imagine the borough's Broadway lined with potted flowers, quaint cottage-style benches, and matching street lanterns. Those touches are part of the long-awaited vision for a new downtown. Consultants from two Philadelphia-based companies met with residents and council members Wednesday night to present plans to revitalize the borough's downtown district "so businesses can say, 'This is a place on the move; this is where we want to be,' " said consultant Joanne Amante, a planner with Triad Associates.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Italian Market is in the final stages of a $3 million renovation, but the butchers and cheese makers on Ninth Street say you can hardly tell the difference. "I have people come in my store and say, 'What did they do?' " said a frustrated Charlie Cannuli, who sells beef, pork and chicken. "When you walk down the street in May of 1998, it doesn't look any different from May of '95. " The city has spent at least $1.2 million on new granite curbs, concrete-paved streets, and sewer and gas pipes in an effort to spruce up the historic open-air market and attract new customers.
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