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Azaleas

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NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
It's hard to find a more colorful spot in Philadelphia in late April and early May than the grounds of Friends Hospital at 4601 Roosevelt Blvd. Thousands of azaleas are bright with blossoms. And the dogwoods are in bloom. Dale Nemec, the hospital's grounds coordinator, and his colleagues invite you to enjoy the blossoms at Friends this weekend and the first two weekends in May during the hospital's annual Azalea Days. The grounds will be open each weekend from 11 a.m to 5 p.m. and you can either drive through, or park and take a walk.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just two weeks ago, Purple Hill was brown. And so utterly dreary, it seemed impossible to imagine that, just two weeks from now, the hill behind the goldfish pond at Friends Hospital will awaken to spring with a spray of azaleas colored hazy pale lavender, bold rosy magenta and deep velvety violet. But they promised - David Liddle, director of the hospital's plant operations, and Dale Nemec, grounds supervisor. Every year for the last 49, this esteemed Quaker psychiatric hospital on Roosevelt Boulevard has opened its gates to the public in late April and early May for "Garden Days.
LIVING
June 14, 1987 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
Visit Alan Slack's home near Media this time of year and you will find a large number of pans covered with plastic and filled with cuttings. Over the years, Slack has propagated hundreds of plants this way, and he finds evergreen azaleas, which are best propagated from the end of May through June, among the easiest. The azaleas that will propagate best from cuttings, according to Slack, are many of the Hino series, in crimson, flame and white; Delaware Valley White, and Coral Bells, a pink.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
J. Blaine Bonham Jr. earns his living turning Philadelphia's blight into bloom. But earlier this week, even he had to marvel at the transformation of Fairmount Park's Azalea Garden. "It's looking splendiferous!" exclaimed Bonham, director of the Philadelphia Green and Center City Green programs for the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. He was surveying the near-complete renovation of the popular walking and wedding-picture spot behind the Philadelphia Museum of Art. On this day, it looked for all the world like an English country garden - soft spring sun overhead, fragrant grass clippings underfoot and fresh new flower beds all around, a blushing hint of the horticultural rainbow to come.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
While turning over the soil between her azalea bushes yesterday afternoon, Vickie Martorano of Cherry Hill unearthed a surprise: a live hand grenade. She and her husband, Robert, were cleaning away leaves and digging around the azaleas in front of their house in the 400 block of Third Avenue. He was taking a break. She was jumping on the shovel. "I hit something," she said. "I thought it was a tree stump. I flipped the shovel over and said to my husband, 'Hey, look, I found a grenade.
NEWS
October 27, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Harold Sweetman associates the smell of carnations with his childhood; he even learned to walk in a greenhouse. So it is fitting that Sweetman - who grew up on a farm in southern Colorado - should manage Jenkins Arboretum, a public garden almost hidden away off a busy suburban road in Devon. As he guides the arboretum into the 21st century, Sweetman, the site's executive director, is playing a central role in a $3 million silver-anniversary fund-raising campaign launched this year.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
On Mother's Day, the Gibat family strolled amid the azaleas at Friends Hospital in the Northeast. Helen Gibat (third from right), husband Harry (right) and some of their three children and six grandchildren admired the gardens before heading to her sister's house for dinner. Yesterday marked the end of the hospital's Garden Days, during which its 100-acre campus is open to visitors for azalea blooming season. Azaleas cover more than 20 acres.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | By Jane G. Pepper, Special to The Inquirer
July is an in-between month for the gardener, with a few leftover spring chores and the anticipation of the projects associated with the ripening of late-summer crops - tomatoes, eggplants and peppers that must be canned and frozen and made into soups and sauces. In the leftover-chores department, make this weekend the last to prune or fertilize shrubs, to avoid leaving new, unripened wood to face the frosts and biting winds of winter. It's a good time to trim hedges or to prune yews and junipers or Japanese hollies.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IT'S BEEN a while since the last celebrity sex-tape scandal, but hollywoodlife.com is reporting that folks at Vivid Entertainment are vetting a tape brought to their attention, allegedly starring "Fancy" rapper Iggy Azalea . Now she has 100 problems. Iggy's boyfriend, basketballer Nick Young , is not too happy about the news. "He hates it on so many levels," said a source. "If it is true, he doesn't believe that it is him in the video, he feels terrible for Iggy and what it would do to her career.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The shadows of our walking selves are huge and distorted, like giants moonwalking in a fun house. Who knew Jenkins Arboretum could be so entertaining on a mild afternoon in autumn? Its 46 acres are gently tucked into a residential neighborhood in Devon, not far from the Route 202 raceway, where everyone, it seems, considers speed limits optional. You can hear the traffic deep inside the garden, but the sound is nicely muffled, like the muted landscape of this quiet season and place.
TRAVEL
August 7, 2011 | By Mary Ann Anderson, McClatchy Newspapers
PINE MOUNTAIN, Ga. - Behind every garden is a story, and Callaway Gardens, atop the slopes of Georgia's Pine Mountain, is no different. The backstory is that Cason Callaway, a Georgia textile magnate turned gazillionaire, once said that every child should see something beautiful before he was 6 years old so he would remember it all his life. Callaway then carved out 2,500 acres from cotton farms he owned that had been eroded by poor farming practices and created Callaway Gardens, a beloved Georgia landmark threaded with woodlands, pastures, golf courses, and spectacular gardens that defy generalizations.
NEWS
June 18, 2010 | By Michael Martin Mills, Inquirer Columnist
Start deadheading, that is, removing spent flowers that are turning into seed pods. Lilacs and rhododendrons are much more presentable when deadheaded, and none of the shrub's energy is diverted to seed maturation. Columbine, Siberian iris and doronicum will self-sow if not deadheaded. Tall bearded iris stems invite rot and borers if not cut at the base. Repeated deadheading of annuals will keep them in blossoming mode, as opposed to seed-maturation mode. Fool your columbines into thinking it's 2011.
NEWS
March 19, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It might seem daunting to challenge yourself to ski on 80 days in the year you turn 80. But William F. Steele Jr. of Westtown did that, and more. "Last year, it was [on] the 93d day that he had his first skiing accident, ever, when we were at Squaw Valley" in California, his wife, Ellen, said. "He was going for 100" when he fractured his pelvis and two ribs, she said. On Feb. 21, Mr. Steele, 81, a Wilmington math teacher for more than 20 years and later an award-winning Chester County nurseryman, died of cancer at the Neighborhood Hospice in West Chester.
NEWS
April 12, 2009 | By Bill Lyon
If it goes as it almost always does, then round about sunset today, in the sweet-scented, shadow-streaked Georgia dusk, in a horseshoe amphitheater formed by an enormous gallery, one man, bathed in golden April light, will stroke the final putt and as the ball clatters into the cup he will leap in exultation, or punch holes in the heavens, or, as Gentleman Ben Crenshaw did, bend over and clasp his hands to his head and weep and later say to the assemblage:...
NEWS
May 7, 2004 | By Elizabeth McGinley
With their thousands of flowers, the resplendent azalea bushes in the gardens at the Art Museum and Friends Hospital are justly celebrated. My eyes, though, are just as attracted to their smaller cousins, humble in size but bold in color, that decorate my Northeast Philadelphia neighborhood. Trips to the cleaners, bank, and my childrens' activities lose their winter-gray sameness when I travel in a Technicolor-bright world of magenta, orange, pink, red and white. The azaleas add a special sheen to out-of-the-ordinary events.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the end of spring planting season, and homeowners have been busy landscaping with the usual assortment of Asian yew bushes, Japanese maples and exotic azaleas. It's enough to make Jim Plyler cringe. Plyler owns a nursery in Chester County that sells only plants native to the eastern United States. To Plyler, whose thick hands and fingers seem made for turning earth with a shovel, it makes no sense to put something in the ground unless it belongs. "Why put this crazy assemblage of plants together that doesn't relate to here?"
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | By Deborah Fries
The white azalea near the front door is blooming. After nine years in the region, I've come to expect a sequence of color in the rollout of a Delaware Valley spring. White is the last variety to open; lavender blooms first; hot red, pink, fuchsia and orange varieties flame out in between. Sprawling azaleas are preceded by tree-high waves of pale blossoms: red bud, weeping cherry, Japanese cherry, crabapple, magnolia, pink and white dogwood. A second wave washes in the purples of lilac, wisteria and paulownia.
NEWS
October 27, 2002 | By Susan Weidener INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Harold Sweetman associates the smell of carnations with his childhood; he even learned to walk in a greenhouse. So it is fitting that Sweetman - who grew up on a farm in southern Colorado - should manage Jenkins Arboretum, a public garden almost hidden away off a busy suburban road in Devon. As he guides the arboretum into the 21st century, Sweetman, the site's executive director, is playing a central role in a $3 million silver-anniversary fund-raising campaign launched this year.
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