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Azkaban

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NEWS
June 3, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What were stars Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson doing promoting Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban on TRL, MTV's teen mecca, last week? And why are theaters bursting out of the gates with showings of the film at midnight tonight? Isn't that a little past bedtime for Harry's young fans? The third film adapted from J. K. Rowling's fictional sorcery franchise is altering perceptions about the age of Harry Potter's audience. Apparently once the teen wizard casts his spell, you can't outgrow it. Kids who were in grade school or middle school when Pottermania broke (the initial book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, was published in 1998)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are many reasons why Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban is the best of the three Harry Potter pics to date: It's shorter (though not by enough), it seems less like a theme-park ride and more like a real movie, and its heroes (and several assorted rogues) are beginning to feel familiar, like old friends. It is also, happily, not directed by Chris Columbus. For all his fidelity to J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter universe, Columbus - the one-time protege of Steven Spielberg - never captured the soul of the books, just their special effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2002 | Los Angeles Daily News
As the second installment in the "Harry Potter" saga hits theaters today, here's a rundown on "Potter" films yet to come: _ "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" Due in theaters: Summer or fall 2004 (shooting begins in February 2003). The changes: Director Alfonso Cuaron ("Y Tu Mama Tambien," "A Little Princess") takes over for Chris Columbus, who, after helming the first two movies, remains on board as a producer. Richard Harris died last month, so another actor must be found to play the key role of Professor Dumbledore.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA Staff writer Ellen Gray and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HARRY POTTER tambien! The planets must have aligned in a cosmically creepy way over the weekend, prompting the announcement that the director of the much talked about sex flick "Y Tu Mama Tambien" has been chosen to helm "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban," the third movie in the popular franchise. Que que? Well, the news that the low-profile Mexican director Alfonso Cuaron will direct the flick, set for a summer '04 release, isn't totally out of left field. Cuaron directed the warm, touching, but little seen children's movie "A Little Princess" in the mid-'90s.
NEWS
August 1, 1999 | By Fawn Vrazo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Harry Potter is just a snippet of a scrawny boy, age 13, and, wizard though he is, he can't do a thing about his bad hair. But he certainly can make books fly. After scoring literary triumphs in England, the young sorcerer is on his way to even greater successes in the United States. And part of his fantastic appeal is due to the wizardry of the Internet. The third volume of his adventures - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban - became one of the fastest-selling novels in British history after its release two weeks ago, topping even the sales of its two predecessors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2011
Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson has reviewed all 8 Harry Potter films, awarding them grades as high as A ("Deathly Hollows Part Two") and as low as B- ("The Order of the Phoenix"). Here are excerpts from a decade of Potter punditry: HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE (2001): B "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" is loyal and faithful and true, and if movies were dogs, this would be best in show. The $125 million production doesn't preserve everything from J.K. Rowling's beloved book, but it preserves an impressive amount, so much that its legions of devoted young readers will scarcely experience a bump or jolt along the way. . . . What fans of the "Harry Potter" books love is the encounter with a work of inspiration, one that produces its own kind of magic.
NEWS
July 20, 2007 | By Heather Servaty-Seib
Death has hung over the Harry Potter series, just as it dominates much of popular entertainment, driving the plot of crime and forensics television shows, for instance. Who will die this time?, fans debated at home, camp, work - even online, during the buildup of J.K. Rowlings' final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, due for release tomorrow. Will Harry survive his final confrontation with Lord Voldemort? However, people are much less likely to talk about how death affects their personal lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA MTV.com, the New York Daily News and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FILE THIS in the-wacky-yet-true file. Wild rocker Courtney Love's breast implants have killed her beloved Pomeranian, the New York Post reported yesterday. And it's not what you think. Love purportedly had her implants removed "several years ago," the Post said, but since this is Courtney, ya think she discards her former friends? Nah! Girlfriend wants to keep them around, the New York tab says, as "souvenirs. " Bad idea. Her curious canine saw one of the implants as lunch and promptly keeled over from the nosh.
NEWS
July 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
"Ah, Harry, you need to shave, my friend," Dumbledore says to his Hogwarts protege Harry Potter. And indeed, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, puberty is in full bloom, addled adolescence all the rage. Slower and talkier than the five Potters that came before - but not necessarily in a bad way - Half-Blood Prince is a bubbling cauldron of hormonal angst, rife with romance and heartbreak, jealousy and longing. If it weren't for all the bearded wizards and whooshing Death Eater vapor trails, this could be just another modern-day high school melodrama.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A version of this review appeared in Tuesday's editions. 'Ah, Harry, you need to shave, my friend," Albus Dumbledore says to his Hogwarts proteg? Harry Potter. And, indeed, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, puberty is in full bloom, addled adolescence all the rage. Slower and talkier than the five Potters that came before - but not necessarily in a bad way - Half-Blood Prince is a bubbling cauldron of hormonal angst, rife with romance and heartbreak, jealousy and longing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2011
Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson has reviewed all 8 Harry Potter films, awarding them grades as high as A ("Deathly Hollows Part Two") and as low as B- ("The Order of the Phoenix"). Here are excerpts from a decade of Potter punditry: HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERER'S STONE (2001): B "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" is loyal and faithful and true, and if movies were dogs, this would be best in show. The $125 million production doesn't preserve everything from J.K. Rowling's beloved book, but it preserves an impressive amount, so much that its legions of devoted young readers will scarcely experience a bump or jolt along the way. . . . What fans of the "Harry Potter" books love is the encounter with a work of inspiration, one that produces its own kind of magic.
NEWS
July 10, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Friday marks the end of an era. Some, like Warner Bros. executive Dan Fellman, compare its finality to the breakup of the Beatles. When Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 , the eighth and presumably final film based on the phenom that has sold 450 million books and close to a billion movie tickets, opens this week in theaters from Lahore to Los Angeles, it will be twilight in the Potterverse. No more pajama-clad kids lining up at midnight to buy the new Harry volume.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A version of this review appeared in Tuesday's editions. 'Ah, Harry, you need to shave, my friend," Albus Dumbledore says to his Hogwarts proteg? Harry Potter. And, indeed, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, puberty is in full bloom, addled adolescence all the rage. Slower and talkier than the five Potters that came before - but not necessarily in a bad way - Half-Blood Prince is a bubbling cauldron of hormonal angst, rife with romance and heartbreak, jealousy and longing.
NEWS
July 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
"Ah, Harry, you need to shave, my friend," Dumbledore says to his Hogwarts protege Harry Potter. And indeed, in Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, puberty is in full bloom, addled adolescence all the rage. Slower and talkier than the five Potters that came before - but not necessarily in a bad way - Half-Blood Prince is a bubbling cauldron of hormonal angst, rife with romance and heartbreak, jealousy and longing. If it weren't for all the bearded wizards and whooshing Death Eater vapor trails, this could be just another modern-day high school melodrama.
NEWS
July 20, 2007 | By Heather Servaty-Seib
Death has hung over the Harry Potter series, just as it dominates much of popular entertainment, driving the plot of crime and forensics television shows, for instance. Who will die this time?, fans debated at home, camp, work - even online, during the buildup of J.K. Rowlings' final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, due for release tomorrow. Will Harry survive his final confrontation with Lord Voldemort? However, people are much less likely to talk about how death affects their personal lives.
NEWS
February 26, 2006 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What's the best way to raise America's international profile? It's simple, dude: Export desperation . . . of the Housewives sort. In an ambitious cultural project, Disney plans to produce four local Latin American editions of ABC's mega-popular Golden Globe-winning sexy-smart-and-soapy dramedy Desperate Housewives, each with its own cast. Three Spanish-language versions will be shown in Argentina, Colombia and Ecuador, while a Portuguese one will air in Brazil. Why four and not, say, two?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2004 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are many reasons why Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban is the best of the three Harry Potter pics to date: It's shorter (though not by enough), it seems less like a theme-park ride and more like a real movie, and its heroes (and several assorted rogues) are beginning to feel familiar, like old friends. It is also, happily, not directed by Chris Columbus. For all his fidelity to J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter universe, Columbus - the one-time protege of Steven Spielberg - never captured the soul of the books, just their special effects.
NEWS
June 3, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What were stars Daniel Radcliffe and Emma Watson doing promoting Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban on TRL, MTV's teen mecca, last week? And why are theaters bursting out of the gates with showings of the film at midnight tonight? Isn't that a little past bedtime for Harry's young fans? The third film adapted from J. K. Rowling's fictional sorcery franchise is altering perceptions about the age of Harry Potter's audience. Apparently once the teen wizard casts his spell, you can't outgrow it. Kids who were in grade school or middle school when Pottermania broke (the initial book, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, was published in 1998)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2002 | Los Angeles Daily News
As the second installment in the "Harry Potter" saga hits theaters today, here's a rundown on "Potter" films yet to come: _ "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" Due in theaters: Summer or fall 2004 (shooting begins in February 2003). The changes: Director Alfonso Cuaron ("Y Tu Mama Tambien," "A Little Princess") takes over for Chris Columbus, who, after helming the first two movies, remains on board as a producer. Richard Harris died last month, so another actor must be found to play the key role of Professor Dumbledore.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA MTV.com, the New York Daily News and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
FILE THIS in the-wacky-yet-true file. Wild rocker Courtney Love's breast implants have killed her beloved Pomeranian, the New York Post reported yesterday. And it's not what you think. Love purportedly had her implants removed "several years ago," the Post said, but since this is Courtney, ya think she discards her former friends? Nah! Girlfriend wants to keep them around, the New York tab says, as "souvenirs. " Bad idea. Her curious canine saw one of the implants as lunch and promptly keeled over from the nosh.
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