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SPORTS
August 24, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
The Broomall-Newtown squad claimed the Babe Ruth 13-year-old World Series championship with an 11-4 victory over Chandler-Mesa (Ariz.) in Glen Allen, Va., Friday night. Broomall-Newtown, the Mid-Atlantic Region champions, was down by 4-3 before breaking the game open with a three-run fifth to take a 6-4 lead. Broomall-Newtown tacked on five runs in the sixth. Jim White, the MVP of the Mid-Atlantic Regional, had three hits and four RBIs. In the semifinals, Alden Mathes pitched Broomall-Newtown to a 13-0 victory in five innings over Gainesville-Haymarket (Va)
SPORTS
August 27, 2005 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even the free-spending Babe Ruth might have been astonished at the price his old uniform fetched. Exton sports auctioneer David Hunt, acting on behalf of an anonymous client, paid $771,095.70 in an online auction Thursday night for the uniform that the Bambino wore on a 1934 barnstorming tour of Japan. The seller also wanted to remain anonymous, said Hunt, president of Hunt Auctions Inc. The Japan tour, which took place after Ruth's last season with the Yankees, was the great slugger's only barnstorming trip outside the United States, Hunt said.
NEWS
November 24, 1991
OK, xenophobes. This should get your pulse rate up. The New York Times reports that producers at Universal Pictures, now owned by the Japanese, have rewritten the script of a movie about an American baseball player who, cut by the Yankees, decides to try his luck in Japan. The new version is, to put not too fine a point on it, more pro-Japanese. A couple of World War II jokes have been eliminated, but, more important, the hero, played by Tom Selleck, eventually succeeds by adopting Japanese ways - intense training, respect for his teammates and a more mystical approach for meeting horsehide with hickory.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Johnny Sylvester, 74, who became a part of baseball lore when Babe Ruth hit three home runs in a World Series game on his behalf in 1926, died Monday of natural causes. He was the gravely ill boy who, before a World Series game against the St. Louis Cardinals, was promised a home run by Ruth. Ruth hit three for the Yankees in a 10-5 fourth-game win. The boy's doctors told reporters he made a sudden recovery after hearing from Ruth, and a legend was born. The incident was immortalized in newspapers, books and a movie.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | By Jeremy Treatman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Delco West pitcher Dan MacMillan said his slider wasn't working in the first inning of yesterday's Mid-Atlantic Region (16-18) Babe Ruth championship game against Mifflin County (Pa.). So he simply stuck to his fastball and change-up instead. That's all he needed. MacMillan struck out six and yielded only three hits, while Delco West (5-1) stopped Mifflin, 3-0, to win the double-elimination tournament at Radnor. The win sends Delco West to the Senior Babe Ruth World Series for the first time in 22 years.
SPORTS
February 6, 1995 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just as his successors are expected to do in another week or so, Babe Ruth stayed home when training camps opened in 1930. Having hit 46 homers in 1929, the final season of his three-year contract for $70,000 annually, he demanded $80,000 from the New York Yankees. "Why shouldn't I kick?" Ruth told the reporters who constantly trailed him, even during this holdout. "The Yankees made money, and I helped draw crowds as much as I ever did. . . . Even if I quit baseball today, I'm good for $25,000 a year the rest of my life.
NEWS
November 27, 1993 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eric Schmertz has already directed scholarly three-day conferences on two Americans - Dwight Eisenhower and Ronald Reagan - whose lives had worldwide impact. Now he's planning his third, and the subject may be even more of a heavy hitter than the two former presidents. In fact, some might say, the original heavy hitter. Babe Ruth. The 100th anniversary of the Babe's birth is February 1995, and Schmertz, a lawyer and baseball fan, is planning to spend his spare time in the next year putting together a conference devoted to the life and folklore of George Herman Ruth.
SPORTS
May 30, 2000 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the day in 1960 when Maurice Richard ended his unforgettable 18-year career - an event marked by nearly as much grieving in Montreal as the hockey star's death on Saturday - a Canadiens official was asked if the popularity of the "Rocket" exceeded that of the Pope in the predominantly French-speaking Catholic city. "He is not the Pope," answered Camil DesRoches, the Canadiens' public-relations director. "He is God. " For American hockey fans, particularly those in places such as Philadelphia, where the sport is a fairly recent phenomenon, it is impossible to fathom Richard's monumental impact.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | By Terence Samuel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yankee Stadium sits on 11 1/2 acres of hallowed ground on the western edge of the Bronx overlooking the Harlem River. It opened in 1923, the year the New York Yankees won the first of the team's 22 world championships. It is a place that has been consecrated by baseball's giants. Babe Ruth. Joe DiMaggio. Mickey Mantle. Swashbuckling and invincible, the Yankees seemed to embody the national spirit. In the 1920s, before the Empire State Building was finished, people came to New York to see the Statue of Liberty, and Yankee Stadium.
NEWS
July 11, 2006 | By B.G. Kelley
As baseball showcases its All-Stars tonight, there's no way to deny this: The game needs more fun. Baseball is beleaguered by too many black-eye issues: steroid use; domestic abuse; the bottom-line mentality of team owners; agents and lawyers with little or no regard for the game; and unstable teams full of here-today-gone-tomorrow players who are too often greedy and surly. Baseball needs to take a page out of its history. Remember Willie Mays playing stickball on the streets of New York with kids?
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SPORTS
January 26, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
After Tuesday night's State of the Union address, the first American president with a fadeaway jumper was accused of trash-talking. Those critics might be on to something. Unable to put away rival Republicans, President Obama appears lately to have resorted to a sports standby, getting into his opponents' faces and heads. After Republicans mockingly applauded his reference to a final campaign, the president's "I won twice" zinger was a retort any sports fan could appreciate. All that was missing was a "sucka!"
SPORTS
September 3, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
A slight drizzle began falling, but the teenagers filling up two flatbed trucks in the Acme parking lot didn't appear bothered. This parade assembling in the lot in Newtown Square, Delaware County, was for them. "Everybody look over, there's Mrs. Mathes," a coach told the Broomall Newtown Babe Ruth baseball players on the two trucks. Suzanne Mathes, up on the sidewalk, focused her camera on both trucks. She had grandsons on each, and each were national champs. Sunday's parade was to honor the 15-year-old and 13-year-old teams from Broomall Newtown Babe Ruth.
SPORTS
August 24, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
The Broomall-Newtown squad claimed the Babe Ruth 13-year-old World Series championship with an 11-4 victory over Chandler-Mesa (Ariz.) in Glen Allen, Va., Friday night. Broomall-Newtown, the Mid-Atlantic Region champions, was down by 4-3 before breaking the game open with a three-run fifth to take a 6-4 lead. Broomall-Newtown tacked on five runs in the sixth. Jim White, the MVP of the Mid-Atlantic Regional, had three hits and four RBIs. In the semifinals, Alden Mathes pitched Broomall-Newtown to a 13-0 victory in five innings over Gainesville-Haymarket (Va)
SPORTS
June 7, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - When Don Zimmer debuted in 1954 for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Jackie Robinson was no longer the team's everyday second baseman. Robinson floated around the field at the twilight of his career, and he manned left field on July 2, 1954, at Connie Mack Stadium in North Philadelphia. Zimmer played shortstop. Zimmer, who died Wednesday at 83, was baseball's Forrest Gump. He once met Babe Ruth, got married at home plate in a minor-league stadium, called Robinson a teammate, played under Casey Stengel, was assaulted by Pedro Martinez, and instructed Derek Jeter.
NEWS
June 9, 2013
Mantle and Mays, the Parallel Lives of Baseball's Golden Age By Allen Barra Crown Archetype. 498 pp. $27 Reviewed by Bill Lyon Once upon a time, though not so very long ago, there was delivered unto us from Mount Olympus two players of baseball. They ran like cheetahs and sent batted balls into the stratosphere and their throws trailed blue flame and very soon it became evident that the case could be made that these two were not just players of baseball but the two very best.
SPORTS
May 22, 2013 | By Michael Harrington, Inquirer Staff Writer
San Francisco may have a one-game-to-none lead over Washington in the teams' current series, but the Giants and Nationals are even-steven when it comes to broken right hands on righthanders. (The Nats, however, have an overwhelming edge in margin of stupidity, as we'll explain.) Giants starter Ryan Vogelsong, the pride of Octorara Area High, suffered two broken bones in his pitching hand fouling one off in the fifth inning of Monday's 8-0 win over the Nationals. He had surgery on Tuesday morning and is likely out for two months or more.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
By Paul Jablow The phrase "hot stove league" speaks of a different era. With the baseball season over, fans around the country gathered to talk about what their team would need to get to the top next spring. Envision, for example, a group of guys in dripping work boots sitting around a stove in the back of a general store in rural Missouri, guessing whether the Cardinals' aging star pitcher had anything left, or whether the kid rightfielder who hit .325 in triple A could do that in "the show.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
Robert W. Creamer, 90, a sportswriter whose richly researched biographies of Babe Ruth and Casey Stengel are considered two of the finest books ever written about baseball, died July 18 at a nursing home in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. He had prostate cancer, said his son, Tom Creamer. Mr. Creamer was in his 30s when he joined Sports Illustrated as a charter member of the magazine's staff in 1954. His name remains on the magazine's masthead 58 years later as a special contributor. He wrote about horse racing and track and field, and he worked as an editor, but he was best known as a baseball writer.
SPORTS
May 9, 2012 | By Tom Mahon, Daily News Staff Writer
HEY MITT, you might as well concede the presidential election now — Charles Barkley says you don't have a chance. Barkley, a former Sixer turned NBA analyst and SportsWeek columnist, is already calling November's election in favor of President Obama. Barkley was part of TNT's broadcast team for Sunday's Celtics-Hawks game when the camera showed Romney, the Republican nominee, in the Boston Garden crowd. "Mitt Romney. Listen main man, we're going to beat you like a drum in November," Barkley said over-the-air.
NEWS
October 6, 2011
BASEBALL has its Cy Young Award for best pitcher; football, the Vince Lombardi Trophy for the Super Bowl champs. There's a Bill Russell award for the NBA's most valuable player, and hockey has a Prince of Wales Trophy for whatever. So why not an award for political leadership? In this 24/7 scream-bite news cycle, in which bullying and divisiveness seem to have the upper hand and little gets done, let's recognize political leaders who speak softly but carry an effective stick. It would be passé to name it after Teddy Roosevelt.
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