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Baby Boom

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1989 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Sometimes a Hollywood trend becomes so pervasive it blind-sides you. For instance, I thought for sure that Wes Craven's "Shocker" would provide a safe haven from the recent flood of family life theme movies spewing from Hollywood. I was wrong. Even "Shocker," part of the usually trend-proof slasher genre, turned out to be another father-and-son movie. Happily, Craven didn't sugarcoat the father/son relationship - Pop doesn't materialize out of a cornfield carrying a baseball glove; he materializes out of a TV set carrying a bowie knife.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Call it a mini-boom, a boomlet or a baby-boom echo. More U.S. babies were born last year than in any year since the last boom ended in 1964. American women have taken the Census Bureau and other population prognosticators by surprise, as a larger-than-expected share of them are having children well into their 30s and 40s. And early numbers suggest that births this year could surpass the estimated 4.02 million in 1989. "It does appear to be a real upswing in U.S. fertility," said demographer Carl Haub of the Population Reference Bureau, a nonprofit group in Washington.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | For the Inquirer / SEAN PATRICK DUFFY
The year was 1952. The postwar baby boom was in full swing and new families spilled out past city limits into the suburbs. Builder Bill Levitt had an idea, and his idea was Levittown, a sprawling suburban community of reasonably priced homes. This year, Levittown celebrates its 40th anniversary. Last Saturday, the town turned out to watch a parade in its honor.
NEWS
September 10, 1988 | By Ken Tucker, Inquirer TV Critic
Tonight, the new TV season gets under way - sort of - with the debut of a new series that can serve as a paradigm for the whole tedious raft of programs to come. Baby Boom (Channel 3, 9:30 p.m.) stars Kate Jackson in a sitcom version of the 1987 theatrical film that featured Diane Keaton. Baby Boom is the story of J. C. Wiatt (Jackson), a high-powered businesswoman who inherits a baby. In the movie, Wiatt's solution was to move to the country and start a baby-food business. In the television version, Wiatt sticks it out in the big city, hiring a nanny to tend to the child while she wheels and deals.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Did you hear that boom? It was the combined roar of crying, gurgling and the squeak of baby-stroller wheels as the nation's new baby boom continued in earnest last year. The nation's estimated 4,179,000 births in 1990 were the most for one year in nearly three decades. Only at the peak of the postwar baby boom - between 1956 and 1961 - did more annual births occur, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. "They may have to reopen some schools . . . the ones that they closed in the '80s," Stephanie J. Ventura, a demographer with the national center, said yesterday.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By BRIAN SIANO
Please, somebody tell me. Why should we be concerned about the Baby Boom generation? I think I'm entitled to feel just a little neglected. Technically, I'm part of that demographic bulge; born in 1963, just in time to see John Kennedy on TV and actually remember men walking on the moon. All fine and dandy. But I'm on the tail end of the wave, which meant that I didn't listen to the Beatles until years after they'd broken up, and the TV shows from the 1950s, which my generation's supposed to remember so fondly, were available only in reruns.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bang," said the first baby boomer. "The telephone rings, and I find out I'm a symbol for a whole generation, the boomers. " Kathleen Casey Wilkins, by virtue of the fact that she was born at one second after midnight, Jan. 1, 1946, has been designated the first baby of the baby boom, first of a generation of Americans that has been probed and pampered, maligned and manipulated, like no other. And this also means that the Haddon Heights mother of two teenage girls is the first member of the post-war baby boom generation to turn 40, a situation that has made her the subject of a national magazine article and subject to interviews by television and newspaper reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011
NOT TO SOUND totally old-school, but before I had even so much as kissed a boy, my mother used to get in my face and threaten to send me to St. Ann's Infant Home - a place where unwed teens used to be sent to live until they'd given birth - if I ever came home pregnant. I barely understood what she was carrying on about or why it mattered so much, but I knew I wasn't going wherever it was she was saying she would send me. It wasn't so much that it was an awful place, but it had a huge stigma attached to it. Maybe the students at Frayser High School, in Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The maze of brightly colored playground equipment next to the Perkiomen Town Hall has proved a big hit. Little wonder - since over the last 10 years, the number of children in the central Montgomery County township has nearly tripled. In Burlington Township, the high school is being expanded and the size of the district's newest elementary school, Fountain Woods, not yet two years old, is to be doubled. School officials have little choice: Twice as many children 18 and under live in that Burlington County community as did in 1990.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | By James McGregor, Inquirer Washington Bureau (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
The postwar baby-boom generation could go financially bust after retirement because current federal policies are on a collision course with the aging of American society. Unless substantial changes are made soon, experts say, the children of today's working-age Americans will be financially overwhelmed early in the 21st century as they are called on to simultaneously support a "human tidal wave" of retirees and pay for the budget deficits created in the last six years. This gloom-and-doom message was the focus of a "Tomorrow's Elderly" conference that opened here yesterday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
WHAT'S IN THE WATER over at the news stations? Everyone's getting pregnant.   NBC10's Deanna Durante will have to find a red maternity gown when she co-hosts the upcoming Red Ball with colleague Keith Jones . Durante is expecting her second child with hubby Tim Swan . She hasn't announced on air yet, but the station knows Durante is expecting. The couple welcomed their first child, Maya Elizabeth Swan , back in August 2011. Jones and Durante will host the annual Red Cross fundraiser at the Please Touch Museum on March 8. Then there's CBS3's Nicole Brewer , who announced she was pregnant with her first child, tweeting a picture of her 8/2/14 due date.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | BY LAUREN McCUTCHEON, Daily News Staff Writer mccutch@phillynews.com, 215-854-5991
GASP. THAT'S the sound of Temporary Tattle taking a deep inhale. She's held her breath a whole month, awaiting Life & Style 's release of exclusive photos of weeks-old twinsies Kaia and Kane , the latest members of Club Kim Zolciak and Kroy Biermann . Mommy Zolciak is a onetime "Real Housewife of Atlanta" and star of the Bravo spin-off "Don't Be Tardy for the Wedding. " She is currently being sued by former castmate Kandi Burruss for profits made from their, er, hit single, "Don't Be Tardy for the Party.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2012 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN THE senior generation of arena rockers (the Rolling Stones , the Who , Bruce Springsteen , Paul McCartney ) stops performing, how will we ever raise money in a charity concert? Who's going to perform with Bon Jovi ? Matchbox 20 ? Maroon 5 ? Will any bands from the '80s and '90s still be rocking when their fans hit their disposable-income years? Billie Joe Armstrong better straighten himself out because the charity concert of 2030 may depend on Green Day . Well, and the Stones.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Periodically and cyclically, the economy will stink, even more so for people who are less experienced, educated or trained, the youngest members of the work force. The Depression walloped one generation. The recession, oil shortage, and stagflation whipped mine. Many classmates avoided the job market, or the pronounced lack thereof, by diving into grad school and further debt, which drove them toward more lucrative professional if not necessarily innovative endeavors. As The Inquirer's special report "Struggling for Work" makes clear, these are days of diminishing economic returns for the "millennial generation," adults 18 to 34, entering a challenging and rapidly changing marketplace.
NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time in decades, Center City has an opportunity to keep families with young children in Philadelphia instead of watching them flee to the suburbs. So says the Center City District, which Monday issued a report challenging the city's leaders and residents to capitalize on the stunning population growth of young people in Center City and beyond. Many of those new residents are starting to have children, creating a baby boom in neighborhoods such as Bella Vista and Fairmount.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A newborn jaguar at the Philadelphia Zoo is the first there for its mom and dad, the first one born at the zoo since 1972, and a welcome addition to the world's population of a near-threatened species, according to officials. The Friday birth also adds to the zoo's recent baby boom, which has included, since late last year, five prairie dogs, four red kangaroos, two common vampire bats, two Madagascar tree boas, a penguin, a tortoise, a giant river otter, a Titi monkey, a pied tamarin, a gibbon, an aye-aye, a magpie shrike, an ibis, and a kind of lemur called a sifaka.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2011
NOT TO SOUND totally old-school, but before I had even so much as kissed a boy, my mother used to get in my face and threaten to send me to St. Ann's Infant Home - a place where unwed teens used to be sent to live until they'd given birth - if I ever came home pregnant. I barely understood what she was carrying on about or why it mattered so much, but I knew I wasn't going wherever it was she was saying she would send me. It wasn't so much that it was an awful place, but it had a huge stigma attached to it. Maybe the students at Frayser High School, in Memphis, Tenn.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
5G for suspect's capture A reward of $5,000 is being offered for information leading to the capture of escaped murder suspect Omar Roane. Roane, 22, who has the letters "YHM" tattooed on his neck, two teardrop tattoos on his left cheek, and an "RIP Rob" tattoo on his right hand, escaped from a police van on Saturday at Frankford and Cottman avenues in Northeast Philadelphia. Tipsters can contact the U.S. Marshals Service at 866-865-TIPS. 87-year-old man shot dead An 87-year-old man was shot and killed yesterday in the city's Cedarbrook section.
LIVING
August 13, 2008 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A couple of weekends ago, Andrea Bernotavicius competed in a triathlon. She swam a half mile in the Schuylkill, biked 15-plus miles in Fairmount Park, and ran a little more than three miles on Martin Luther King Drive. But Bernotavicius, 49, of Williamstown is no Ironwoman, by her own estimate. She entered the Aug. 3 SheROX Triathlon Series, her first, to see if she could at least finish. (She did, with a time of just over two hours, 11 minutes.) "I wanted to do a triathlon before I was 50," said Bernotavicius, who works in human resources for a Center City law firm.
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