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Baby Boomers

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NEWS
February 21, 2012 | By Lauran Neergaard, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Deaths from liver-destroying hepatitis C are on the rise, and new data show that baby boomers are most at risk. Federal health officials are considering whether anyone born between 1945 and 1965 should get a one-time blood test to check if their livers harbor this ticking time bomb. Two-thirds of people with hepatitis C are in this age group, most unaware they have a festering virus that takes a few decades to do its damage. The issue has taken new urgency since two drugs hit the market last summer that promise to cure many more people than ever was possible.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - She was the first crush for a generation of boys, the perfect playmate for a generation of girls. Annette Funicello, who became a child star as a Mouseketeer on "The Mickey Mouse Club" in the 1950s, ruled among baby boomers, who tuned in every weekday afternoon to watch her on their black-and-white television sets. Then they shed their mouse ears, as Annette did when she teamed up with Frankie Avalon during the '60s in a string of frothy, fun-in-the-sun movies with titles like "Beach Blanket Bingo.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | By Stephen Chapman
The Democratic Party hopes the 1988 election will be a replay of 1976, when the combination of a White House scandal and a weak nominee cost the Republicans their hold on the presidency. But the Democrats shouldn't bet that the Iran-contra affair will have the impact of Watergate, or that Gerald Ford will be reincarnated at the head of the GOP ticket. They would be better off looking for parallels in another election that brought a Democratic victory - 1960. A glance at the crowded Democratic field of declared or likely candidates - Gary Hart, Jesse Jackson, Michael Dukakis, Bruce Babbitt, Richard Gephardt, Albert Gore Jr., Joseph Biden, Paul Simon - underlines what may be the crucial element in the next presidential contest.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Older individuals are reinventing themselves by going back to the classroom. And in college-rich Philadelphia, they and their tuition dollars are welcome on campus. Some are like Howard Magen, a retired CPA who audits classes he loved during his original college days. Others are baby boomers facing retirement who want that longed-for degree before they run out of time, or to stay competitive in the workplace. Take Wanda Amaro, a human-resources executive who is earning her bachelor's degree at age 53. Many colleges offer low-fee or even free classes for seniors.
NEWS
October 6, 1987 | By Ron Wolf, Inquirer Staff Writer
The aging of the baby boomers has touched off a marketing blitz by the manufacturers of lotions, creams, cleansers, ointments, moisturizers and other skin-care products intended to ward off the all-too-obvious effects of growing older. Although many makers of cosmetics imply that their products can prolong or restore youth, federal regulators question such assertions. Earlier this year, the Food and Drug Administration initiated a crackdown on extravagant advertising claims by cosmetics companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1987 | By BILL KENT, Special to the Daily News
"I'm going to take youse out of the '80s," yowls Jon "Bowzer" Bauman as he leaps out of a gleaming peacock blue 1956 Thunderbird convertible during "Bowzer's Original Doo Wop Party," the new summer revue at the Tropicana. "I'm gonna take youse back to da '50s, a simpler era, when Marlon Brando could still fit on a motorcycle, when Pepsi Free didn't cost 75 cents. " Why not? When the casinos first came to Atlantic City, most of the entertainment offered was aimed at people in their 50s and 60s, because those were the folks with the most money to blow.
NEWS
January 6, 1992 | BY MIKE ROYKO
Maybe President Bush ain't too good at arithmetic," Slats Grobnik said. What prompts that observation? "Because he says he don't know why people are more scared of this recession than they were of other recessions that was worse. " Well, he has a point. One need go back only 10 years when we had a recession that was more severe. And there have been others in which the economic indicators were less hopeful. "Yeah, and that's what I mean about his arithmetic. A little simple math can tell you why people are more scared.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"My Life" could be the definitive Baby Boomer tear-jerker, combining "Terms of Endearment" cancer drama with camcorders, the Inner Child and a hero who likes "anything Motown. " It's the story of a successful executive (Michael Keaton) stricken with incurable cancer. He fears he may not live to see his pregnant wife (Nicole Kidman) give birth, so he records himself on video as a gift for his unborn child. The premise is diabolically good, and the slick presentation probably ensures "My Life" the kind of eye-dabbing success predicted for "The Joy Luck Club.
NEWS
January 15, 1986
In "The baby boomers have come of age" (Op-ed Page, Jan. 2) Richard Reeves sounded a sour note for the new year as he marked the 40th anniversary of the birth of the "baby boom" generation. His bleak celebration of a generation that he apparently believes has received its comeuppance is a perfect example of the media disdaining one of its own creations, in this case, the fuss over the baby boom generation. The fascination with this generation is rooted in the media as much as anywhere else.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Older individuals are reinventing themselves by going back to the classroom. And in college-rich Philadelphia, they and their tuition dollars are welcome on campus. Some are like Howard Magen, a retired CPA who audits classes he loved during his original college days. Others are baby boomers facing retirement who want that longed-for degree before they run out of time, or to stay competitive in the workplace. Take Wanda Amaro, a human-resources executive who is earning her bachelor's degree at age 53. Many colleges offer low-fee or even free classes for seniors.
SPORTS
March 20, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
By late Thursday afternoon, the NCAA tournament was raging. Social media was aflame with March Madness, and all throughout America, brackets were being scrutinized like eye charts. Bars, restaurants, dens, even normally staid offices had come alive. And on a TV in the deserted furniture section of a dying mall department store, an old man watched an exhibition game between the Phillies and Rays. The tableau spoke volumes about aging Baby Boomers and the aging sport they cling to. "Baseball is tired," Bryce Harper, the Nationals' 23-year-old superstar, said recently.
NEWS
March 6, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
The lawyer knew something was wrong with her 61-year-old mother. She had begun showing up for appointments two hours early. Or two hours late. She was paying less attention to how she looked. She'd had two wrecks in quick succession on her way to work as a judge's administrative assistant. The lawyer, who works in a small town on the outskirts of Baltimore, knew her mother drank a fair amount at night, but she also knew her mother was still getting promotions. She suspected depression.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
The conventional wisdom is that millennials are not as enamored of cars as Generation Xers such as myself or Baby Boomers who came before us. These kids today get their driver's licenses later than age 16 - if at all - and spend all their time with (pauses to ask 15-year-old Sturgis Kid 4.0 what kind of phone he's using) their Samsung S6s. That is, when we're not yelling at them to stay off our lawns. But there's still that segment of young America that spends its time creating new car designs, often while daydreaming in math class or ignoring the latest English lesson.
NEWS
December 27, 2015 | By Lisa Gillespie, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
After the last of the baby boomers become fully eligible for Medicare, the federal health program can expect significantly higher costs in 2030, because of the high number of beneficiaries and because many are expected to be significantly less healthy than previous generations. The typical Medicare beneficiary who is 65 or older then will more likely be obese, disabled, and suffering from chronic conditions such as heart disease and high blood pressure than those in 2010, according to a report by the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2015 | By Joel Wee and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
First in an occasional series. Baby boomers, the generation that brought America cable television, middle-class pot smoking, and the two-car garage, are now bringing the nation the jobs of the future. The boomers, as they grow older and more infirm, will need home health aides, personal care aides, registered nurses, and physical therapists - jobs that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says will be among the fastest growing in the next seven years. "It's about . . . these aging baby boomers," among other trends, said labor economist Paul Harrington, director of Drexel University's Center for Labor Markets and Policy.
NEWS
June 18, 2015
ISSUE | ENERGY Solar, not tankers Philadelphia should be exceedingly proud that it has created a sustainable business center at the former Navy Yard. The $129 million U.S. Department of Energy Innovation Hub hosts numerous energy-efficient buildings and a 35-megawatt unregulated electric grid with leading smart-grid research. Let's hope that Philadelphia's future lies with safe, sustainable energy rather than explosive tanker cars and leaking pipelines that could endanger the city.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015
Extra cash. Steady income no matter how long you live. No need to repay. Both explicitly and implicitly, reverse-mortgage pitches often make the equity-tapping loans sound like a risk-free answer for borrowers facing a shortfall in retirement income. But they have a failure rate of about 10 percent, far beyond those of conventional mortgages. That's one reason the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau moved Thursday to advance its campaign aimed at ensuring that homeowners understand their risks, as well as their benefits.
BUSINESS
May 5, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Kaye's perch as the leader of a global human resources consulting firm puts him in a position to see the psychological aftermath of one of the biggest economic events of our time - the recession that officially ended in 2009 but lingered much longer. On Friday, the U.S. Labor Department will issue its closely watched employment report, and if recent trends hold, it will be positive - more jobs, fewer unemployed, and a declining unemployment rate. "We're kind of happy about the way things are going because finally the world is getting ready for what we do in the sense that the people agenda is now much more on the CEO agenda than it ever was before," said Kaye, 50, chief executive of the Hay Group.
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