CollectionsBaby Bottles
IN THE NEWS

Baby Bottles

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside her Ursinus College lab, biology professor Rebecca Roberts dons rubber gloves and watches as her students inject spleen samples from mice with a reactive substance. It's part of Roberts' eight years of work on bisphenol A, an ingredient in plastics ranging from reusable food containers to eyeglass lenses to CDs. It's also part of her life as a mom: Many baby bottles contain BPA. "I wholeheartedly believe there are serious concerns with this compound," she says, thoughtfully fingering a test tube partly filled with the white, powdery substance.
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside her Ursinus College lab, biology professor Rebecca Roberts dons rubber gloves and watches as her students inject spleen samples from mice with a reactive substance. It's part of Roberts' eight years of work on bisphenol A, an ingredient in plastics ranging from reusable food containers to eyeglass lenses to CDs. It's also part of her life as a mom: Many baby bottles contain BPA. "I wholeheartedly believe there are serious concerns with this compound," she says, thoughtfully fingering a test tube partly filled with the white, powdery substance.
NEWS
April 28, 2008
Consumers eager to avoid suspect plastics won't find the going easy. Labeling is not always required for all ingredients. But toxicology experts say taking the following steps can lower possible risk. Avoid placing hot food or liquids in plastic containers. Use glass, ceramic or stainless-steel containers instead. Heating plastics to high temperatures promotes the leaching of chemicals out of containers and into the food or liquid they hold. (Freezing liquids in plastic bottles poses no such risk.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | By Beth Arburn Davis, Special to The Inquirer
The "murder bottle" looks innocent enough: transparent aqua-colored glass topped by a 7-inch-long tube ending in a rubber nipple. Sitting in a glass display case with two dozen other antique baby bottles, the flat, oblong container embossed with the word Manhattan seems to be just another interesting artifact from the large collection of baby bottles and related paraphernalia in the York County home of Don H. and JoAnn E. Gifford. Not quite, said Don Gifford, president of the American Collectors of Infant Feeders (ACIF)
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
This weekend could bring a major announcement from the Food and Drug Administration about a chemical commonly used in food packaging - bisphenol A, or BPA. Saturday is the court-ordered deadline for the agency to respond to a petition by the Natural Resources Defense Council asking that BPA be banned as a food additive, which would also preclude its use in packaging. At stake is the future of a chemical that held enormous promise because it could be used to make a hard, clear plastic.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | by Jack McGuire and Jim Nolan, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer Nicole Weisensee contributed to this report
The mother says she found out when she woke up. The father says he didn't hear anything all night. Sometime between the darkness of Saturday night and the light of yesterday morning, a 5-month-old infant and her 18-month-old sister died in the same room where they were sleeping with their parents. A source in the medical examiner's office said there was "nothing outwardly suspicious" about the deaths of Laisha and Shainera Payne, noting that there were "no obvious signs of trauma.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The federal government announced Tuesday that baby bottles and sippy cups can no longer contain the chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA. The move came after the U.S. chemical industry's chief association determined that all manufacturers of bottles and sippy cups had already abandoned the chemical due to safety concerns. The American Chemistry Council had asked the Food and Drug Administration to phase out rules allowing BPA in those products in October. "Consumers can be confident that these products do not contain BPA," FDA spokesman Allen Curtis said in a statement, adding that the agency's action was based on the bottle industry's phase out of the chemical.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | By Cheryl Baisden, Special to The Inquirer
Four Gloucester County College students, calico baby bonnets tied under their chins, stood in the student center cafeteria draining orange juice from their baby bottles. As each finished the snack he squealed a contented "goo- goo ga-ga" at the lunchtime crowd. Under normal circumstances, imitating babies in front of 300 fellow students would have earned the students the disdain of their classmates, but on this day - the day before April Fools' Day - such antics endeared them to their friends and gave them a chance for a windfall.
NEWS
January 18, 1986 | By Alison Carper, Special to The Inquirer
When little Glenn Johnson left the maternity ward at Kent General Hospital in Dover, Del., two weeks ago, he was showered with the usual gifts - snowsuits, diapers, baby bottles - and an unusual one, a book of nursery rhymes. "We're not trying to make superbabies," said Elisabeth Poole, president of Read Aloud Delaware, the organization that issued the book as part of a statewide effort to get parents to read to their infants. "When you read to an infant, the sound of your voice is soothing," she said.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Phil Grecco, For The Inquirer
On a recent business trip to Thailand, I took advantage of an off day to do some sightseeing. One option listed in the travel brochure in my hotel room that caught my eye was "The Tiger Temple Tour," described as "one of the most extraordinary sights you will ever see. " It turned out to be even better than advertised. As our tour bus arrived at Kanchanaburi, a remote forest region in western Thailand, it was clear that this was neither a temple nor a zoo. The grounds were inhabited by Buddhist monks, who live among such animals as water buffalo, deer, wild boar, peacocks (all roaming about freely)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | Associated Press
NEW YORK - We have dolls that wet, crawl and talk. We have dolls with perfect hourglass figures. And we have plenty that come with itty bitty baby bottles. But it's a breast-feeding doll whose suckling sounds are prompted by sensors sewn into a halter top at the nipples of little girls that caught some flak after hitting the U.S. market. "I just want the kids to be kids," Bill O'Reilly said on his Fox News show when he learned of the Breast Milk Baby. "And this kind of stuff, we don't need this.
NEWS
July 18, 2012 | Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The federal government announced Tuesday that baby bottles and sippy cups can no longer contain the chemical bisphenol-A, or BPA. The move came after the U.S. chemical industry's chief association determined that all manufacturers of bottles and sippy cups had already abandoned the chemical due to safety concerns. The American Chemistry Council had asked the Food and Drug Administration to phase out rules allowing BPA in those products in October. "Consumers can be confident that these products do not contain BPA," FDA spokesman Allen Curtis said in a statement, adding that the agency's action was based on the bottle industry's phase out of the chemical.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
This weekend could bring a major announcement from the Food and Drug Administration about a chemical commonly used in food packaging - bisphenol A, or BPA. Saturday is the court-ordered deadline for the agency to respond to a petition by the Natural Resources Defense Council asking that BPA be banned as a food additive, which would also preclude its use in packaging. At stake is the future of a chemical that held enormous promise because it could be used to make a hard, clear plastic.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Phil Grecco, For The Inquirer
On a recent business trip to Thailand, I took advantage of an off day to do some sightseeing. One option listed in the travel brochure in my hotel room that caught my eye was "The Tiger Temple Tour," described as "one of the most extraordinary sights you will ever see. " It turned out to be even better than advertised. As our tour bus arrived at Kanchanaburi, a remote forest region in western Thailand, it was clear that this was neither a temple nor a zoo. The grounds were inhabited by Buddhist monks, who live among such animals as water buffalo, deer, wild boar, peacocks (all roaming about freely)
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Inside her Ursinus College lab, biology professor Rebecca Roberts dons rubber gloves and watches as her students inject spleen samples from mice with a reactive substance. It's part of Roberts' eight years of work on bisphenol A, an ingredient in plastics ranging from reusable food containers to eyeglass lenses to CDs. It's also part of her life as a mom: Many baby bottles contain BPA. "I wholeheartedly believe there are serious concerns with this compound," she says, thoughtfully fingering a test tube partly filled with the white, powdery substance.
NEWS
April 28, 2008
Consumers eager to avoid suspect plastics won't find the going easy. Labeling is not always required for all ingredients. But toxicology experts say taking the following steps can lower possible risk. Avoid placing hot food or liquids in plastic containers. Use glass, ceramic or stainless-steel containers instead. Heating plastics to high temperatures promotes the leaching of chemicals out of containers and into the food or liquid they hold. (Freezing liquids in plastic bottles poses no such risk.
NEWS
April 28, 2008 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside her Ursinus College lab, biology professor Rebecca Roberts dons rubber gloves and watches as her students inject spleen samples from mice with a reactive substance. It's part of Roberts' eight years of work on bisphenol A, an ingredient in plastics ranging from reusable food containers to eyeglass lenses to CDs. It's also part of her life as a mom: Many baby bottles contain BPA. "I wholeheartedly believe there are serious concerns with this compound," she says, thoughtfully fingering a test tube partly filled with the white, powdery substance.
NEWS
November 4, 2003 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Without requiring lab tests to determine their safety, the U.S. government has approved thousands of chemicals for use in such products as sofa cushions, soaps, paints and baby bottles. On average, two more chemicals are approved every day. The result: Consumers are unwittingly part of a vast, uncontrolled lab experiment. "We're treating [people] worse than lab rats," said Karen Florini, a lawyer with the nonprofit group Environmental Defense. "At least with lab rats, somebody bothers to collect the data.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | By Justin Pritchard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Havertown woman remains in Delaware County Prison on charges she let her 10-month-old granddaughter drink from a baby bottle containing the heroin-related drug methadone. The child lost consciousness and was rushed by helicopter to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia around 11 a.m. Aug. 21. The grandmother, Barbara Bucci, 49, of the 3000 block of Darby Road, was arrested the next day and charged with endangering the welfare of a child, recklessly endangering another, and possession of a controlled substance.
NEWS
July 10, 1996 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
The nipple wars continue in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court. What it is battling, says the Jenk-in-town law firm of Mitchell A. Kramer & Associates, is nursing- bottle syndrome, or NBS. Nonsense, says Evenflo, a major manufacturer of baby bottles. Kramer's lawsuits on behalf of Philadelphia-area parents are "an abuse of the legal system," declares a company statement. Nursing-bottle syndrome results from allowing a child to suck for an extended period on a bottle of milk, formula, juice or other substance that can cause tooth decay.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|