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NEWS
January 29, 1992 | By Joe Ferry, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Montgomery Township police are investigating a possible product-tampering incident in which glass particles were discovered in a jar of baby food, police announced yesterday. Lt. Gordon Simes, of the Montgomery Township Police Department, said a Horsham Township woman, whom he would not identify, said she had purchased jars of baby food Jan. 18 from the Acme Market in the Montgomery Commons shopping center on Route 309, just north of Route 63. He said she noticed the glass while feeding her child from one of the jars on Monday.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Joe Ferry, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Montgomery Township police are treating the discovery of glass in a jar of baby food on Monday as an isolated incident, rather than as part of more widespread product tampering, police said yesterday. Lt. Gordon Simes said the jar and its contents had been sent to the Food and Drug Administration for further analysis. The results will not be available for several weeks, he said. "There is no evidence to suggest that the jar was tampered with," Simes said. Simes identified the woman who made the complaint as Sharon Spence, 26, of the English Village Apartments, Horsham Township.
FOOD
September 20, 1987 | The Inquirer Staff
If you buy baby food at the supermarket, you're bringing home a product that is just as healthy as any baby food you could make at home, according to a recent health report. Home products sometimes contain more salt, sugar and additives than their commercial counterparts, the report, prepared by the American Council on Science and Health, stated. The report does not discourage parents from preparing baby food at home. But it does point out that parents are not sacrificing quality for the sake of convenience when they purchase commercial baby foods, said Elizabeth Whelan, executive director of the group.
FOOD
June 4, 1995 | By Colleen Pierre, FOR THE INQUIRER
A recent study contended that eating lots of fish didn't reduce the risk of heart attacks. Then the Center for Science in the Public Interest panned commercially prepared baby food. Finally, the National Heart Savers Association bought advertising space in 40 newspapers and commanded: "Don't drink 2 percent milk. " If this kind of news leaves you feeling confused and discouraged, come get a spoonful of reality: THE FISH ISSUE. One study does not refute an entire body of evidence.
FOOD
March 29, 1995 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vincent Martorano is no baby. Not at 5-foot-5 and 190 pounds of muscle. Not with 11 years of weight lifting under his belt, years that have left him looking like a cross between a human-size cinder block and a scaled-down tugboat. That's why it's so surprising to hear the affable, ponytailed 24-year-old take a break from his daily workout at Hardbodies Gym in Lindenwold, to speak out, unashamed, about his love for Gerber's mashed bananas. "It's easy to digest and it's pure," he said, above the blare of rock music and the effortful grunts and shrieks of his fellow lifters.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1994 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
H. J. Heinz Co. is a lot like a slow bottle of ketchup these days. Slam it on the table. Smack it. Pump it straight up and down. No matter what, after more than a decade of growth fed by fat price hikes, the 1990s have been slow-going for Heinz. As with other large food companies, sales of Heinz's big U.S. brands - Heinz ketchup, Star-Kist tuna, Ore-Ida potatoes, and 9-Lives cat food - have been hampered by mature markets just now staggering out of recession. Cheaper no-name brands remain a threat at home and abroad.
FOOD
December 4, 1988 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Food Writer
The timing couldn't have been better. Just as the film Baby Boom was bringing the idea of wholesome, homemade, "gourmet" baby food to the American consciousness, similar products were being readied for store shelves. The "Country Baby" applesauce "made in Vermont" by Diane Keaton's Baby Boom character may have been fictional, but Earth's Best and Simply Pure are not. They are the real thing - 100 percent organic, all-natural baby foods. Earth's Best was introduced in natural-food stores nationwide just one year ago and now sells in 1,500 such specialty markets as well as in supermarkets in New England, Upstate New York, northern New Jersey and Colorado and, via home delivery, through diaper services nationally.
FOOD
July 22, 1992 | By Ginger Munsch Crichton, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writer Marilynn Marter contributed to this article
Hey, baby, what's for dinner? Might be organically grown rice and lentils with a carrot-parsnip mix on the side and guava juice. Maybe even a papaya-pineapple dessert. In the $1 billion-a-year baby food industry, organic and Hispanic foods are among the newest items competing for pint-size palates. These consumers may not have much to say about the variety of foods available, but they do eat a lot of them - an average of 500 jars during the eight to 12 months that a child usually is fed prepared baby foods.
NEWS
February 12, 1998 | By Douglas A. Campbell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You could go to Wal-Mart today and buy a tube of Revlon lipstick for $6.47. Or you could wait until Saturday, drive to the Cowtown flea market near Woodstown and, at Nancy Bea's booth, buy a tube of Revlon for about $2. But don't wait until April 8 to save a few dollars. On that Wednesday, a law signed last month by Gov. Whitman will put Bea, of Elmer, who said she had been selling cosmetics at flea markets for the last 12 years, out of business. It would do the same to flea-market vendors selling baby food or any over-the-counter drugs marked with a date.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1994 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Swiss pharmaceuticals firm Sandoz Ltd. said yesterday it was buying Gerber Products Co. for $3.7 billion in cash - a surprisingly high bid that sent shares of the baby-food maker up 44 percent. The long-rumored takeover of Gerber came after a private auction process that left Sandoz ahead of its rivals with a bid that appeared to have sealed the U.S. company's fate. "You're not going to see someone else coming in and making a bid," said Dean Witter analyst David Adelman. "This price is going to deter anyone.
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NEWS
May 29, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The health department usually inspects a Philadelphia eatery once a year. At Copabanana on South Street, however, sanitarians have dropped in six times since January and asked it to shut down twice. The margarita and burger joint has a chronic problem with keeping food at safe temperatures. When perishable items are stored between 42 and 165 degrees Fahrenheit, toxic bacteria - the types that can cause food poisoning - can multiply quickly. On May 18  a sanitarian found calamari and coleslaw stored at 46 degrees, 5 degrees warmer than is considered safe.
NEWS
August 18, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the poor, food is not only scarce, it's often rotten and germ-ridden. Corner stores and small supermarkets that feed vast swaths of impoverished Philadelphia offer bacteria-laced foods in unhealthy conditions that can lead to foodborne illness, a Drexel University study shows. Customers vouch for the science. "Potatoes and baby food are moldy, lettuce is rotten, and the mice are having a good time in boxes of noodles," said Rodney Jenkins, 47, an unemployed North Philadelphia man. "I ate bad fruit from a corner store and got sick.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  A   RIANA GRANDE and Big Sean found one of the big hits of the summer with "Problem. " They may have also found each other. E! News reports that the two are dating: "They have been friends since they made the song together. They have been spending more time together and recently have been getting very close. They are both doing great. " E! News had previously - and exclusively - broken the news that Ariana had ended things with her 19-year-old Aussie boyfriend, Jai Brooks . "When her grandfather was dying, everyone was there for her. People flew to Florida to be with her, but Jai didn't," the source said.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
I am very sorry to have to tell you that Mother Mary's health has taken a dramatic and unexpected turn for the worse, so this won't be a funny column. Except for the fact that she is at her funniest when times are darkest. She's been newly diagnosed with advanced lung cancer, has moved up north with me, and has entered hospice care at my house. Mercifully, Brother Frank, Daughter Francesca, and family and friends are all around her, and she is resting comfortably. So comfortably, in fact, that the hospice nurses, who are saints on wheels, cannot believe it. One nurse asked Mother Mary if she was having any pain - and she pointed to me. So you get the idea.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Reviewing autopsy photos of Nathalyz Rivera's emaciated body, a judge said she looked as if she had suffered in a concentration camp. Nathalyz, who was 3 when she starved to death inside her West Oak Lane home in September, lay on the medical examiner's table, her eyes sunken; her bottom, back, and head covered with bedsores; her bones poking through her skin; her hair gone in patches. "Like an Auschwitz child," Municipal Court Judge James M. DeLeon said during a preliminary hearing for Nathalyz's parents, Carmen Ramirez, 27, and Carlos Rivera, 30, who will be tried on murder and other charges.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Camden-based Campbell Soup Co., said Tuesday that it eliminated 250 salaried positions as it tries to streamline operations and reverse a decline in sales. A company spokeswoman would not say how many of the jobs came from its headquarters. The company took a restructuring charge of $20 million to account for those positions. Through this and other measures, the company said, it expected annualized savings of $40 million. In reporting quarterly financial results, Campbell said its quarterly profit fell 30 percent as U.S. sales of soups and V8 beverage declined.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Continuing its efforts to shift into faster-growing areas of the supermarket, Campbell Soup Co. said Thursday that it had reached an agreement to buy Plum Organics, a California producer of baby foods and snacks for toddlers and older children. Campbell did not say what it agreed to pay for Plum, owned by the venture-capital firm Catamount Ventures. Founded in 2007 by Neil Grimmer, the current chief executive, and a partner in Catamount Ventures, Plum Organics had $93 million in gross sales last year.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2013 | By Teresa F. Lindeman, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
PITTSBURGH - Before the stock markets opened Thursday, Pittsburgh's world-famous ketchup maker, H.J. Heinz Co., announced that it had agreed to be acquired for $28 billion in cash and debt by an investment partnership between Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway and 3G Capital, owner of such well-known brands as Burger King and Budweiser. Heinz had been the subject of takeover rumors for years, as many thought it was a small enough and tempting enough player in the food business to be swallowed by another company.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Lisa T. McElroy, For The Inquirer
I am not a homemade kind of gal. I'm not even a homemade kind of mom. While I admire the moms who paint their own furniture and sew their own diaper covers and regularly sit their kids down at the long beat-up farm table for craft time, it just ain't me. I make a mean brownie and a decent spaghetti sauce, but that's about as far as I'll usually go. But a couple of weeks ago, I was reading Jennifer Reese's inspiring book Make the Bread, Buy the...
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By Anna Nguyen, For The Inquirer
Just a few short weeks ago, my daughter Mila, not yet 2, happily munched on tapas and demanded more flatbread with dip at Amada. She chowed down on grilled eggplant picked from Linvilla Orchards, and devoured pattypan squash from the Media Farmers Market. She also enjoyed eating shrimp and fish. I proudly thought I had a hearty - even adventurous - eater. But then, the other night, Mila opened her mouth to let a mass of chewed grapes fall out: "Mom - has skin. " Minutes before, she wouldn't touch her asparagus, which she usually inhales.
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